Ben Bernanke Sees Serious Problems With Bitcoin | Newsmax.com

News Flash: Bitcoiners will soon slash inflation rate by 50 percent. Ben Bernanke will probably not follow a similar trend.

submitted by Julian702 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

In the news • [coindesk] Ben Bernanke: Bitcoin Has 'Serious problems'

submitted by btcforumbot to BtcForum [link] [comments]

The new Bitcoin betting website Predictious now offering to bet on who will replace Ben Bernanke at the FED

The new Bitcoin betting website Predictious now offering to bet on who will replace Ben Bernanke at the FED submitted by Vodnon to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[Part - 32] Large college ebooks/eTextbooks thread for cheap rates [$4 to $25]

  1. Business Law with UCC Applications Student Edition, 13th Edition: Gordon Brown & Paul Sukys
  2. Sex-Related Homicide and Death Investigation: Practical and Clinical Perspectives, 2nd Edition: Vernon J. Geberth
  3. Understanding Music, 8th Edition: Jeremy Yudkin
  4. Integrated Product and Process Design and Development: The Product Realization Process, 2nd Edition: Edward B. Magrab & Satyandra K. Gupta & F. Patrick McCluskey & Peter Sandborn
  5. Security Analysis, 6th Edition: Benjamin Graham & David Dodd & Warren Buffett
  6. Contemporary Nursing: Issues, Trends, & Management, 8th Edition: Barbara Cherry & Susan R. Jacob
  7. Mediation Theory and Practice, 3rd Edition: Suzanne McCorkle & Melanie J. Reese
  8. Deviant Behavior, 12th Edition: Alex Thio & Jim D. Taylor & Martin D. Schwartz
  9. A Guide to Econometrics, 6th Edition: Peter Kennedy
  10. Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing Among Five Approaches, 4th Edition: John W. Creswell & Cheryl N. Poth
  11. Ethics in Counseling and Therapy: Developing an Ethical Identity, 1st Edition: Rick A. Houser & Stephen Joseph Thoma
  12. Legal Aspects of Sports, 2nd Edition: John J. Miller & Kristi Schoepfer
  13. Western Civilizations: Their History & Their Culture, (Vol. 2), 19th Edition: Joshua Cole & Carol Symes
  14. Modern Principles of Macroeconomics, 4th Edition: Tyler Cowen & Alex Tabarrok
  15. Reading Research: A User-Friendly Guide for Health Professionals, 6th Edition: Barbara Davies & Jo Logan
  16. Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology, 6th Edition: Steven M. Cahn
  17. Design of Machinery, 6th Edition: Robert Norton
  18. Entrepreneurship, 5th Edition: Andrew Zacharakis & William D. Bygrave & Andrew C. Corbett
  19. Chemical Dependency Counseling: A Practical Guide, 5th Edition: Robert R. Perkinson
  20. Database Systems: The Complete Book, 2nd Edition: Hector Garcia-Molina & Jeffrey D. Ullman & Jennifer Widom
  21. CompTIA A+ Core 1 Exam: Guide to Computing Infrastructure, 10th Edition: Jean Andrews & Joy Dark & Jill West
  22. An Introduction to Family Social Work, 4th Edition: Donald Collins & Catheleen Jordan & Heather Coleman
  23. Bates’ Nursing Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking, 2nd Edition: Beth Hogan-Quigley & Mary Louise Palm & Lynn S. Bickley
  24. Textbook of Cancer Epidemiology, 3rd Edition: Hans-Olov Adami & David J. Hunter & Pagona Lagiou & Lorelei Mucci
  25. New and Emerging Issues in Latinx Health, 1st Edition, 2020 Edition: Airín D. Martínez & Scott D. Rhodes
  26. Explorations: Introduction to Astronomy, 9th Edition: Thomas Arny
  27. Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology, 9th Edition: Ronald J. Comer & Jonathan S. Comer
  28. The Canadian Environment in Political Context, 2nd Edition: Andrea Olive
  29. Control Systems Engineering, 8th Edition: Norman S. Nise
  30. Elementary & Intermediate Algebra for College Students, 5th Edition: Allen R. Angel & Dennis Runde
  31. Biology for the Informed Citizen, 1st Edition: Donna M. Bozzone & Douglas S. Green
  32. The Personality Puzzle, 8th Edition: David C. Funder
  33. Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology 13th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa & Scott Linneman
  34. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 3rd Canadian Edition: Jonathan Berk
  35. Human Aging, 2nd Edition: Paul W. Foos & M. Cherie Clark
  36. Gardner's Art Through the Ages: A Global History, 16th Edition: Fred S. Kleiner
  37. ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS Coding Handbook, with Answers, 2019 Rev. Edition: Nelly Leon-Chisen
  38. Statistics for Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing: MyoungJin Kim & Caroline Mallory
  39. Docker in Action, 2nd Edition: Jeff Nickoloff & Stephen Kuenzli
  40. Human Dimensions of Wildlife Management, 2nd Edition: Daniel J. Decker & Shawn J. Riley & William F. Siemer
  41. Maternal Child Nursing Care, 6th Edition: Shannon E. Perry & Marilyn J. Hockenberry & Deitra Leonard Lowdermilk & David Wilson
  42. Public Speaking: Concepts and Skills for a Diverse Society, 8th Edition: Clella Jaffe
  43. Designing and Managing the Supply Chain, 3rd Edition: David Simchi-Levi & Philip Kaminsky & Edith Simchi-Levi
  44. Microbiology Experiments: A Health Science Perspective, 9th Edition: John Kleyn & Anna Oller
  45. Graduate Study in Psychology, 2019th Edition: American Psychological Association
  46. Data Mining for Business Analytics: Concepts, Techniques and Applications in Python, 1st Edition: Galit Shmueli & Peter C. Bruce & Peter Gedeck & Nitin R. Patel
  47. Modern Rhetorical Criticism, 4th Edition: Roderick P Hart & Suzanne M. Daughton & Rebecca Lavally
  48. Introduction to Maternity and Pediatric Nursing, 8th Edition: Gloria Leifer
  49. France From 1851 to the Present: Universalism in Crisis 2008 Edition: R. Célestin & E. DalMolin
  50. The Certified Six Sigma Yellow Belt Handbook: Govindarajan Ramu
  51. Essentials of Health Information Management, 2nd Edition: Michelle Green & Mary Jo Bowie
  52. Psychology of Gender, 5th Edition: Vicki S. Helgeson
  53. Health Insurance and Managed Care: What They Are and How They Work, 5th Edition: Peter R. Kongstvedt
  54. Successful Coaching, 4th Edition: Rainer Martens
  55. Internet Measurement: Infrastructure, Traffic and Applications, 1st Edition: Mark Crovella & Balachander Krishnamurthy
  56. CompTIA Security+ Practice Tests: Exam SY0-501, 1st Edition: S. Russell Christy & Chuck Easttom
  57. Anatomical Landmark Palpation, 1st Edition: Paula Maxwell
  58. Oracle Database 12c: The Complete Reference, 1st Edition: Bob Bryla & Kevin Loney
  59. Research Design in Counseling, 4th Edition: Puncky Paul Heppner & Bruce E. Wampold & Jesse Owen & Thompson & Kenneth T. Wang
  60. Fundamentals of Management, 11th Edition: Stephen P. Robbins & Mary Coulter & David A. Decenzo
  61. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 7th Edition: American Psychological Association
  62. How to Do Systems Analysis: Primer and Casebook, 1st Edition: John E. Gibson & William T. Scherer & William F. Gibson & Michael C. Smith
  63. Earth: An Introduction to Physical Geology, 12th Edition: Edward J. Tarbuck & Frederick K. Lutgens & Dennis G. Tasa
  64. Surveying Fundmanentals and Practices, 7th Edition: Jerry A. Nathanson & Michael T. Lanzafama & Philip Kissam
  65. The Sociology of Health, Illness, and Health Care: A Critical Approach, 8th Edition: Rose Weitz
  66. Calculus, 4th Edition: Jon Rogawski & Colin Adams & Robert Franzosa
  67. Federal Income Taxation, 5th Edition: Richard Schmalbeck & Lawrence Zelenak & Sarah B Lawsky
  68. Strategic Compensation: A Human Resource Management Approach, 9th Edition: Joseph J. Martocchio
  69. Applied Business Ethics: A Skills-Based Approach, 1st Edition: Dean Bredeson
  70. Junqueira's Basic Histology: Text and Atlas, 15th Edition: Anthony Mescher
  71. The PMP Exam: How to Pass on Your First Try, 6th Edition: Andy Crowe
  72. Mediation: Empowerment in Conflict Management, 2nd Edition: Kathy Domenici & Stephen W. Littlejohn
  73. Marketing Analytics: Strategic Models and Metrics, 1st Edition: Stephan Sorger
  74. Identities and Inequalities: Exploring the Intersections of Race, Class, Gender, & Sexuality, 3rd Edition: David Newman
  75. The Policy-Based Profession: An Introduction to Social Welfare Policy Analysis for Social Workers, 7th Edition: Philip R. Popple & Leslie Leighninger
  76. Burns and Grove's The Practice of Nursing Research: Appraisal, Synthesis, and Generation of Evidence, 8th Edition: Jennifer R. Gray & Susan K. Grove & Suzanne Sutherland
  77. China, Russia, and Twenty-First Century Global Geopolitics: Paul J. Bolt & Sharyl N. Cross
  78. Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm, 15th Edition, Global Edition: Kenneth C. Laudon & Jane P. Laudon
  79. Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) Provider Manual, 16th Edition: American Heart Association
  80. Dutton's Orthopaedic: Examination, Evaluation and Intervention, 5th Edition: Mark Dutton
  81. 70-741 Networking with Windows Server 2016: Microsoft Official Academic Course
  82. Practical Business Math Procedures, 13th Edition: Jeffrey Slater
  83. Financial Accounting, 5th Edition: David Spiceland & Wayne Thomas & Don Herrmann
  84. Introduction to Global Politics, 5th Edition: Steven L. Lamy & John S. Masker
  85. Goldman-Cecil Medicine, 26th Edition: Lee Goldman & Andrew I. Schafer
  86. Social Beings: Core Motives in Social Psychology, 4th Edition: Susan T. Fiske
  87. Using Statistics in the Social and Health Sciences with SPSS and Excel, 1st Edition: Martin Lee Abbott
  88. Trigonometry, 1st edition: Robert F. Blitzer
  89. Social Development, 3rd Edition: Ross D. Parke & Glenn I. Roisman & Amanda J. Rose
  90. Assessment is Essential, 1st Edition: Susan Green & Robert Johnson
  91. Crafting the InfoSec Playbook: Security Monitoring and Incident Response Master Plan, 1st Edition: Jeff Bollinger & Brandon Enright & Matthew Valites
  92. Selecting Effective Treatments: A Comprehensive, Systematic Guide to Treating Mental Disorders, 5th Edition: Lourie W. Reichenberg & Linda Seligman
  93. DK Guide to Public Speaking, 3rd Edition: Lisa A. Ford-Brown & DK Dorling Kindersley
  94. A World Full of Women, 6th Edition: Martha C. Ward & Monica D. Edelstein
  95. Invention and Craft: A Guide to College Writing, 1st Edition: Ronda Leathers Dively
  96. Modern Optical Engineering, 4th Edition: Warren J. Smith
  97. An Introduction to Intercultural Communication: Identities in a Global Community, 9th Edition: Fred E. Jandt
  98. Children's Thinking: Cognitive Development and Individual Differences, 6th Edition: David F. Bjorklund & Kayla B. Causey
  99. Financial Accounting: An Introduction to Concepts, Methods and Uses, 14th Edition: Roman L. Weil & Katherine Schipper & Jennifer Francis
  100. Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die, 1st Edition: Chip Heath & Dan Heath
  101. Laboratory Manual for Introductory Geology, 4th Edition: Allan Ludman & Stephen Marshak
  102. Cognition, 6th Edition: Scott Sinnett & Daniel Smilek & Alan Kingstone
  103. Mathematical Statistics with Applications, 7th Edition: Dennis Wackerly & William Mendenhall & Richard L. Scheaffer
  104. We the People, Core 12th Edition: Benjamin Ginsberg & Theodore J. Lowi & Margaret Weir & Caroline J. Tolbert & Andrea L. Campbell
  105. Organizational Behaviour: Understanding and Managing Life at Work, 10th Edition: Gary Johns
  106. Forecasting And Predictive Analytics With Forecast X, 7th Edition: J. Holton Wilson & Barry Keating
  107. Nurse as Educator: Principles of Teaching and Learning for Nursing Practice, 5th Edition: Susan B. Bastable
  108. Curriculum Development in Nursing Education, 4th Edition: Carroll L. Iwasiw & Mary-Anne Andrusyszyn & Dolly Goldenberg
  109. Exploring Social Issues: Using SPSS for Windows, 3rd Edition: Joseph F. Healey & John E. Boli & Earl R. Babbie & Frederick S. Halley
  110. ACSM's Resources for the Personal Trainer, 5th Edition: American College of Sports Medicine
  111. Adolescence, Canadian Edition: Ian McMahan & Susan Thompson
  112. Business Ethics in Action: Seeking Human Excellence in Organizations: Domenec Mele
  113. Community & Public Health Nursing: Evidence for Practice, 3rd Edition: Rosanna DeMarco & Judith Healey-Walsh
  114. Macroeconomics, 10th Edition: Andrew B. Abel & Ben Bernanke & Dean Croushore
  115. Principles of Corporate Finance, 11th Edition: Richard Brealey
  116. Studio Thinking from the Start: The K–8 Art Educator’s Handbook, 1st Edition: Jillian Hogan & Lois Hetland & Diane B. Jaquith & Ellen Winner & David P. Nelson
  117. Engineering Design Graphics with Autodesk Inventor 2020, 1st Edition: James D. Bethune
  118. Indian Polity, 6th Edition: M. Laxmikanth
  119. Mathematics for Elementary Teachers: A Contemporary Approach, 10th Edition: Gary L. Musser & Blake E. Peterson & William F. Burger
  120. Foundations of Materials Science and Engineering, 6th Edition: William Smith & Javad Hashemi
  121. Comparative Health Systems: A Global Perspective, 2nd Edition: James A. Johnson & Carleen Stoskopf & Leiyu Shi
  122. The Writer's Presence, 9th Edition: Donald McQuade & Robert Atwan
  123. Statistics in Action: Understanding a World of Data, 2nd Edition: Ann E. Watkins & Richard L. Scheaffer & George W. Cobb
  124. The New Rules of Marketing and PR: How to Use Social Media, Online Video, Mobile Applications, Blogs, News Releases, and Viral Marketing to Reach Buyers Directly, 5th Edition: David Meerman Scott
  125. E-Marketing, 7th Edition: Judy Strauss & Raymond Frost
  126. Human Anatomy, 6th Edition: Kenneth Saladin
  127. Microsoft Excel 2019 Data Analysis and Business Modeling, 6th Edition: Wayne Winston
  128. South-Western Federal Taxation 2020: Corporations, Partnerships, Estates and Trusts, 43rd Edition: William A. Raabe & James C. Young & William H. Hoffman & Annette Nellen & David M. Maloney
  129. Fundamentals of Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems, 7th Edition: R. Kent Nagle & Edward B. Saff & Arthur David Snider
  130. Brooks/Cole Empowerment Series: An Introduction to Family Social Work, 4th Edition: Donald Collins & Catheleen Jordan & Heather Coleman
  131. We The People: An Introduction to American Government, 12th Edition: Thomas Patterson
  132. As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom through Radical Resistance, 3rd Edition: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson
  133. Biology for the Informed Citizen, 1st Edition: Donna M. Bozzone & Douglas S. Green
  134. Introduction to Econometrics, 4th Edition: James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson
  135. Sources of World Societies, Volume 2, 3rd Edition: Merry Wiesner-Hanks & Patricia Buckley Ebrey & Davila Roger & Clare Crowston & John P. McKay
  136. Psychology of Sport Injury, 1st Edition: Britton W. Brewer & Charles Redmond
  137. America: A Narrative History, Volume 1, 11th Edition: David E. Shi
