PGA Championship Odds, Betting Favorites, Contenders and

PGA Sports Betting Picks for Travelers Championship

PGA Sports Betting Picks from CheatSheetPros!
TRAVELERS CHAMPIONSHIP
QUICK NEWS AND NOTES:
I want to start off by saying this is a LOADED field on an easy course. These golfers are going to low once again. Look for golfers who have been hot recently, accurate and have a shot to get inside the top 10. Some of the “long shots” that I’m posting I don’t think they are actually going to win but I think they can be in the top 10 going into the last round and that allows me to cover my bets on some of the other guys. So we want to consider these “blanket bets”. For example, saw you have Carlos Ortiz at 165:1 odds and he ends day 3 in 4th place. The top 4 golfers are running away with it then you can use some of the future money in the 165:1 ticket to cover the other golfers that are competing. $10 at 165:1 odds pays $1,650 so that gives you some wiggle room and a good sweat. I just don’t bet golfers that are +900 in a tough field on an easy course.
ABRAHAM ANCER 20/1– He is only 20:1 and that is the lowest I’m going to go this week, although I also like Justin Rose at 25:1, Ancer comes in 15th in T2G, 24th in approach and 10th in proximity from 150-175 yards which makes up the majority of approach shots this week. In his last 3 events he has finished 2nd, 14th and 7th. He also took 8th here last year. He should have a good run this week and hopefully he will be contending on the final day.
COLLIN MORIKAWA 30/1 – Currently at 30:1 he is great on accuracy courses but he can’t put to save his life. He is 4th in T2G, 1st in approach and 8th in proximity 150-175. Before his slide last week he had finished 2nd and 9th in his prior 2 tournaments. He is getting close to a win and someone that can hopefully hang in and contend on the final day.
PAUL CASEY 35/1– So he is just now getting back in the swing of things but he loves this course. He ranks 10th in T2G, 3rd in approach and 11th in total proximity. He has 4 top 5 finishes here in 5 years and that other finish was a 17th.
JOAQUIN NIEMAN 40/1 – 17th in T2G, 17th in approach and his proximity numbers are solid with a 19th in 150-175, 4th in 175-200 and 1st in 125-150. He took 5th here last year and is playing solid golf right now coming off a 5th place and 32nd place finish. He had a chance to contend list week and this slid down. Odds are to good to pass up.
VICTOR HOVLAND 45:1 – Now we are getting up into some juicy paydays! 11th in T2G, 4th in approach and 10th in total proximity. His last 4 finishes are solid with a 21st, 23rd, 11th and 3rd.
MARC LEISHMAN 45:1 – Another 45:1 shot that I like. 21st in T2G, 6th in approach and his proximity stats for the 150-175, 175-200 and 200+ are 22nd, 18th and 1st. Wow! He has history here putting up a 21st place in 2018, cut in 2017 then 17th, 9th and 39th. He obviously does well with the course but has limited rounds under his belt after the covid layoff.
JOEL DAHMAN 65:1 – When sorting our DFS cheatsheet by the golfers who are performing well vs. the average PGA golfer Joel Dahmen comes in at #3 behind Bryson DeChambeau and Justin Thomas. He is +2.24 strokes per round better over his L20 rounds than the average golfer. He sits at 8th in T2G, 10th in approach and 5th in total proximity. He has a 48th and 19th place over his last two tournaments but prior to that he had back to back 5th place finishes. If he can get hot and contend on the last day he would be a great guy to have at 65:1 odds!
BRIAN HARMAN 65:1 – So he originally was not on my radar until I started to dig deeper. After looking at the stats I was not impressed with 67th in T2G, 85th in approach and 43rd in proximity. However, he has finished 8th and 6th here the last two years. Prior to those two years he was 35th, cut and 3rd place. So he has 3 top 8 finishes in 5 years and back to back top 8s in the last two years. I’ll take a shot at that for 65:1 odds.
DEEP DARTS – These are guys you definitely want to cover your bet if they are contending in the final round.
MAX HOMA 85:1 – I wish his odds were a little higher for me and in your sportsbook they likely are. Max Homa is playing at +1.68 strokes better than the average golfer over his last 20 rounds. He has made 85% of his cuts and in his last 4 tournaments he has finished 41st, cut, 24th and 5th. Again, he is a longshot in this field and not my favorite deep dart but someone worth mentioning.
DOC REDMAN 135:1 – Now we are getting over 100:1 and I love those darts because you can’t really lose anything with some sprinkles on these guys. Doc has made 13 of 17 cuts for 76%. He has decent stat numbers ranking 29th in T2G, 21st in approach and 14th in total proximity AND he is ranked 3rd in the 150-175 range. He has never played this course but his last 3 outings he has finished 21st 58th and 62nd. He is one of my favorite long shots here!
CARLOS ORTIZ 165:1 – Can we go higher than 135:1? YES! Yes we can with Carlos Ortiz at 165:1! Carlos is 33rd in T2G, 32nd in approach and 27th in total proximity. He took 17th here in 2015 and was cut in 2014 and 2018. He is coming off a solid 33rd place finish last week where he was quietly climbing the leaderboard for awhile.
RECAP FOR “PICKS TO WIN”
I’m not saying to bet on all of these guys, these are just guys that are on my radar. Each person has their own picks and strategy and I’m simply just pointing out a few that you might have been considering and maybe this will put you over the edge on a guy. I’m also looking at a round 4 cheatsheet for DFS and also for sports betting picks so stay tuned!
submitted by CheatSheetProscom to sportsbetting [link] [comments]