  138. Advocacy: Championing Ideas and Influencing Others, 1st Edition: John A. Daly
  139. Cognitive Psychology: Applying The Science of the Mind, 3rd Edition: Bridget Robinson-Riegler & Gregory L. Robinson-Riegler
  140. Collect, Combine, and Transform Data Using Power Query in Excel and Power BI, 1st Edition: Gil Raviv
  141. New Perspectives Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2019 Introductory, 1st Edition: Patrick Carey & Katherine T. Pinard & Ann Shaffer & Mark Shellman & Sasha Vodnik
  142. Charlotte Huck's Children's Literature: A Brief Guide, 3rd Edition: Barbara Kiefer & Cynthia Tyson
  143. The Fast Forward MBA in Project Management: Eric Verzuh
  144. Evidence-Based Practice for Nurses: Appraisal and Application of Research, 4th Edition: Nola A. Schmidt & Janet M. Brown
  145. Wound Management: Principles and Practices, 3rd Edition: Betsy Myers
  146. CCNA Routing and Switching Portable Command Guide, 4th Edition: Scott Empson
  147. Personality, 10th Edition: Jerry M. Burger
  148. THE LAW OF WORK: COMMON LAW AND THE REGULATION OF WORK: David Doorey
  149. Shigley's Mechanical Engineering Design, 11th Edition: Richard Budynas
  150. Molecular Biology, 3rd Edition: David P. Clark & Nanette J. Pazdernik & Michelle R. McGehee
  151. Linear Algebra With Applications, 8th Edition: Steve Leon
  152. Advocacy Practice for Social Justice, 4th Edition: Richard Hoefer
  153. Exploring Your Role in Early Childhood Education, 4th Edition: Mary Renck Jalongo & Joan Packer Isenberg
  154. Workbook for Diagnostic Medical Sonography: The Vascular System (Diagnostic Medical Sonography Series), 2nd Edition: Ann Marie Kupinski
  155. Forensic Pathology, 2nd Edition: Dominick DiMaio & Vincent J.M. DiMaio
  156. Marketing Metaphoria: What Deep Metaphors Reveal About the Minds of Consumers: Gerald Zaltman & Lindsay H. Zaltman
  157. Ethical, Legal, and Professional Issues in Counseling, 6th Edition: Theodore P. Remley & Barbara P. Herlihy
  158. Case Studies in Child and Adolescent Psychopathology, 2nd Edition: DeDe Wohlfarth & Robin K. Morgan
  159. PFIN, 7th Edition: Randall Billingsley & Lawrence J. Gitman & Michael D. Joehnk
  160. Understanding Violence and Victimization, 6th Edition: Robert J. Meadows
  161. Theory and Design for Mechanical Measurements, 6th Edition: Richard S. Figliola & Donald E. Beasley
  162. Great Demo!: How To Create And Execute Stunning Software Demonstrations, 2nd Edition: Peter E. Cohan
  163. Understanding Environmental Law, 3rd Edition: Philip Weinberg & Kevin A. Reilly
  164. Exercises for the Shoulder to Hand: Release Your Kinetic Chain: Brian James Abelson & Abelson Kamali Thara & Lavanya Balasubramaniyam
  165. Sport, Violence and Society: 2nd Edition: Kevin Young
  166. The Vascular System (Diagnostic Medical Sonography Series), 2nd Edition: Ann Marie Kupinski
  167. Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks, 1st Edition: Evan Gilman & Doug Barth
  168. The Ethics of Coaching Sports: Moral, Social and Legal Issues, 1st Edition: Robert Simon
  169. Library and Information Center Management, 9th Edition: Barbara Moran & Claudia Morner
  170. Attacking Faulty Reasoning, 7th Edition: T. Edward Damer
  171. Computer-Based Construction Project Management: Tarek Hegazy
  172. Criminal Investigation, 5th Edition: Aric W. Dutelle & Ronald F. Becker
  173. Modern Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 4th Edition: Stephen T. Thornton & Andrew Rex
  174. Essentials of Online Course Design: A Standards-Based Guide, 2nd Edition: Marjorie Vai & Kristen Sosulski
  175. Introduction to Chemistry, 5th Edition: Rich Bauer & James Birk & Pamela Marks
  176. Windows Server 2016 Unleashed, 1st Edition: Rand Morimoto & Jeffrey Shapiro & Guy Yardeni
  177. Network Security Essentials: Applications and Standards, 6th Edition: William Stallings
  178. Fundamentals of Web Development, 2nd Edition: Randy Connolly & Ricardo Hoar
  179. Reading Critically, Writing Well, 11th Edition: Rise B. Axelrod & Charles R. Cooper & Alison M. Warriner
  180. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 8th Edition: James Stewart
  181. Fast Facts for the Student Nurse: Nursing Student Success in a Nutshell, 1st Edition: Susan Stabler-Haas
  182. The Self, 1st Edition: Jonathon Brown
  183. Ordinary Differential Equations, Revised Edition: Morris Tenenbaum & Harry Pollard
  184. Global Business Today, 11th Edition: Charles W. L. Hill & G. Tomas M. Hult
  185. Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences, 3rd Edition: Mary L. Boas
  186. Experimental Design: Procedures for the Behavioral Sciences, 4th Edition: Roger E. Kirk
  187. MKTG, 4th Canadian Edition: Charles W. Lamb & Joe F. Hair
  188. Calculus of a Single Variable, 11th Edition: Ron Larson & Bruce H. Edwards
  189. Supervision in Early Childhood Education, 3rd Edition: Joseph J. Caruso & M. Temple Fawcett & Leslie R. Williams
  190. Developing Child, The: Pearson New International Edition, 13th Edition: Helen Bee & Denise Boyd
  191. The Elusive Eden: A New History of California, 5th Edition: Richard B. Rice & William A. Bullough & Richard J. Orsi & Mary Ann Irwin & Michael F. Magliari & Cecilia M. Tsu
  192. Survey of Operating Systems, 6th Edition: Jane Holcombe & Charles Holcombe
  193. International Marketing, 2nd Edition: Daniel W. Baack & Barbara Czarnecka & Donald E. Baack
  194. Data Mining for Business Analytics: Concepts, Techniques and Applications in Python, 1st Edition: Galit Shmueli & Peter C. Bruce & Peter Gedeck & Nitin R. Patel
  195. The Politics of Public Budgeting: Getting and Spending, Borrowing and Balancing, 9th Edition: Irene S. Rubin
  196. Operations Strategy, 5th Edition: Nigel Slack & Mike Lewis
  197. Digital Forensics Workbook: Hands-on Activities in Digital Forensics: Michael Robinson
  198. The Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics, 1st Edition: Leslie Francis
  199. Building Accounting Systems Using Access 2010, 8th Edition: James Perry & Richard Newmark
  200. Early Childhood Education Today, 14th Edition: George S Morrison
  201. Health and Health Care Delivery in Canada, 2nd Edition: Valerie D. Thompson
  202. Human Resource Information Systems: Basics, Applications, and Future Directions, 4th Edition: Michael J. Kavanagh & Richard D. Johnson
  203. College Algebra: Real Mathematics, Real People, 7th Edition: Ron Larson
  204. Personality Psychology, 1st Canadian Edition: Carolyn Ensley & Randy J. Larsen & David M. Buss & David King
  205. 70-740 Installation, Storage, and Compute with Windows Server 2016: Microsoft Official Academic Course
  206. Principles of Athletic Training: A Guide to Evidence-Based Clinical Practice, 16th Edition: William Prentice
  207. Consumer Behavior, 12th Edition: Leon G. Schiffman & Joseph L. Wisenblit
  208. Prealgebra, 5th Edition: Marvin L. Bittinger & David J. Ellenbogen & Barbara L. Johnson
  209. Defensive Security Handbook: Best Practices for Securing Infrastructure, 1st Edition: Lee Brotherston & Amanda Berlin
  210. Writing Tools: 55 Essential Strategies for Every Writer, 1st Edition: Roy Peter Clark
  211. Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft (Penguin Academics Series), 1st Edition: Janet Burroway
  212. Concepts of Fitness And Wellness: A Comprehensive Lifestyle Approach, 11th Edition: Charles Corbin & Karen Welk & William Corbin & Gregory Welk
  213. Interpreting Earth History: A Manual in Historical Geology, 8th Edition: Scott Ritter & Morris Petersen
  214. Counseling the Culturally Diverse: Theory and Practice, 8th Edition: Derald Wing Sue & David Sue & Helen A. Neville & Laura Smith
  215. Investment Banking: Valuation, Leveraged Buyouts, and Mergers & Acquisitions: University Edition, 2nd Edition: Joshua Pearl & Joshua Rosenbaum
  216. Essentials of Geology, 6th Edition: Stephen Marshak
  217. The Personality Puzzle, 8th Edition: David C. Funder
  218. Strategic Human Resources Planning, 7th Edition: Monica Belcourt
  219. Human Anatomy, 5th Edition: Michael McKinley
  220. First Aid for the USMLE Step 2 CS, 6th Edition: Tao Le & Vikas Bhushan
  221. Career Theories and Models at Work: Ideas for Practice: Nancy Arthur & Roberta Neault & Mary McMahon
  222. Essential Cell Biology, 5th Edition: Bruce Alberts & Karen Hopkin & Alexander D. Johnson & David Morgan & Martin Raff & Keith Roberts & Peter Walter
  223. Children Moving:A Reflective Approach to Teaching Physical Education with Movement Analysis Wheel, 9th Edition: George Graham & Shirley Ann Holt/Hale & Melissa Parker
  224. Calculus: Graphical, Numerical, Algebraic, 4th Edition: Ross L. Finney & Franklin D. Demana & Bert K. Waits & Daniel Kennedy
  225. Foundations of Clinical and Counseling Psychology, 4th Edition: Judith Todd & Arthur C. Bohart
  226. Elements of Argument: A Text and Reader, 12th Edition: Annette T. Rottenberg & Donna Haisty Winchell
  227. 5 Steps to a 5 AP Chinese Language and Culture, 1st Edition: JianMin Luo
  228. Study Guide/Solutions Manual for Organic Chemistry: Structure and Function, 8th Edition: K. Peter C. Vollhardt & Neil E. Schore
  229. Speak Up! An Illustrated Guide to Public Speaking, 4th Edition: Douglas M. Fraleigh & Joseph S. Tuman & Peter Arkle
  230. Murach's Oracle SQL and PL/SQL for Developers, 2nd Edition: Joel Murach
  231. The Communication Playbook, 1st Edition: Gamble Teri Kwal & Gamble Michael W.
  232. Managing Human Resources, 9th Canadian Edition: Monica Belcourt & Parbudyal Singh & Scott Snell & Shad Morris
  233. The One-Hour Activist: The 15 Most Powerful Actions You Can Take to Fight for the Issues and Candidates You Care About, 1st Edition: Christopher Kush
  234. Contemporary Business, 17th Edition: Louis E. Boone & David L. Kurtz & Susan Berston
  235. Introduction to Heat Transfer, 6th Edition: Theodore L. Bergman & Adrienne S. Lavine & Frank P. Incropera
  236. The Making of Environmental Law, 1st Edition: Richard J. Lazarus
  237. The Elusive Eden: A New History of California, 5th Edition: Richard B. Rice & William A. Bullough & Richard J. Orsi & Mary Ann Irwin & Michael F. Magliari
  238. Systems Analysis and Design, 12th Edition: Scott Tilley
  239. Motivational Interviewing, 3rd Edition: William R. Miller & Stephen Rollnick
  240. Excellence in Business Communication, 13th Edition: John V. Thill & Courtland L. Bovee
  241. Guide to Contract Pricing: Cost and Price Analysis for Contractors, Subcontractors, and Government Agencies, 5th Edition: John E. Murphy
  242. Wrigley Regulars: Finding Community in the Bleachers: Holly Swyers
  243. The Price Advantage, 2nd Edition: Walter L. Baker & Michael V. Marn & Craig C. Zawada
  244. Corporate Finance: The Core, 2nd Edition: Jonathan Berk & Peter DeMarzo
  245. INCOSE Systems Engineering Handbook: A Guide for System Life Cycle Processes and Activities, 4th Edition: INCOSE
  246. Absolute Java, 6th Edition, Global Edition: Walter Savitch
  247. Exploring Unseen Worlds: William James and the Philosophy of Mysticism, 1st Edition: G. William Barnard
  248. Governing States and Localities, 7th Edition: Kevin B. Smith & Alan H. Greenblatt
  249. Interviewing in Action in a Multicultural World, 5th Edition: Bianca Cody Murphy & Carolyn Dillon
  250. Advocacy in the Human Services, 1st Edition: Mark Ezell
  251. Immunology: A Short Course, 7th Edition: Richard Coico & Geoffrey Sunshine
  252. Essential Logic for Computer Science: Rex Page & Ruben Gamboa
  253. Tested Advertising Methods, 5th Edition: Caples & Hahn
  254. BIM and Quantity Surveying, 1st Edition: Steve Pittard
  255. Retail Buying: From Basics to Fashion, 6th Edition: Richard Clodfelter
  256. A Project Manager's Book of Forms: A Companion to the PMBOK Guide, 3rd Edition: Cynthia Snyder Dionisio
  257. Textbook of Histology, 4th Edition: Leslie P. Gartner
  258. Autism: A New Introduction to Psychological Theory and Current Debate, 2nd Edition: Sue Fletcher-Watson & Francesca Happé
  259. Business and Society: Stakeholders, Ethics, Public Policy, 16th Edition: Anne Lawrence & James Weber
  260. Essentials of Nursing Law and Ethics, 2nd Edition: Susan J. Westrick
  261. Financial Accounting, 10th Edition: Robert Libby & Patricia Libby & Frank Hodge
  262. Intermediate Microeconomics: A Modern Approach, 9th Edition: Hal R. Varian
  263. Financial Markets and Institutions, 6th Edition: Anthony Saunders
  264. The Cosmos: Astronomy in the New Millennium, 5th Edition: Jay M. Pasachoff & Alex Filippenko
  265. Structural Analysis, SI Edition, 6th Edition: Aslam Kassimali
  266. Understanding and Treating Chronic Shame: A Relational/Neurobiological Approach, 1st Edition: Patricia A. DeYoung
  267. Leisure Services Management, 2nd Edition: Amy R. Hurd & Robert J. Barcelona & Jo An M. Zimmerman & Janet Ready
  268. Behavioral Problems in Geography Revisited, 1st Edition: Kevin R Cox & Reginald Golledge
  269. Public Finance and Public Policy, 6th Edition: Jonathan Gruber
  270. Introduction to Heat Transfer, 6th Edition: Theodore L. Bergman & Adrienne S. Lavine & Frank P. Incropera & David P. DeWitt
  271. Frequently Prescribed Medications: Drugs You Need to Know, 3rd Edition: Michael A. Mancano & Jason C. Gallagher
  272. The Economics of Health Reconsidered, 4th Edition: Thomas Rice
  273. Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: An Integrative Approach, 2nd Edition: Elsie Jones-Smith
  274. America's History, Value Edition, Combined Volume, 9th Edition: Rebecca Edwards & Eric Hinderaker & Robert Self & James A. Henretta
  275. Campbell Biology, 11th Edition: Lisa A. Urry & Michael L. Cain & Steven A. Wasserman & Peter V. Minorsky & Jane B. Reece
  276. Advertising: Concept and Copy, 3rd Edition: George Felton
  277. Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction, 10th Edition: William D. Callister & David G. Rethwisch
  278. Understanding Business, 11th Edition: William Nickels & James McHugh & Susan McHugh
  279. Microsoft Excel 2019 Data Analysis and Business Modeling, 6th Edition: Wayne Winston
  280. Essentials of Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy, 4th Edition: Ellen Hillegass
  281. Guide to Managerial Communication, 10th Edition: Mary Munter & Lynn Hamilton
  282. You Don't Need a Title to Be a Leader: How Anyone, Anywhere, Can Make a Positive Difference: Mark Sanborn
  283. Business Communication: A Problem-Solving Approach, 1st Edition: Kathryn Rentz
  284. Leadership and Management for Nurses: Core Competencies for Quality Care, 3rd Edition: Anita Finkelman
  285. Governing California in the Twenty-First Century, 7th Edition: J. Theodore Anagnoson & Gerald Bonetto & J. Vincent Buck & James J. Kelleher
  286. Investment Valuation: Tools and Techniques for Determining the Value of Any Asset, 3rd Edition: Aswath Damodaran
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submitted by TailExpert to CollegeTextbook [link] [comments]

Inflation may grow as the US prevents negative interest rates, boosting Bitcoin bull case

One of the biggest Bitcoin catalysts over the past few months has been the introduction of negative interest rates into economies in Europe and Asia.
The idea goes that if consumers have to pay banks to hold their money, they will seek assets that provide relatively better yield. BTC fits the bill: it costs no money to hold, or it can even yield upwards of six percent yield if coins are held on a platform such as BlockFi.
Unfortunately for the Bitcoin bull case, the U.S. Federal Reserve has been hesitant to let its policy interest rate go negative. Chairman Jerome Powell said in a recent speech that negative interest rates are something the Federal Reserve is not looking at as a viable monetary policy lever.
Yet the fear is the economy will eventually demand it. That’s to say, to keep the cogs of Corporate America turning, it will need more stimulus. And that stimulus could be massive for Bitcoin.
The Federal Reserve’s target inflation rate could soon double
To respond to the ongoing recession caused by the end of the business cycle and the COVID-19 lockdowns, the Federal Reserve has been forced to take record action, dropping its policy interest rate to 0-0.25 percent just months ago.
But with the worst economic outlook in modern history as both the Bank of England and Federal Reserve have said, it may not be enough.
A 2017 study from two individuals on the Federal Reserve Board — which is arguably more relevant today than before due to the macroeconomic backdrop — found that due the tendency to keep rates and inflation near zero, economic performance will be poor. Low inflation will beget low inflation and output will be low.
So what’s the solution?
According to an op-ed authored by former Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke in 2017, a solution may be to increase the central bank’s inflation target to four percent, double the status quo of two percent inflation.
This would give the Federal Reserve more flexibility with monetary policy, especially in recessions like the one we’re going through today. It would also be relatively easy to implement, he postulated.
Bitcoin Stands to Benefit
Max Bronstein of Coinbase recently wrote in response to the Bernanke’s post that we could see another “wave of debt monetization,” whereas treasuries issue new bonds and/or central banks create money:
“IF YOU’RE WONDERING HOW THE FED IS GOING TO TRY AND STAVE OFF NEGATIVE INTEREST RATES, HERE’S A POTENTIAL PREVIEW, AUTHORED BY BEN BERNANKE HIMSELF. THE INFLATION TARGET IS GOING HIGHER, EXPECT ANOTHER WAVE OF DEBT MONETIZATION.”
It’s a trend that could benefit Bitcoin.
Paul Tudor Jones, a hedge fund billionaire, explained in a recent report that Bitcoin is the “fastest horse” in a world where there is an “unprecedented expansion of every form of money, unlike anything the developed world has ever seen.”
Tesla CEO Elon Musk has echoed this as well, writing in a recent tweet:
“ALTHOUGH MASSIVE CURRENCY ISSUANCE BY GOVT CENTRAL BANKS IS MAKING BITCOIN INTERNET MONEY LOOK SOLID BY COMPARISON.”
PRETTY MUCH, ALTHOUGH MASSIVE CURRENCY ISSUANCE BY GOVT CENTRAL BANKS IS MAKING BITCOIN INTERNET money look solid by comparison
submitted by kealenz to btc [link] [comments]

Complete Guide to All r/neoliberal Flair Personalities [J-L]

Please see the first post [A-I] for more info about this post. Unfortunately, post character limit is 40k, so I will have to break this into multiple posts linked here:

[A-I]

[J-L]

[M-P]

[Q-Z]


James Heckman
1944 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Professor in Economics at the University of Chicago. Professor at the Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies. Director of the Center for the Economics of Human Development (CEHD). Co-Director of Human Capital and Economic Opportunity (HCEO) Global Working Group. Heckman is also a Professor of Law at ‘the Law School’, a senior research fellow at the American Bar Foundation, and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.
· In 2000, Heckman shared the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences with Daniel McFadden, for his pioneering work in econometrics and microeconomics.
· As of February 2019 (according to RePEc), he is the next most influential economist in the world behind Daniel McFadden.
· Heckman has received numerous awards for his work, including the John Bates Clark Medal of the American Economic Association in 1983, the 2005 and 2007 Dennis Aigner Award for Applied Econometrics from the Journal of Econometrics, the 2005 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Achievement in Labor Economics, the 2005 Ulysses Medal from the University College Dublin, the 2007 Theodore W. Schultz Award from the American Agricultural Economics Association, the Gold Medal of the President of the Italian Republic awarded by the International Scientific Committee of the Pio Manzú Centre in 2008, the Distinguished Contributions to Public Policy for Children Award from the Society for Research in Child Development in 2009, the 2014 Frisch Medal from the Econometric Society, the 2014 Spirit of Erikson Award from the Erikson Institute, and the 2016 Dan David Prize for Combating Poverty from Tel Aviv University.
“The best way to improve the American workforce in the 21st century is to invest in early childhood education, to ensure that even the most disadvantaged children have the opportunity to succeed alongside their more advantaged peers”

Janet Yellen
1945 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Successor to Ben Bernanke, serving as the Chair of the Federal Reserve from 2014 to 2018, and as Vice Chair from 2010 to 2014, following her position as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Yellen was also Chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers under President Bill Clinton.
· Yellen is a Keynesian economist and advocates the use of monetary policy in stabilizing economic activity over the business cycle. She believes in the modern version of the Phillips curve, which originally was an observation about an inverse relationship between unemployment and inflation. In her 2010 nomination hearing for Vice Chair of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, Yellen said, “The modern version of the Phillips curve model—relating movements in inflation to the degree of slack in the economy—has solid theoretical and empirical support.”
· Yellen is married to George Akerlof, another notable economist, Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences laureate, professor at Georgetown University and the University of California, Berkeley..
· In 2014, Yellen was named by Forbes as the second most powerful woman in the world. She was the highest ranking American on the list. In October 2015, Bloomberg Markets ranked her first in their annual list of the 50 most influential economists and policymakers. In October 2015, Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute ranked Yellen #1 in the Public Investor 100 list. In October 2010, she received the Adam Smith Award from the National Association for Business Economics (NABE).
“In the long run, outsourcing is another form of trade that benefits the U.S. economy by giving us cheaper ways to do things.”
“I'm just opposed to a pure inflation-only mandate in which the only thing a central bank cares about is inflation and not unemployment.”

Jared Polis
1975 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· 43rd governor of Colorado since January 2019. Polis served on the Colorado State Board of Education from 2001 to 2007 and was the United States Representative for Colorado's 2nd congressional district from 2009 to 2019.
· Polis is the first openly gay person and second openly LGBT person (after Kate Brown of Oregon) to be elected governor in the United States.
· In 2000 Polis founded the Jared Polis Foundation, whose mission is to “create opportunities for success by supporting educators, increasing access to technology, and strengthening our community.” Polis has also founded two charter schools.
· Polis was named Outstanding Philanthropist for the 2006 National Philanthropy Day in Colorado. He has received many awards, including the Boulder Daily Camera's 2007 Pacesetter Award in Education; the Kauffman Foundation Community Award; the Denver consul general of Mexico “Ohtli”; the Martin Luther King Jr. Colorado Humanitarian Award; and the Anti-Defamation League's inaugural Boulder Community Builder Award.
“Having alternative currencies is great, right, because, historically, government's had a monopoly on currency. At the end of the day, why should only politicians—either directly or indirectly—control the currency? We can reduce transaction cost, provide an alternative, and—look, I don't know whether it'll be Bitcoin or not—but I think the concept of digital currencies is here to stay, and the fact that a politician would write to try to ban them in their infancy is just the wrong way to go about it. Let the market determine whether there's any value there or not.”

Jeff Bezos
1964 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Best known as the founder, CEO, and president of Amazon, Bezos is an American internet and aerospace entrepreneur, media proprietor, and investor. The first centi-billionaire on the Forbes wealth index, Bezos was named the “richest man in modern history” after his net worth increased to $150 billion in July 2018. In September 2018, Forbes described him as “far richer than anyone else on the planet” as he added $1.8 billion to his net worth when Amazon became the second company in history to reach a market cap of $1 trillion.
· Bezos supported the electoral campaigns of U.S. senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, two Democratic U.S. senators from Washington. He has also supported U.S. representative John Conyers, as well as Patrick Leahy and Spencer Abraham, U.S. senators serving on committees dealing with Internet-related issues.
· Bezos has supported the legalization of same-sex marriage, and in 2012 contributed $2.5 million to a group supporting a yes vote on Washington Referendum 74, which affirmed same-sex marriage.
· After the 2016 presidential election, Bezos was invited to join Donald Trump's Defense Innovation Advisory Board, an advisory council to improve the technology used by the Defense Department. Bezos declined the offer without further comment.
· In September 2018, Business Insider reported that Bezos was the only one of the top five billionaires in the world who had not signed the Giving Pledge, an initiative created by Bill Gates and Warren Buffett that encourage wealthy people to give away their wealth.
“Percentage margins don't matter. What matters always is dollar margins: the actual dollar amount. Companies are valued not on their percentage margins, but on how many dollars they actually make, and a multiple of that.”
“We have the resources to build room for a trillion humans in this solar system, and when we have a trillion humans, we'll have a thousand Einsteins and a thousand Mozarts. It will be a way more interesting place to live.”

Jens Weidmann
1968 – Present Born: Germany Resides: Germany
· German economist and president of the Deutsche Bundesbank. Chairman of the Board of the Bank for International Settlements. From 1997 to 1999, Weidmann worked at the International Monetary Fund. In 2006, he began serving as Head of Division IV (Economic and Financial Policy) in the Federal Chancellery. He was the chief negotiator of the Federal Republic of Germany for both the summits of the G8 and the G20. He was given the 2016 Medal for Extraordinary Merits for Bavaria in a United Europe.
· Weidmann was involved in a series of major decisions in response to the financial crisis in Germany and Europe: preventing the meltdown of the bank Hypo Real Estate, guaranteeing German deposits and implementing a rescue programme for the banking system, piecing together two fiscal-stimulus programmes, and setting up the Greek bail-out package and the European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF).
· In a 2011 speech, Weidmann criticized the errors and “many years of wrong developments” of the European Monetary Union (EMU) peripheral states, particularly the wasted opportunity represented by their “disproportionate investment in private home-building, high government spending or private consumption”. In May, 2012, Weidmann's stance was characterized by US economist and columnist Paul Krugman as amounting to wanting to destroy the Euro. In 2016, Weidmann dismissed deflation in light of the European Central Bank's current stimulus program, pointing out the healthy condition of the German economy and that the euro area is not that bad off.
“I share the concerns regarding monetary policy that is too loose for too long. … As you know I have concerns about granting emergency liquidity on account of the fact that the banks are not doing everything to improve their liquidity situation.”

Jerome Powell
1953 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Current Chair of the Federal Reserve, nominated by Trump. Powell has faced substantial and repeated criticism from Trump after his confirmation. The Senate Banking Committee approved Powell's nomination in a 22–1 vote, with Senator Elizabeth Warren casting the lone dissenting vote.
· Powell briefly served as Under Secretary of the Treasury for Domestic Finance under George H. W. Bush in 1992. He has served as a member of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors since 2012. He is the first Chair of the Federal Reserve since 1987 not to hold a Ph.D. degree in Economics.
· Powell has described the Fed's role as nonpartisan and apolitical. Trump has criticized Powell for not massively lowering federal interest rates and instituting quantitative easing.
· The Bloomberg Intelligence Fed Spectrometer rated Powell as neutral (not dove nor hawk). Powell has been a skeptic of round 3 of quantitative easing, initiated in 2012, although he did vote in favor of implementation.
· Powell stated that higher capital and liquidity requirements and stress tests have made the financial system safer and must be preserved. However, he also stated that the Volcker Rule should be re-written to exclude smaller banks. Powell supports ample amounts of private capital to support housing finance activities.
“The Fed's organization reflects a long-standing desire in American history to ensure that power over our nation's monetary policy and financial system is not concentrated in a few hands, whether in Washington or in high finance or in any single group or constituency.”

John Cochrane
1957 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and economist, specializing in financial economics and macroeconomics.
· The central idea of Cochrane's research is that macroeconomics and finance should be linked, and a comprehensive theory needs to explain both 1.) how, given the observed prices and financial returns, households and firms decide on consumption, investment, and financing; and 2.) how, in equilibrium, prices and financial returns are determined by households and firms decisions.
· Cochrane is the author of ‘Asset Pricing,’ a widely used textbook in graduate courses on asset pricing. According to his own words, the organizing principle of the book is that everything can be traced back to specializations of a single equation: the basic pricing equation. Cochrane received the TIAA-CREF Institute Paul A. Samuelson Award for this book.
“Regulators and politicians aren’t nitwits. The libertarian argument that regulation is so dumb — which it surely is — misses the point that it is enacted by really smart people. The fact that the regulatory state is an ideal tool for the entrenchment of political power was surely not missed by its architects.”

John Keynes (John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes)
1883 – 1946 Born: England Died: England
· British economist, whose ideas fundamentally changed the theory and practice of macroeconomics and the economic policies of governments. Originally trained in mathematics, he built on and greatly refined earlier work on the causes of business cycles, and was one of the most influential economists of the 20th century. Widely considered the founder of modern macroeconomics, his ideas are the basis for the school of thought known as Keynesian economics, and its various offshoots. Keynes was a lifelong member of the Liberal Party, which until the 1920s had been one of the two main political parties in the United Kingdom.
· During the 1930s Great Depression, Keynes challenged the ideas of neoclassical economics that held that free markets would, in the short to medium term, automatically provide full employment, as long as workers were flexible in their wage demands. He argued that aggregate demand (total spending in the economy) determined the overall level of economic activity, and that inadequate aggregate demand could lead to prolonged periods of high unemployment. Keynes advocated the use of fiscal and monetary policies to mitigate the adverse effects of economic recessions and depressions.
· Keynes's influence started to wane in the 1970s, his ideas challenged by those who disputed the ability of government to favorably regulate the business cycle with fiscal policy. However, the advent of the global financial crisis of 2007–2008 sparked a resurgence in Keynesian thought. Keynesian economics provided the theoretical underpinning for economic policies undertaken in response to the crisis by President Barack Obama of the United States, Prime Minister Gordon Brown of the United Kingdom, and other heads of governments.
· Keynes was vice-chairman of the Marie Stopes Society which provided birth control education and campaigned against job discrimination against women and unequal pay. He was an outspoken critic of laws against homosexuality. Keynes thought that the pursuit of money for its own sake was a pathological condition, and that the proper aim of work is to provide leisure. He wanted shorter working hours and longer holidays for all. Keynes was ultimately a successful investor, building up a private fortune.
“How can I accept the Communist doctrine, which sets up as its bible, above and beyond criticism, an obsolete textbook which I know not only to be scientifically erroneous but without interest or application to the modern world? How can I adopt a creed which, preferring the mud to the fish, exalts the boorish proletariat above the bourgeoisie and the intelligentsia, who with all their faults, are the quality of life and surely carry the seeds of all human achievement? Even if we need a religion, how can we find it in the turbid rubbish of the red bookshop? It is hard for an educated, decent, intelligent son of Western Europe to find his ideals here, unless he has first suffered some strange and horrid process of conversion which has changed all his values.”

John Locke
1632 – 1704 Born: England Died: England
· Known as the “Father of Liberalism,” Locke was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers. His work greatly affected the development of epistemology and political philosophy. His writings influenced Voltaire and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, many Scottish Enlightenment thinkers, as well as the American revolutionaries. His contributions to classical republicanism and liberal theory are reflected in the United States Declaration of Independence.
· Locke's political theory was founded on social contract theory. Social contract arguments typically posit that individuals have consented, either explicitly or tacitly, to surrender some of their freedoms and submit to the authority (of the ruler, or to the decision of a majority) in exchange for protection of their remaining rights or maintenance of the social order.
· Locke advocated for governmental separation of powers and believed that revolution is not only a right but an obligation in some circumstances. Locke was vehemently opposed to slavery, calling it “vile and miserable … directly opposite to the generous Temper and Courage of our Nation.”
· Locke uses the word “property” in both broad and narrow senses. In a broad sense, it covers a wide range of human interests and aspirations; more narrowly, it refers to material goods. He argues that property is a natural right and it is derived from labour aand that the individual ownership of goods and property is justified by the labour exerted to produce those goods
· According to Locke, unused property is wasteful and an offence against nature, but, with the introduction of “durable” goods, men could exchange their excessive perishable goods for goods that would last longer and thus not offend the natural law. In his view, the introduction of money marks the culmination of this process, making possible the unlimited accumulation of property without causing waste through spoilage.
“The power of the legislative, being derived from the people by a positive voluntary grant and institution, can be no other than what that positive grant conveyed, which being only to make laws, and not to make legislators, the legislative can have no power to transfer their authority of making laws, and place it in other hands.”
“No man in civil society can be exempted from the laws of it: for if any man may do what he thinks fit, and there be no appeal on earth, for redress or security against any harm he shall do; I ask, whether he be not perfectly still in the state of nature, and so can be no part or member of that civil society; unless any one will say, the state of nature and civil society are one and the same thing, which I have never yet found any one so great a patron of anarchy as to affirm.”

John Mill (John Stuart Mill a.k.a. J. S. Mill)
1806 – 1873 Born: England Died: France
· John Stuart Mill was arguably the most influential English speaking philosopher of the nineteenth century. He was a naturalist, a utilitarian, and a liberal, whose work explores the consequences of a thoroughgoing empiricist outlook. In doing so, he sought to combine the best of eighteenth-century Enlightenment thinking with newly emerging currents of nineteenth-century Romantic and historical philosophy. His most important works include System of Logic (1843), On Liberty (1859), Utilitarianism (1861) and An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy (1865).
· Mill's conception of liberty justified the freedom of the individual in opposition to unlimited state and social control. A member of the Liberal Party and author of the early feminist work The Subjection of Women (in which he also condemned slavery), he was also the second Member of Parliament to call for women's suffrage after Henry Hunt in 1832.
· Mill, an employee for the British East India Company from 1823 to 1858, argued in support of what he called a “benevolent despotism” with regard to the colonies. Mill argued that “To suppose that the same international customs, and the same rules of international morality, can obtain between one civilized nation and another, and between civilized nations and barbarians, is a grave error. ... To characterize any conduct whatever towards a barbarous people as a violation of the law of nations, only shows that he who so speaks has never considered the subject.”
· John Stuart Mill believed in the philosophy of Utilitarianism, which he described as the principle that holds “that actions are right in the proportion as they tend to promote happiness [intended pleasure, and the absence of pain], wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness [pain, and the privation of pleasure].” Mill asserts that even when we value virtues for selfish reasons we are in fact cherishing them as a part of our happiness.
· Mill's early economic philosophy was one of free markets. However, he accepted interventions in the economy, such as a tax on alcohol, if there were sufficient utilitarian grounds. Mill originally believed that “equality of taxation” meant “equality of sacrifice” and that progressive taxation penalized those who worked harder and saved more. Given an equal tax rate regardless of income, Mill agreed that inheritance should be taxed.
· His main objection of socialism was on that of what he saw its destruction of competition. According to Mill, a socialist society would only be attainable through the provision of basic education for all, promoting economic democracy instead of capitalism, in the manner of substituting capitalist businesses with worker cooperatives.
· Mill's major work on political democracy defends two fundamental principles at slight odds with each other: extensive participation by citizens and enlightened competence of rulers. He believed that the incompetence of the masses could eventually be overcome if they were given a chance to take part in politics, especially at the local level.
· Mill is one of the few political philosophers ever to serve in government as an elected official. In his three years in Parliament, he was more willing to compromise than the “radical” principles expressed in his writing would lead one to expect.
“He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them. But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion... Nor is it enough that he should hear the opinions of adversaries from his own teachers, presented as they state them, and accompanied by what they offer as refutations. He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them...he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.”
“The only freedom which deserves the name is that of pursuing our own good in our own way, so long as we do not attempt to deprive others of theirs, or impede their efforts to obtain it. Each is the proper guardian of his own health, whether bodily, or mental or spiritual. Mankind are greater gainers by suffering each other to live as seems good to themselves, than by compelling each to live as seems good to the rest.”

John Rawls
1921 – 2002 Born: United States Died: United States
· Liberal American moral and political philosopher who received both the Schock Prize for Logic and Philosophy and the National Humanities Medal in 1999, the latter presented by President Bill Clinton, who acclaimed Rawls for having “helped a whole generation of learned Americans revive their faith in democracy itself.” He is frequently cited by the courts of law in the United States and Canada.
· Rawls's most discussed work is his theory of a just liberal society, called justice as fairness. Rawls first wrote about this theory in his book A Theory of Justice. Rawls spoke much about the desire for a well-ordered society; a society of free and equal persons cooperating on fair terms of social cooperation.
· Rawls’s most important principle (the Liberty Principal) states that every individual has an equal right to basic liberties. Rawls believes that “personal property” constitutes a basic liberty, but an absolute right to unlimited private property is not.
· Rawls's argument for his principles of social justice uses a thought experiment called the “original position”, in which people select what kind of society they would choose to live under if they did not know which social position they would personally occupy.
“Justice is the first virtue of social institutions, as truth is of systems of thought. A theory however elegant and economical must be rejected or revised if it is untrue; likewise laws and institutions no matter how efficient and well-arranged must be reformed or abolished if they are unjust. Each person possesses an inviolability founded on justice that even the welfare of society as a whole cannot override. For this reason justice denies that the loss of freedom for some is made right by a greater good shared by others. It does not allow that the sacrifices imposed on a few are outweighed by the larger sum of advantages enjoyed by many. Therefore in a just society the liberties of equal citizenship are taken as settled; the rights secured by justice are not subject to political bargaining or to the calculus of social interests.”

Joseph Nye
1937 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· American political scientist and co-founder of the international relations theory of neoliberalism (a theory concerned first and foremost with absolute gains rather than relative gains to other states), developed in the 1977 book Power and Interdependence. He is noted for his notion of “smart power” (“the ability to combine hard and soft power into a successful strategy”), which became a popular phrase with the Clinton and Obama Administrations.
· Secretary of State John Kerry appointed Nye to the Foreign Affairs Policy Board in 2014. In 2014, Nye was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star in recognition of his “contribution to the development of studies on Japan-U.S. security and to the promotion of the mutual understanding between Japan and the United States.”
· From 1977 to 1979, Nye was Deputy to the Undersecretary of State for Security Assistance, Science, and Technology and chaired the National Security Council Group on Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons. In recognition of his service, he was awarded the State Department's Distinguished Honor Award in 1979. In 1993 and 1994, he was Chairman of the National Intelligence Council, which coordinates intelligence estimates for the President, and was awarded the Intelligence Community's Distinguished Service Medal. In the Clinton Administration from 1994 to 1995, Nye served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, and was awarded the Department's Distinguished Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster. Nye was considered by many to be the preferred choice for National Security Advisor in the 2004 presidential campaign of John Kerry.
· Nye has been a member of the Harvard faculty since 1964. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences and a foreign fellow of The British Academy. Nye is also a member of the American Academy of Diplomacy. The 2011 TRIP survey of over 1700 international relations scholars ranks Joe Nye as the sixth most influential scholar in the field of international relations in the past twenty years. He was also ranked as most influential in American foreign policy. In 2011, Foreign Policy magazine named him to its list of top global thinkers. In September 2014, Foreign Policy reported that the international relations scholars and policymakers both ranked Nye as one of the most influential scholars.
“When you can get others to admire your ideals and to want what you want, you do not have to spend as much on sticks and carrots to move them in your direction. Seduction is always more effective than coercion, and many values like democracy, human rights, and individual opportunities are deeply seductive.”

Karl Popper
1902 – 1994 Born: Austria-Hungary Died: England
· Karl Popper is generally regarded as one of the greatest philosophers of science of the 20th century. He was a self-professed critical-rationalist, a dedicated opponent of all forms of scepticism, conventionalism, and relativism in science and in human affairs generally and a committed advocate and staunch defender of the ‘Open Society’.
· In ‘The Open Society and Its Enemies’ and ‘The Poverty of Historicism’, Popper developed a critique of historicism and a defense of the “Open Society”. Popper considered historicism to be the theory that history develops inexorably and necessarily according to knowable general laws towards a determinate end. He argued that this view is the principal theoretical presupposition underpinning most forms of authoritarianism and totalitarianism. He argued that historicism is founded upon mistaken assumptions regarding the nature of scientific law and prediction. Since the growth of human knowledge is a causal factor in the evolution of human history, and since “no society can predict, scientifically, its own future states of knowledge”, it follows, he argued, that there can be no predictive science of human history. For Popper, metaphysical and historical indeterminism go hand in hand.
· Popper is known for his vigorous defense of liberal democracy and the principles of social criticism that he believed made a flourishing open society possible. His political philosophy embraced ideas from major democratic political ideologies, including socialism/social democracy, libertarianism/classical liberalism and conservatism, and attempted to reconcile them.
“Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them. In this formulation, I do not imply, for instance, that we should always suppress the utterance of intolerant philosophies; as long as we can counter them by rational argument and keep them in check by public opinion, suppression would certainly be most unwise. But we should claim the right to suppress them if necessary even by force; for it may easily turn out that they are not prepared to meet us on the level of rational argument, but begin by denouncing all argument; they may forbid their followers to listen to rational argument, because it is deceptive, and teach them to answer arguments by the use of their fists or pistols. We should therefore claim, in the name of tolerance, the right not to tolerate the intolerant. We should claim that any movement preaching intolerance places itself outside the law, and we should consider incitement to intolerance and persecution as criminal, in the same way as we should consider incitement to murder, or to kidnapping, or to the revival of the slave trade, as criminal.”

Lawrence Summers
1954 – Present Born: United States Resides: United States
· American economist, former Vice President of Development Economics and Chief Economist of the World Bank, senior U.S. Treasury Department official throughout President Clinton's administration, Treasury Secretary 1999–2001, and former director of the National Economic Council for President Obama (2009–2010). Summers served as the 27th President of Harvard University from 2001 to 2006. Current professor and director of the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.
· As a researcher, Summers has made important contributions in many areas of economics, primarily public finance, labor economics, financial economics, and macroeconomics. Summers has also worked in international economics, economic demography, economic history and development economics.[ He received the John Bates Clark Medal in 1993 from the American Economic Association. In 1987, he was the first social scientist to win the Alan T. Waterman Award from the National Science Foundation. Summers is also a member of the National Academy of Sciences.
· In 1983, at age 28, Summers became one of the youngest tenured professors in Harvard's history. In 2006, Summers resigned as Harvard's president in the wake of a no-confidence vote by Harvard faculty. Summers viewed his beliefs on why science and engineering had an under-representation of women to be a large part in the vote, saying, “There is a great deal of absurd political correctness. Now, I'm somebody who believes very strongly in diversity, who resists racism in all of its many incarnations, who thinks that there is a great deal that's unjust in American society that needs to be combated, but it seems to be that there is a kind of creeping totalitarianism in terms of what kind of ideas are acceptable and are debatable on college campuses.”
· As the World Bank's Vice President of Development Economics and Chief Economist, Summers played a role in designing strategies to aid developing countries, worked on the bank's loan committee, guided the bank's research and statistics operations, and guided external training programs. The World Bank's official site reports that Summer's research included an “influential” report that demonstrated a very high return from investments in educating girls in developing nations. According to The Economist, Summers was “often at the centre of heated debates” about economic policy, to an extent exceptional for the history of the World Bank in recent decades.
· In 1999 Summers endorsed the Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act which removed the separation between investment and commercial banks. In February 2009, Summers quoted John Maynard Keynes, saying “When circumstances change, I change my opinion”, reflecting both on the failures of Wall Street deregulation and his new leadership role in the government bailout.
submitted by learnactreform to neoliberal [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Critic Peter Schiff Wins a Bet for a Gold Coin About Interest Rates - He Predicted Correctly 7 Months Into Future

TL;DR: Schiff won a bet made January 20, 2019 about interest rates which were lowered today for the first time since 2008.
Video Proof: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZFWL4FLic4
Many have seen the name Peter Schiff crop up around cryptocurrency forums, mostly related to his steadfast belief crypto can't work. People may wonder why he's important. The title is the reason.
While most here would disagree with Peter Schiff on Bitcoin, many (like myself) completely agree with him on other things, like politics, economics, and central banks and their policies. What just happened today demonstrates, in impressive fashion, why people like Schiff (economic adviser to Ron Paul's 2008 presidential campaign) command respect.
What Happened
The U.S. Federal Reserve embarked on unprecedented monetary policy in response to the Great Recession of 2008, lowering interest rates and pumping money into the system to avert a further drop in economic activity. The head of the Fed at the time, Ben Bernanke, gave no indication he saw the collapse coming in contrast to people like Peter Schiff (and others like Mike Maloney) who warned a large economic problem was coming soon. In other words, Peter went against mainstream beliefs at the time.
Peter just won a bet today doing the same thing. Making today's news is the announcement the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates. It's significant for two reasons. First, it's the first time this has happened since 2008, over ten years ago! Second, as recently as the beginning of the year not only did nobody expect the Fed to cut rates in 2019, they expected the opposite, rate hikes and more than one hike. Peter's bet was the equivalent of betting on a horse given the worst odds in a race, but ending up winning.
Additionally, Peter gave his thoughts about gold prices. At that time in January gold was at about $1,280 per ounce. The panelist Peter bet against said he believed gold would go down in the coming months to around $1,000. Peter, however, said he thought that it was a slim likelihood gold would go back down to $1,000 and even slim it would go below $1,200. He was right again. Today gold is just over $1,400 per ounce.
Follow Peter Schiff here: https://www.youtube.com/useSchiffReport
submitted by cryptos4pz to btc [link] [comments]

Charity Drive Donation Incentives and Pledges MegaThread

Donations are live!

CLICK HERE to donate to the Against Malaria Foundation

Individual incentives:
Mod sponsored group incentives:
Community drive group incentives:
Any users who would like to submit pledges for this charity drive, please comment below and we will add them to this master list. Reminder: Users who do not complete pledges will be banned.
submitted by MrDannyOcean to neoliberal [link] [comments]

The Case for XRP in 2018

Cryptocurrencies have grown exponentially not only in price this past year but also in public awareness and popular attention. The novel feeling to an emerging financial and technological market is reminiscent of the rise of the Internet with its innovative potential. In turn, a heightened collective societal awareness of this new innovative potential has led to a change in the nature of the market dynamics of cryptocurrencies. As Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle posits, “The observation of a phenomenon changes the phenomena itself.” The observation of thousands of young millennials, and now middle-aged investors, will only accelerate the rise of cryptocurrencies as times goes on.
Today, we are seeing the real-world effects of a newfound intrigue into cryptocurrencies. This new interest is causing a narrowing of the divergence between truth and fiction over accurate knowledge about cryptocurrencies. The force drawing this gap narrower each day is an increased dissemination of truthful information that has generated legions of individual investors into new cryptocurrency markets; in particular, Ripple’s XRP.
As the public expands its understanding of Ripple’s XRP, the capital inflow from both individual and institutional investors combined will likely grow to levels that will exponentially grow the liquidity of XRP and, as a byproduct, its price.
Here, in this report, I will provide an overview and analysis of Ripple’s XRP and the implications Q4 2017 and the year 2018 and beyond hold for the future of XRP and its price.
THE CONCEPT: WHAT IS XRP?
XRP is the digital asset used by Ripple to offer financial institutions an option for liquidity to conduct cross-border payments. It is predominantly used for Ripple’s solution for the minimization of liquidity costs. In contrast to most other cryptocurrencies, XRP’s application here features a real-world applicability that extends to real-world transactions. It is used for the xRapid solution provided by Ripple, and is the only one of the three solutions Ripple offers (The others are xCurrent and xVia) that employs the use of XRP.
THE RATIONALE: WHY XRP?
There is a myriad of factors that distinguish XRP from other cryptocurrencies and establish it as a forerunner to what may become the dominant cryptocurrencies in the years that lie ahead.
Cost: Comparatively, XRP has the lowest cost per transaction at $0.0004. In contrast, BCH is $0.26, LTC is $0.37, DASH is $0.64, ETH is $0.96, and BTC is $28.23.
Scalability: XRP can handle over 1,500 transactions per second whereas BCH can handle 24 per second, LTC can handle 56 per second, DASH can handle 10 per second, ETH can handle 16 per second, and BTC can handle 24 per second.
Speed: XRP can conduct transactions at a rate of 3 seconds per transaction, BCH at a rate of 58 minutes per transaction, LTC at 17 minutes per transaction, DASH at 15 minutes per transaction, ETH at 2 minutes per transaction, and BTC 1 hour and 6 minutes per transaction.
XRP’s availability is ever-expanding. It is currently available on over 50 exchanges including Bitstamp, Bithumb, Bittrex, Binance, Bitfinex, Kraken, and Poloniex. The volume of XRP availability is, in addition, in an expansionary phase. The primary location of exchange volume is concentrated in Asia; in particular, South Korea. However, as mainstream media attention increases, so will American interest as well. There already have been tell-tale signs indicative in news outlets that have covered Ripple recently in the wake of XRP’s rise in CNBC, Bloomberg, Forbes, Investopedia, and Yahoo Finance.
Simply consider the mania generated by the media attention to Bitcoin. Repetitive news stories featured on CNBC, Bloomberg, CNN, CBS, and other mainstream media news outlets. Countless articles disparaging it as a bubble and hailing it as a force that could deconstruct the financial apparatus governed by the Federal Reserve and other central banks. Now, consider the results of media attention directed towards the substantive information behind XRP. Once news segments and articles are shown and written that illustrate the comparative superiority of XRP to other cryptocurrencies, then the viewers and readers will likely flock to XRP in pursuit of acquiring a tried, tested, and proven cryptocurrency with real-world usage.
In turn, a virtuous circle intensifying capital inflow to XRP is predictable and probably to occur. We can expect FOMO to rise and a number of oscillations up and down for the price to unfold. Nevertheless, the price of XRP is bound to not only remain but rather accelerate its demonstrated upwards price trajectory pushing us to new heights.
Additionally, if the collective fear among cryptocurrency investors materializes, that is, if new regulations are imposed on our activities, then Ripple is stand to likely gain. Dr. Nassim Nicholas Taleb, a scholar and risk analyst writes about a concept called “Antifragility.” Antifragility is a term used to describe things that gain from disorder. Considering Ripple’s ties to financial institutions and regulators, it wouldn’t be too far-off to speculate that XRP is positioned to gain if such a black swan event were to occur.
FURTHER REASONS TO ADVANCE THE CASE FOR XRP:
Financial institutions, renown investors, and accomplished financiers have already taken notice of XRP. Former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke has advocated on Ripple’s behalf. Zoe Cruz, former president for institutional securities and wealth management at Morgan Stanley and former global head of fixed income, commodities, and foreign exchange has joined Ripple’s Board of Directors. She has been named to Forbes list of Most Powerful Women for three years straight.
Perhaps most notably, a consortium of 61 banks – organized by SBI Ripple Asia – will be adopting Ripple’s technology to settle transactions between its members with the eventual goal of applying XRP to usage. Mr. Yoshitaka Kitao, the CEO, Executive Chairman, and President has publicly stated, “Forget about bitcoin, we’re all in on XRP!” In fact, SBI has already confirmed that XRP will be put in usage in Spring 2018. If successful, expect the price to reflect it.
Moreover, TechCrunch Founder Michael Arrington has, as of November 2017, announced a $100 million XRP hedge fund. His efforts have already raised $50 million which will engender a ripple effect of new large net-worth individual and institutional investors. The entity will be called Arrington XRP Capital and new information about its activities are set to be released in the months that lie ahead.
Also, David Schwartz, Ripple’s Chief Cryptographer, has said that there are two major “household” companies (Not financial institutions) that will be announced in Q4. This is likely to provide a substantial boon to XRP.
Finally, the Chief Technology Officer of Ripple, Stefan Thomas, has said that in 2018 there will be a “big push on XRP.” For years, Ripple has kept a relative silence in expressing the superiority of XRP. 2018 will be different. 2018 is bound to be Ripple’s year. I expect the price to rise as high as $10 and as low as $4.
At any rate, this report only scratches the surface of Ripple and XRP’s potential. For far more nuanced and in-depth analysis and information, I suggest reading from Ripple firsthand at www.ripple.com and perusing the best blog on XRP itself at https://xrphodor.wordpress.com/
To the moon, we go.
SOURCE: https://cellardoorway.com/2017/12/24/the-case-for-ripples-xrp-a-brief-overview/
submitted by OttoVonBismarck- to Ripple [link] [comments]

Why I'm dumping hundreds of thousands of EUR into BTC instead of stocks, gold, bank deposits or cash

I've been reading up on bitcoin heavily since the wake-up call that was the cyprus banking crises in march 2013. Up to that point I had most of my financial assets in bank deposits, 5% in physical gold, and less than 5% in cash in eur, although we have our own brand of toilet paper: lev (bgn) tied to a fixed exchange rate to eur since 1997 (1 eur = ~ 2BGN). during 1997 bulgaria was going through a huge currency crises with 1 USD reaching 3000 BGN, state pensions going down to $5-10 monthly, salaries of teachers and doctors $20-30 and general mayhem for the 8mil. population at that time as the State was stealing whatever foreign paper currency (usd, deuthche marks mostly) through manipulation of the currency exchange. Since then there has been a currency board established, erasing three zeros from the exchange rate and a newly designed paper money we are still using. The hyperinflation was like a jubilee for all debt holders and a menace for everyone that had savings in local money and not quick enough to convert into other assets. People could by real estate back then for less than $2000-3000 that now easily cost $50-60k!
17 years later, almost a generation later, into 2014 and another crises is looming ahead as we just had 3th (first investment bank) and 4th largest (bulgarian corporate bank) banks going through bank runs, with the 4th totally frozen since june 20th and the 3rd receiving billions in liquidity to contain the run on deposits. Both banks are among the few left among the 30 operating banks with bulgarian owners which are perceived as highly corrupt. Corporate bank had 6.5bil (3.25bil eur) in assets and has been closed for all its clients as more than 4.5bil are supposedly "missing" through suspicious credits to an inner circle of businesses associated with local party mafia rulers and the bank owners themselves - outright criminal ponzi that was backed by the State, as it had deposited money from large energy companies in Corporate bank to keep its capital requirements within the legal threshold. Now the party rulers are pondering the "idea" of covering all deposits through issuing bonds for all citizens to pay through taxes, even those above 100k eur supposedly protected by law, as to "save" it turns out a lot of deputies in the parliament, prosecutors, judges, famous artists, and the general ruling "elite" who have been collecting 8-9% annual interest for the last 10 years through deposits with maturity every 4 months! From here on I expect things are going to deteriorate badly and with an accelerating force as the local rulers seem to be bent over on raping the country financially for saving their own ass, which is to be expected worldwide as centralization always breeds corruption.
After the cyprus bank crises, I started dumping bigger chunks of bank money for larger amounts of gold bullion at once, as a hedge against all the political stupidity that seems inevitable when shtf, guaranteed to happen in the current financial system worldwide. Then the news started gaining steam about the rise of BTC during april and it was the first time I started putting hours a day in reading on the subject of what this fuss about BTC was all about. Few days later I was hooked to BTC like on the hardest drugs available on the market! Still, did not buy any, but started spreading the gospel that is the decentralized nature of crypto to all my friends and through heavy spam on facebook. It took me 2 months before I pumped up my partners to accept BTC in the online businesses that I am a cofounder of, with 3 in the Top 100 by daily traffic and 1 in Top 10 in online commerce by revenue. We were the first major sites in BG (june 2013) to accept BTC and doing some excessive marketing on behalf of BTC through huge onsite ads, special rates for btc payments, special badges ala foursquare for btc users, special and highly attractive subscription packages only available for btc, allowing users with site credits to convert them into btc, putting out blog posts on the subject, giving away bonuses to our employees only in btc and so on. Since accepting BTC we have never converted them back into paper money and keep 100% which turned out to be highly profitable, as we have made 5x the amount just by speculating on the rising price of BTC in contrast to any paper money. We are now going to promote BTC further by giving away BTC to our users for certain tasks and promotions. All of my partners are now invested in btc, buying in btc, building an atm, and very acceptive of whatever initiative that we could put out to further spread btc among our 2.5mil. registered combined user base in a country of 4.5mil. total internet users :-)
Yet, it took me another 4 months in octover 2013 to start buying BTC with my own saved-up money, as I felt highly confident of where I believe BTC is headed, especially after the run on the price thanks to the unlikely culprit ben bernanke's speech in the congress hearing. Ever since then I've been accumulating BTC first by slowly to feel confident of all the security needed to be exercised towards btc long term holdings, then almost daily and now dumping ever larger amounts of fiat paper into btc until I reach a threshold of no more than 25-30% of my assets to be converted into BTC. I've been buying through all the price ups and downs since 10.2013 and am resolved to hold hard for the future no matter the monthly fluctuations. I see BTC as even a greater hedge during turmoil than gold, as BTC can not be stopped by any capital controls, which indians are learning the hard way since their rulers imposed heavy duties on import/export on gold since march 2013.
I'm confident that bitcoin can weather the storms coming its way being upgradable, needing truly global democratic consensus, being deflationary in an ever more inflationary brands of toilet papers, easy to protect from state actors that look up for miniscule reasons to confiscate or put levy on personal wealth, easy to transport and live by on its own as daily more exchanges and businesses are opening up worldwide, gaining more confidence as a store of value and alternative to bank deposits which are easy pray to bank criminality or the unpredictable market forces that can obliterate depositors relying on 3rd party wealth preservation, the best form of payment for the huge knowledge-based economy and workers worldwide that can finally become totally mobile thanks to internet and decentralized money, accelerating remittance opportunities, great store of value in times of ever increasing state authoritarianism under the weight of sovereign debt explosion and rising social promises that need to be backed by real assets and especially people who are ever more mobile and hard to tax to death as internet+bitcoin turns the planet in a highly competitive marketplace for tax-purposes as to what the different offerings of state rulers are. Looking what is heating in the middle east, west vs russia, currency debasement of the world reserve currency worse than during times of world wars, it's not hard to predict than btc has not way to go but up, even if the nsa tries their best to subvert it, the People will find a way to fix it!
submitted by srebrin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

TIL Bitcoin is controlled by central bankers.

Digital Currency Group owns BlockStream which controls Bitcoin Core. The controllers of DCG are old school central bankers which is why Bitcoin is shit now. If you are a bitcoin holder please sell for Bitcoin Cash. Make these people lose all their money plz. (this is a cut and paste from another post on /BTC)
http://dcg.co/who-we-are/#board-members
  1. Glenn Hutchins: Former Advisor to President Clinton. Hutchins sits on the board of The Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where he was reelected as a Class B director for a three-year term ending December 31, 2018. Vice-Chairman of Brookings Institue. On advisory board with Ben Bernanke and Hank Paulson.
  2. Barry Silbert: CEO of Digital Currency Group, (funded by Mastercard) who is also an Ex investment Banker at Houlihan Lokey. This is the guy who thought SW2x was a good idea.
  3. Lawrence H. Summers: "Board Advisor" "Chief Economist at the World Bank from 1991 to 1993. In 1993, Summers was appointed Undersecretary for International Affairs of the United States Department of the Treasury under the Clinton Administration. In 1995, he was promoted to Deputy Secretary of the Treasury under his long-time political mentor Robert Rubin. In 1999, he succeeded Rubin as Secretary of the Treasury. While working for the Clinton administration Summers played a leading role in the American response to the 1994 economic crisis in Mexico, the 1997 Asian financial crisis, and the Russian financial crisis. He was also influential in the American advised privatization of the economies of the post-Soviet states [a massive FUD campaign that caused Russian citizens to sell their shares in public companies - these shares were purchased by Oligarch bankers with ties to Western Banks], and in the deregulation of the U.S financial system, including the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Summers
  4. Blythe Masters: "Former executive at JPMorgan Chase.[1] She is currently the CEO of Digital Asset Holdings,[2] a financial technology firm developing distributed ledger technology for wholesale financial services.[3] Masters is widely credited as the creator of the credit default swap as a financial instrument. She is also Chairman of the Governing Board of the Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Project, member of the International Advisory Board of Santander Group, and Advisory Board Member of the US Chamber of Digital Commerce." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blythe_Masters
thanks Scott_WWS: https://www.reddit.com/CryptoCurrency/comments/7cdg79/each_side_accuses_the_other_of_being_centralized/
EDIT: Their greed cost the US approx $22 Trillion. This is much bigger than Roger Ver & some miners in China vs Bitcoin Core. What is at stake is the future of the global economy.
EDIT 2:

TL;DR Bitcoin was created in response to the 2008/2009 Global Financial Crisis. Bitcoin (BTC) is now controlled by those who were instrumental in creating the crisis. (By "crisis" I mean theft of billions (trillions?!) of dollars)

submitted by outbackdude to conspiracy [link] [comments]

A Crypto Fix for a Broken International Monetary System

The international monetary system is broken. Helping to fix it poses a huge opportunity for the cryptographers behind cryptocurrency and blockchain technology.
Now they have one of the stewards of that system in their corner: Mark Carney, the outgoing Bank of England Governor.
A week ago in Jackson Hole, Mont., Carney told the Federal Reserve’s annual gabfest that central bankers could develop a network of national digital currencies to create a new, basket-managed “synthetic hegemonic currency.”
Carney’s proposal was mostly a thought exercise to inspire conversation around solutions to the dangerous imbalances fostered by the current system’s dependence on the dollar as the world’s reserve currency. The specifics were necessarily thin – any solution will be both technically and politically complicated, and even though he’ll depart the BOE in January, Carney’s status as a public official demands caution.
But I don’t share those constraints. So, let me lay out my own modest proposal for a cryptocurrency-based fix to a broken global financial system. Hint: it is not “buy bitcoin.”
I’m neither a trained economist nor a cryptographer, so I know this act of hubris will attract naysayers. I welcome criticisms and suggestions. I’m also quite certain I’m not the first to think of this, so I’m eager to hear of others working on similar projects.
The thing is I’ve been obsessed with both the structural failings of the global financial system and cryptocurrency for many years now. Three of my five books have covered those topics. It’s hard to bite my tongue.

Fixing the global currency system

I think that instead of creating a whole new global currency, central bankers should work to develop digital currency interoperability. We need a system of decentralized exchange through which businesses in different countries can use smart contracts to create automated escrow agreements and protect themselves against exchange rate volatility. With algorithms that achieve atomic swaps now available and with other advances in cross-chain interoperability, I believe we’ll soon have the technology to remove foreign exchange risk from international trade without relying on an intermediating currency such as the dollar.
Here’s how it might work: A hypothetical importer in Russia could strike a deal with an exporter from China and agree to a future payment, denominated in Chinese renminbi, based on the latter’s prevailing exchange rate with the Russian ruble. Relying on an interoperability protocol that’s commonly integrated into each party’s preferred digital national currency – either in privately run stablecoins or central bank-issued digital currencies – the two firms could then establish a smart contract that “trustlessly” locks up the required renminbi payment in decentralized escrow. If delivery and contract fulfillment are confirmed, the payment is released to the Chinese exporter. If not, the funds revert to the Russian importer at the same, initial conversion rate.
In this scenario, both parties are protected against adverse exchange rate movements. Yet, despite the trust gap between them, there is no need to intermediate the payment through dollars, and no need for either party to take out a forward contract, FX option or some other expensive exchange rate hedge.
Of course, the importer would suffer the opportunity cost of locking up otherwise valuable working capital for a few months. But private banks could mitigate that with collateralized short-term loans on terms that would be a lot cheaper than the current cost of currency hedging. Alternatively, if the smart contract is executed on a proof-of-stake blockchain, the locked-up funds could be employed to earn cryptocurrency staking rewards.
What would central banks’ roles be?
Well, for one, they could backstop the entire credit and/or staking model. Providing liquidity or guarantees to banks’ trade finance businesses would be a more constructive use of domestic money supply than applying it to rainy-day funds of U.S. Treasuries and other dollar assets.
Secondly, they’d be charged with assuring the trustworthiness of the interoperability protocol. Whether central banks would endorse and regulate privately developed protocols such as Tendermint’s Cosmos, Parity Technologies’ Polkadot or Ripple’s Interledger, or whether they would commission a multilateral body to build and manage a single official system, there’s no getting around an oversight role for public sector policymakers.
(Don’t worry, crypto libertarians, no one’s taking away your bitcoin in this scenario. In fact, since central bankers will retain their own monetary sovereignty, with exchange rates continuing to fluctuate, bitcoin’s appeal as a “digital gold” alternative to domestic currencies could well be enhanced.)

A broken system

Let’s be clear: if foreign trade no longer requires dollar intermediation, the U.S.-centric global economy will suffer a massive impact, perhaps bigger even than the 1971 “Nixon Shock,” when the dollar was unpegged from gold.
The entire reserve currency system, in which foreign central banks own U.S. government bonds as a backstop and multinational companies hold large parts of their balance sheets in dollars, is based on the need to protect against exchange rate losses. If that risk is removed, the edifice would, in theory, come down.
Yet, as Carney rightly points out, continuing with dollar hegemony is not tenable, either. The system is broken. Whenever global investors get the jitters they rushen masse into “safe haven” dollar assets – even when, as with President Trump’s trade war with China, U.S. policy is the cause of their malaise.
This process, which has become progressively more acute with each financial crisis, causes huge distortions, economic dysfunction and political turmoil. And with economies slowing and the worldwide value of bonds carrying negative yields now at $17 trillion, we now face worrying signs of another crisis. This time, traditional central bank policy could be powerless.
When another crisis comes, the dollar-based system will generate a predictable vicious cycle. The dollar will rapidly rise. This will hurt U.S. exporters, which further stir the mercantile instincts of anti-free traders such as Trump and fuel risks of a destructive tit-for-tat currency war.
Meanwhile, emerging markets will suffer capital flight as a rising dollar raises the risk of debt defaults in those countries. Their central banks will respond by jacking up interest rates to prop up their domestic currencies, but this will choke their economies at a time when they require easier, not tighter, monetary policy. Unemployment will surge and governments will topple.
The current system breeds what former Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke dubbed the “global savings glut” as developing countries squirrel money into dollar reserves that could otherwise be used for domestic development.
In the U.S., it creates the countervailing effect of massive deficits – in other words, sky-high debt. Far from being the “exorbitant privilege” once described by French Finance Minister Valéry Giscard d’Estaing, the dollar’s reserve status is an American curse. It creates artificially low U.S. interest rates, which misprices credit risks and fuels bubbles – see: the 2008 housing crisis.
Worst of all, the dollar system undermines democracy and diminishes economic sovereignty. The performance of every economy hinges on U.S. Federal Reserve policies. Yet the Fed’s low inflation/maximum employment mandate is defined only by the U.S. economic outlook. This policy mismatch makes it much harder for governments to pursue effective measures to create opportunities for all.
When things really go sour, the Fed belatedly and reluctantly becomes the world’s lender of last resort, pumping dollars into the world’s banks via their New York subsidiaries. That’s how we ended up with the “quantitative easing” surfeit after the last crisis, money that went into financial assets, London real estate and fine art, but did little to boost the earning power of the middle class.
These policy failures have bred a populist backlash against globalization, manifest in the U.K.’s Brexit crisis and President Trump’s adversarial trade policies. Yet the reality is that capital flows are more globalized than ever and increasingly beating to the drum of the U.S. dollar.
So, yes, we need change. The question is how and in what time frame?

Violent or managed change?

The solution I described could be adopted abruptly and disruptively or it could be cooperatively managed for a smoother transition.
Under the first scenario, let’s consider Russia and China, the two countries I deliberately chose for my explanatory example, since they are believed to be further ahead than most in developing fiat digital currencies. Both would love to do away with dollar dependence. Could they go it alone and jointly devise a bilateral, cross-chain smart contract between a digital renminbi and a digital ruble? Sure. Would other countries follow suit? Maybe. Such an uncontrolled retreat from dollars could do huge harm to the U.S. and the overall global economy.
That’s why I think central banks should heed Carney’s call and work together on a solution. They could coordinate the gradual introduction of digital currencies, selectively managing access and applying differential interest rates to discourage an exodus from shaky banks. They could also charge the IMF with seeking a global standard for cross-chain interoperability.
Regardless, the disruptive technologies behind digital currencies, stablecoins and decentralized exchanges will advance. It’s a ticking time bomb.
Some central bankers, led by Carney – and now, Philadelphia Fed President Patrick Harker, who said in a Wharton Business School podcast that stablecoins are “inevitable” – get it. Others need to learn fast.
Mark Carney image via Twocoms / Shutterstock.com
submitted by lordofhippos to CryptoCurrencyLive [link] [comments]

A Look at DCG & Bitfury's Incestuous Ties With the U.S. Government

Peter Todd Tweet in 2014: https://archive.is/vKZ9C
[email protected] I gotta say, looks really bad legally how Austin Hill's been negotiating deals w/ pools/etc. to get control of hashing power.
Board of Digital Currency Group
Glenn Hutchins
Advisory Board
Larry Summers
DCG of course is an investor in both Blockstream and BTCC.
DCG's money comes from:
DCG also owns Coindesk.
BTCC and Bitfury are the only two large mining pools who are outspoken in their support of Bitcoin Core.
The Bitfury Group Leadership to Present at Clinton Global Initiative (https://archive.is/MWKee)
Full Video (Begins at 32:00)
“The Bitfury Group is proud to be the world’s leading full service Blockchain technology company, we are deeply honored to represent this innovation to an audience of extremely dedicated game-changers, and we look forward to highlighting our company’s groundbreaking ‘Blockchain for global good’ work at such an important event, said Smith. “From the White House to the Blockchain, I know this technology has the power to deliver inclusion and opportunity to millions, if not billions, of people around the world and I am so grateful to work for a company focused on such a principled vision.”
Bitfury Lightning Implementation
  • In partnership with a French firm called ACINQ (http://acinq.co)
  • ACINQ is a subsidiary of the larger ACINQ Financial Services
  • CoinTelegraph: Bitfury Lightning Network Successfully Tested With French Bitcoin Company
  • TEAM: https://archive.is/Q5CNU
  • ACINQ’s US Headquarters is in Vienna, Virginia, a small town of only 16,000. Why would a global financial firm choose to locate here? -- Feeder community into Washington, D.C. Has an orange line metro stop. -- Located in Fairfax County, VA. -- The US Federal Government is the #2 largest employer -- Booz Allen Hamilton (NSA front company) is #6 largest employer -- In fact, most of the top employers in Fairfax County are either US Federal Gov’t or companies that provide services to Federal Government -- The county is home to the headquarters of intelligence agencies such as the Central Intelligence Agency, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and National Reconnaissance Office, as well as the National Counterterrorism Center and Office of the Director of National Intelligence.
Chairman: Avinash Vashistha
CEO: Chaman Baid
CSO: Nandan Setlur
  • https://www.linkedin.com/in/nandansetlur https://archive.is/wp3L0
  • From 1986-1993 he worked for Information Management Consultants (imc) Ltd as a Technical Consultant with various federal government agencies. McLean, Virginia
  • 1993-2000 Technical Consultant for Freddie Mac, in McLean Virginia
  • From 2000-2007, President of InterPro Global in Maryland
  • From 2011-2012, Director of VibbleTV in Columbia, Maryland
  • From 2008-Present has been Executive Director at ACINQ and Managing Partner at Vine Management, both in Vienna, Virginia.
BitFury Enhances Its Advisory Board by Adding Former CFTC Chairman Dr. James Newsome and Renowned Global Thought Leader and President of the Institute for Liberty and Democracy Hernando de Soto (Businesswire)
Bitfury Board of Directors
Robert R Dykes
The other board members include two Bitfury founders, and an investor.
Bitfury Advisory Board
James Newsome
  • Ex-chairman of CFTC
  • Dr. Newsome was nominated by President Clinton and confirmed by the Senate to be at first a Commissioner and later a Chairman of CFTC. As Chairman, Newsome guided the regulation of the nation’s futures markets. Additionally, Newsome led the CFTC’s regulatory implementation of the Commodity Futures Modernization Act of 2000 (CFMA). He also served as one of four members of the President’s Working Group for Financial Markets, along with the Secretary of the Treasury and the Chairmen of the Federal Reserve and the SEC. In 2004, Newsome assumed the role of President and Chief Executive Officer of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) where he managed daily operations of the largest physical derivatives exchange in the world. Dr. Newsome is presently a founding partner of Delta Strategy Group, a full-service government affairs firm based in Washington, DC.
Hernando de Soto
  • Hernando de Soto heads the Institute for Liberty and Democracy, named by The Economist one of the two most important think tanks in the world. In the last 30 years, he and his colleagues at the ILD have been involved in designing and implementing legal reform programs to empower the poor in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and former Soviet nations by granting them access to the same property and business rights that the majority of people in developed countries have through the institutions and tools needed to exercise those rights and freedoms. Mr. de Soto also co-chaired with former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright the Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor, and currently serves as honorary co-chair on various boards and organizations, including the World Justice Project. He is the author of “The Other Path: the Economic Answer to Terrorism”, and his seminal work “The Mystery of Capital: Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else.”
  • Frequent attendee at Davos World Economic Forum
  • Frequent Speaker @ Clinton Global Initiative http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2ytfrs https://archive.is/MWKee
  • Criticisms: -- In his 'Planet of Slums'[104] Mike Davis argues that de Soto, who Davis calls 'the global guru of neo-liberal populism', is essentially promoting what the statist left in South America and India has always promoted—individual land titling. Davis argues that titling is the incorporation into the formal economy of cities, which benefits more wealthy squatters but is disastrous for poorer squatters, and especially tenants who simply cannot afford incorporation into the fully commodified formal economy. -- An article by Madeleine Bunting for The Guardian (UK) claimed that de Soto's suggestions would in some circumstances cause more harm than benefit, and referred to The Mystery of Capital as "an elaborate smokescreen" used to obscure the issue of the power of the globalized elite. She cited de Soto's employment history as evidence of his bias in favor of the powerful. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2000/sep/11/imf.comment http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/hey_wait_a_minute/2005/01/the_de_soto_delusion.html
Tomicah Tilleman
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tomicah_Tillemann
  • Dr. Tomicah Tillemann is Director of the Bretton Woods II initiative. The initiative brings together a variety of long-term investors, with the goal of committing 1% of their assets to social impact investment and using investments as leverage to encourage global good governance. Tillemann served at the U.S. State Department in 2010 as the Senior Advisor on Civil Society and Emerging Democracies to Secretary Hillary Clinton and Secretary John Kerry. Tillemann came to the State Department as a speechwriter to Secretary Clinton in March 2009. Earlier, he worked for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, where he was the principal policy advisor on Europe and Eurasia to Committee Chairmen, Senators Joe Biden and John Kerry. He also facilitated the work of the Senate's Subcommittee on European Affairs, then chaired by Senator Barack Obama. Tillemann received his B.A. magna cum laude from Yale University. He holds a Ph.D. with distinction from the School for Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University (SAIS) where he also served as a graduate level instructor in American foreign policy. http://live.worldbank.org/node/8468 https://archive.is/raDHA
  • Secretary Clinton appointed Tomicah Tillemann, Ph.D. as the State Department’s Senior Advisor for Civil Society and Emerging Democracies in October 2010. He continues his service under Secretary Kerry.
  • Mr. Tillemann and his team operate like venture capitalists, identifying ideas that can strengthen new democracies and civil society, and then bring together the talent, technology and resources needed to translate promising concepts into successful diplomacy. He and his team have developed over 20 major initiatives on behalf of the President and Secretary of State.
  • Mr. Tillemann came to the State Department as a speechwriter to Secretary Clinton in March 2009 and collaborated with her on over 200 speeches. Earlier, he worked for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, where he was the principal policy advisor on Europe and Eurasia to Committee Chairmen, Senators Joe Biden and John Kerry. He also facilitated the work of the Senate's Subcommittee on European Affairs, then chaired by Senator Barack Obama. Mr. Tillemann’s other professional experience includes work with the White House Office of Media Affairs and five U.S. Senate and Congressional campaigns. He was a reporter with Reuters New Media and hosted a commercial radio program in Denver, Colorado. http://m.state.gov/md160354.htm https://www.newamerica.org/our-people/tomicah-tillemann/ https://archive.is/u2yF0
  • Director of “Bretton Woods II” initiative at New America Foundation Bretton Woods was an international summit that led to the creation of the IMF and the IBRD, one of five members of The World Bank
Jamie Smith
Jason Weinstein
Paul Brody (no longer appears on site, and his LinkedIn has no mention of Bitfury, but he is mentioned in a Press Release
  • https://www.linkedin.com/in/pbrody
  • Ernst & Young since 2015 as “Americas Strategy Leader”, “Global Innovation Leader”, and “Solution Leader”
  • Prior to E&Y, he was an executive at IBM since 2002
New America Foundation
Muskoka Group
[note: this is worthy of much more research]
  • https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-08-29/blockchain-s-backers-embark-on-campaign-to-improve-its-image
  • Don Tapscott, co-author of the book “Blockchain Revolution,” hosted the meeting with his son and co-author Alex Tapscott at his family’s summer compound in Lake of Bays, Ontario. The group included some of blockchain’s biggest backers, including people with ties to IBM and JPMorgan. They considered ways to improve the governance and oversight of the technology behind the digital currency bitcoin as a way to fuel the industry’s growth. They included Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation; Brian Behlendorf, executive director of the Hyperledger Project, a blockchain supporter group that includes International Business Machines Corp., Airbus Group SE and JPMorgan Chase & Co.; and Ana Lopes, board member of the World Wide Web Foundation. Participants with blockchain industry ties include former deputy White House press secretary Jamie Smith, now chief global communications officer of BitFury Group Ltd., and Joseph Lubin, founder of startup Consensus Systems.
Blockchain Delegation Attends Democratic National Convention https://archive.is/k16Nu
Attendees:
Jamie Smith — The Bitfury Group & Blockchain Trust Accelerator Tomicah Tillemann— New America Foundation & Blockchain Trust Accelerator Alex Tapscott— co-author: Blockchain Revolution Brian Forde — MIT, Digital Currency Initiative
Brian Forde
  • Was the founding director of the MIT Digital Currency Initiative -Left his 4 year post as White House Senior Advisor for Mobile and Data Innovation to go directly to the MIT DCI
  • Brian Forde has spent more than a decade at the nexus of technology, entrepreneurship, and public policy. He is currently the Director of Digital Currency at the MIT Media Lab where he leads efforts to mainstream digital currencies like Bitcoin through research, and incubation of high-impact applications of the emerging technology. Most recently he was the Senior Advisor for Mobile and Data Innovation at the White House where he spearheaded efforts to leverage emerging technologies to address the President’s most critical national priorities. Prior to his work at the White House, Brian founded one of the largest phone companies in Nicaragua after serving as a business and technology volunteer in the Peace Corps. In recognition of his work, Brian was named a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum and one of the ten most influential people in bitcoin and blockchain. https://www.linkedin.com/in/brianforde https://archive.is/WjEGU
Alex Tapscott
World Economic Forum
  • Strategic Partners: https://www.weforum.org/about/strategic-partners
  • Includes Accenture (See Avinash Vashistha), Allianz, Deloitte (Scaling Bitcoin platinum sponsor, Blockstream Partner), Citigroup, Bain & Company (parent of Bain Capital, DCG investor), Dalian Wanda Group (working on blockchain technology), Ernst & Young (see Paul Brody), HSBC (Li-Ka Shing, Blockstream investor, used to be Deputy Chairman of HSBC), IBM, KPMG International, Mastercard (DCG Investor), PwC (Blockstream partner, also sponsor of Scaling Bitcoin)
  • Future of Financial Services Report [PDF] The word “blockchain” is mentioned once in this document, on page 23 (http://i.imgur.com/1SxyneJ.png): We have identified three major challenge areas related to innovation in financial services that will require multi-stakeholder collaboration to be addressed effectively. We are launching a project stream related to each area, with the goal of enabling tangible impact.... Decentralised systems, such as the blockchain protocol, threaten to disintermediate almost every process in financial services
  • The Steering Group who authored the report is a who’s who of the global financial elite. (Pages 4 & 5) http://i.imgur.com/fmYc1bO.png http://i.imgur.com/331FaX6.png
Bitfury Washington DC Office
Washington DC Office 600 Pennsylvania Avenue Suite 300 Washington, D.C. 20003
http://bitfury.com/contacts https://archive.is/ugvII
Bitfury Chosen for Ernst & Young Blockchain Startup Challenge
Deloitte Unveils Plan to Build Blockchain-Based Digital Bank http://www.consultancy.uk/news/12237/deloitte-unveils-plan-to-build-blockchain-based-digital-bank https://archive.is/UJ8Q5
submitted by 5zh8FoCiZ to btc [link] [comments]

TIL Blockstream is controlled by ex-JP Morgan, Federal Reserve, Mastercard Banksters. Spread the word.

http://dcg.co/who-we-are/#board-members
  1. Glenn Hutchins: Former Advisor to President Clinton. Hutchins sits on the board of The Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where he was reelected as a Class B director for a three-year term ending December 31, 2018. Vice-Chairman of Brookings Institue. On advisory board with Ben Bernanke and Hank Paulson.
  2. Barry Silbert: CEO of Digital Currency Group, (funded by Mastercard) who is also an Ex investment Banker at Houlihan Lokey. This is the guy who thought SW2x was a good idea.
  3. Lawrence H. Summers: "Board Advisor" "Chief Economist at the World Bank from 1991 to 1993. In 1993, Summers was appointed Undersecretary for International Affairs of the United States Department of the Treasury under the Clinton Administration. In 1995, he was promoted to Deputy Secretary of the Treasury under his long-time political mentor Robert Rubin. In 1999, he succeeded Rubin as Secretary of the Treasury. While working for the Clinton administration Summers played a leading role in the American response to the 1994 economic crisis in Mexico, the 1997 Asian financial crisis, and the Russian financial crisis. He was also influential in the American advised privatization of the economies of the post-Soviet states [a massive FUD campaign that caused Russian citizens to sell their shares in public companies - these shares were purchased by Oligarch bankers with ties to Western Banks], and in the deregulation of the U.S financial system, including the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Summers
  4. Blythe Masters: "Former executive at JPMorgan Chase.[1] She is currently the CEO of Digital Asset Holdings,[2] a financial technology firm developing distributed ledger technology for wholesale financial services.[3] Masters is widely credited as the creator of the credit default swap as a financial instrument. She is also Chairman of the Governing Board of the Linux Foundation’s open source Hyperledger Project, member of the International Advisory Board of Santander Group, and Advisory Board Member of the US Chamber of Digital Commerce." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blythe_Masters
thanks Scott_WWS: https://www.reddit.com/CryptoCurrency/comments/7cdg79/each_side_accuses_the_other_of_being_centralized/
EDIT: Their greed cost the US approx $22 Trillion. This is much bigger than Roger Ver & some miners in China vs Bitcoin Core. What is at stake is the future of the global economy.
EDIT 2:

TL;DR Bitcoin was created in response to the 2008/2009 Global Financial Crisis. Bitcoin (BTC) is now controlled by those who were instrumental in creating the crisis. (By "crisis" I mean theft of billions (trillions?!) of dollars)

submitted by outbackdude to btc [link] [comments]

Greg Maxwell has now publicly confessed that he is engaging in deliberate market manipulation to artificially suppress Bitcoin adoption and price. He could be doing this so that he and his associates can continue to accumulate while the price is still low (1 BTC = $570, ie 1 USD can buy 1750 "bits")

https://archive.is/55VtA#selection-301.128-301.394
Greg Maxwell: If you imagine that everyone in the world would wake up tomorrow and know in their heart of hearts that bitcoin would be the true reserve currency of the world, then this would not be good news. The result would be war. People would fight over the supply of bitcoin.
The above statement is a surprisingly revealing admission by Gregory Maxwell (self-appointed dictator of Bitcoin monetary policy CTO of Blockstream, and architect of the Core stalling scaling road-map signed by 57 devs and wannabe devs).
It is quoted from the transcript of the invite-only, semi-transparent (manually transcribed, not recorded) Fed meeting private meeting between Core/Blockstream devs and Chinese miners, held in Silicon Valley on July 30-31, 2016.
There is only one way that a trader (or a regulator!) would interpret the above statement by Gregory Maxwell nullc, where he (perhaps inadvertently but) openly admits that he is trying to prevent a free market where "people would fight over the supply of bitcoin".
Greg's statement constitutes a clear and damning admission of attempted market manipulation, as typically used for activities such as insider trading, and front-running - which are illegal in regulated markets.
Greg Maxwell has now publicly admitted that he is attempting to artificially suppress Bitcoin adoption and price, in the short term.
Maybe he is doing this so that he and his associates can continue to accumulate while the price is still low (1 BTC = $570, ie 1 USD can buy 1750 "bits" - where 1 BTC = 1'000'000 "bits").
Or maybe Greg - and his buddy Adam Back, President of Blockstream - could simply be doing this for any number of reasons related to their ignorance of how economics and politics actually work with open-source currencies.
Either way, this kind of centralized market manipulation is outrageous.
It should not be tolerated in any market in a publicly traded asset - whether regulated or unregulated.
By the way, as we all know, the total supply of Bitcoin is 21 million BTC, or 21 trillion "bits" - which is similar to total money supply for many other measures of currency or wealth (ie, in the tens of trillions of units).
And as we also know, many measures of total world currency or wealth are also in this same range: around 10s of trillions of units (ie: dollars, etc.).
This suggests that (for people who, in Greg's words, already "know in their heart of hearts that bitcoin would be the true reserve currency of the world"), the current price of 1 USD = 1750 "bits" (market-manipulated by Greg Maxwell) is ridiculously low - ie, it's a "steal".
So, people who are currently "short" on bitcoin (ie, they want to buy more), might be thankful for Greg Maxwell's market manipulation - where he is exploiting his position as self-appointed dictator of Bitcoin Blockstream CTO, to engage in central planning in order to manipulate the market, by artificially suppressing Bitcoin adoption and price a while longer (by forcing his "tiny-blocks" approach on everyone: the notorious 1 MB "max blocksize") - simply because he can and he wants to.
Meanwhile, in a regulated market, this sort of blatant centralized "insider influence" on a publicly traded asset class or currency would be illegal.
The only reason Blockstream is able to get away with this kind of crime bullshit is because Bitcoin is unregulated - and the only people who can stop them at this point is us: the Bitcoin community.
For the record, I believe the following:
  • Government interference with Bitcoin would be wrong.
  • Market manipulation of Bitcoin, by artificially suppressing adoption and price, as practiced by Greg Maxwell, is also wrong.
  • The Bitcoin community can and should regulate itself - by letting the free market determine things like what code to run, what "max blocksize" (if any) to adopt - which will in turn naturally determine Bitcoin adoption and price.
So, this public admission of market manipulation by Greg Maxwell constitutes yet another reason why the community should reject his attempt to become some kind of self-appointed dictator for Bitcoin.
Specifically, we can and should use other code (not developed by Greg Maxwell and his minions at Core/Blockstream) which does not impose an artificial 1 MB "max blocksize" - which repeated studies have shown is far below the blocksize supported by our current technology (which would be up to up to 4 MB according to the Cornell study - or even 20 MB, using u/Peter__R's proposed "Xthin" approach).
For additional background, below are 3 previous posts from last week, regarding Core/Blockstream's centralized, behind-the-scenes manipulation of Bitcoin adoption and price:
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4vfkpthe_fedfomc_holds_meetings_to_decide_on_money/
The Fed/FOMC holds meetings to decide on money supply. Core/Blockstream & Chinese miners now hold meetings to decide on money velocity. Both are centralized decision-making. Both are the wrong approach.
Having a "max blocksize" effectively imposes a "maximum money velocity" for Bitcoin - needless central economic planning at its worst.
We should not be waiting for insider information from Ben Bernanke or Janet Yellen or some creepy scammer named u/btcdrak or some economically clueless kid like u/maaku7 in order to determine how our financial system operates.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4vgwe7/so_on_the_expiration_date_of_the_hk_stalling/
So, on the expiration date of the HK stalling / non-scaling non-agreement, Viacoin scammer u/btcdrak calls a meeting with no customer-facing businesses invited (just Chinese miners & Core/Blockstream), and no solutions/agreements allowed, and no transparency (just a transcript from u/kanzure). WTF!?
Bitcoin's so-called "governance" is being hijacked by some anonymous scammer named u/btcdrak who created a shitcoin called Viacoin and who's a subcontractor for Blockstream - calling yet another last-minute stalling / non-scaling meeting on the expiration date of Core/Blockstream's previous last-minute stalling / non-scaling non-agreement - and this non-scaling meeting is invite-only for Chinese miners and Core/Blockstream (with no actual Bitcoin businesses invited) - and economic idiot u/maaku7 who also brought us yet another shitcoin called Freicoin is now telling us that no actual solutions will be provided because no actual agreements will be allowed - and this invite-only no-industry no-solutions / no-agreements non-event will be manually transcribed by some guy named u/kanzure who hates u/Peter__R (note: u/Peter__R gave us actual solutions like Bitcoin Unlimited and massive on-chain scaling via XThin) - and as usual this invite-only non-scaling no-solutions / no-agreements no-industry invite-only non-event is being paid for by some fantasy fiat finance firm AXA whose CEO is head of the Bilderberg Group which will go bankrupt if Bitcoin succeeds. What the fuck?!?
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4vl65n/remember_when_bitcoin_was_to_be_ruled_by_math_not/
Remember when Bitcoin was to be ruled by "math not men"? Whether you support bigger or smaller blocks, and whether you're "short" Bitcoin (you want the price to go down, so you can buy), or "long" (you want the price to go up, so you can sell) - you should still support decentralized governance.
...
The potential for manipulation
In the past, I've communicated with several experienced old-time traders and consultants from Wall Street regarding Bitcoin.
And many of them say they won't touch Bitcoin with a ten-foot pole because it's quite obvious to them that (in the absence of regulation), a new asset class like Bitcoin is horribly vulnerable to all sorts of behind-the-scenes manipulation.
They've seen it all before. They know all the ins and outs of how people with "insider information" can rig the market - and they can already see plenty of warning signs and alarm bells showing how easy it would be to pull off this kind of market manipulation in Bitcoin.
...
A handful of insiders can easily manipulate this "max blocksize" number - deciding whether and when and how it will get changed, and how much, and how often - so they could potentially manipulate the price - depending on their own personal preferences.
...
Is there a solution?
As you can see from all of the above, the main problem facing Bitcoin right now is centralized governance.
Of course, code inevitably does have to be (centrally) written by someone.
But there are things we can do right now to minimize the amount of centralized intervention in Bitcoin's code and governance.
Whenever possible, we can and should favor code which requires a minimum of centralized interference.
Core/Blockstream have basically spent the past year or two tying themselves up in knots, and disrupting the community and the market - and maybe even suppressing the price - due to their stubborn, selfish, destructive refusal to provide parameterized code where the market can set certain values on its own - most notably, the "maximum blocksize".
Meanwhile, code such as Bitcoin Unlimited (and also Bitcoin Classic, once it adopts BitPay's Adaptive Blocksize Limit) puts the "governance" for things like "max blocksize" back where it belongs - in the hands of the users, in the marketplace.
Using more-parameterized code is an obvious technique known by anyone who has taken a "Programming 101" course.
Everyone knows that parameterized code is the easiest way to let the market set some parameters - avoiding the dangers of having these parameters set behind closed doors by a centralized cartel of powerful people.
We can and should all work together to make this a reality again - by adopting more-parameterized code such as Bitcoin Unlimited or Bitcoin Classic.
This will allow us to realize the original promise of Bitcoin - where "The Users and the Market Decide - Not Central Planners."
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Decoding The Elite Plan For The World Economy - Mike Maloney On Federal Reserve Strategy Ron Paul Owns Ben Bernanke in 10 seconds The Trillion Dollar Cryptocurrency  Vechain Bernanke takes on critics: 'None of that has happene... Bernanke:

Bernanke has often been critical of bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and just like many mainstream bankers, he is confident of the underlying technology. The ex-Fed chair, who led the $16 trillion bailouts of too-big-to-fail corporations in the 2008 financial crisis, spoke of the current broken payments infrastructure. Former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke has weighed in on Bitcoin, expressing optimism over its potential as a payments technology but pessimistic over its prospects as a currency. He made his comments to online business news publication Quartz, which interviewed him following the release of his recent book, The Courage to Act. All the latest breaking news on Ben Bernanke. Browse The Independent’s complete collection of articles and commentary on Ben Bernanke. Subscribe now Bitcoin price: exchange rate soars above Former Fed Chairs Ben Bernanke and Janet Yellen warned that the U.S. economic recovery from the coronavirus shock could be slow and uneven and said the central bank may opt to cap yields on Former Federal Reserve chairman Ben Bernanke warns that bitcoin has “serious problems” and while the digital currency is "interesting from a technological point of view," it’s far from ready to be replacement for traditional currency.

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Decoding The Elite Plan For The World Economy - Mike Maloney On Federal Reserve Strategy

#Vechain #Cryptocurrency #Blockchain What is Vechains token utility that gives it value? Vechains token Utility model consists of two currencies ($VET & $VT... You’ll recall that Ben Bernanke was the head of the US Federal Reserve in 2002. He made a speech at the National Economist Club, titled “Deflation: Making Sure It Doesn’t Happen Here.” Watch NBC News NOW Live - July 16 NBC News 9,887 watching Live now Trump Wears a Mask & The White House Goes After Fauci The Daily Social Distancing Show - Duration: 8:54. Bernie Sanders, Alan Greenspan and Ron Paul - Monetary Policy 02-27-2002 - Duration: 15:01. Separation of Corporation and State 39,857 views Filmmaker and activist Bill Still joins Gary Franchi to weigh in on Ben Bernanke's recent statements on Bitcoin and also shares his thoughts on cryptocurrencies.