[OC] Who's in line to make the 2020 Olympic Field?

So with the end of the FedEx Cup Playoffs, we’re entering the slow part of the golf season, which means it’s the perfect time to look at the standings for Olympic Qualifying for the Tokyo Games. Olympic Qualifying ends on June 22nd and will take the Top 60 players in the Official World Golf Standings (OWGR), with each country getting a maximum of two slots, unless they have more than two players in the Top 15, which in case they can send a maximum of four players. These rules are fairly simple to follow if you aren’t following this wordy explanation, you’ll see how it works as I go along. I’ll be going continent-by-continent grading players on the likelihood that they’ll qualify. A “Virtual Lock” means they’re almost guaranteed to make the Olympics. Someone “On The Inside Track” means they will likely make the Olympics if they continue their form of play in the future. A “Bubble Boy” is someone on the edge of qualifying that needs to pick up the pace to ensure their spot or else they're at the mercy of others playing bad, and finally an “outside shot” has a small chance but needs either a watershed victory and/or declines from people above them to make the Olympic Field.
North America:
Canada: INSIDE TRACK: Adam Hadwin (currently 68th in the world), Corey Conners (71). OUTSIDE SHOT: Mackenzie Hughes (191), Roger Sloan (207), Nick Taylor (255)
Anyone in the top 2 for Canada will be comfortably in the Top 60, the only question is who will get it. Hadwin and Conners are the clear favorites with both of them being in the Top 100 in the world, but a PGA tour win from any of the other three could challenge them. Conners went from 196th in the world to 80th with his win in Texas this year, a win of similar caliber could propel one of Hughes, Sloan or Taylor into Olympic Qualifying contention. It’s still very hard and probably won’t happen, but there’s still a chance, which is why I’m including them here.
Mexico: VIRTUAL LOCK: Abraham Ancer (37). BUBBLE BOY: Carlos Ortiz (239). OUTSIDE SHOT: Roberto Diaz (398), Jose de Jesus Rodriguez (480).
Being a Top 50 player from a weaker golf country like Mexico puts Ancer firmly in the Tokyo Field. At the moment Ortiz would qualify as one of the last players in, but some good finishes on the PGA Tour would help him secure their spot. Both of the outside shots are competing for their Tour Cards in the Korn Ferry Tour Finals right now and will still likely get some PGA Tour starts next year, but will really need to capitalize on them to get to a spot to surpass Ortiz and be among the Top 60 qualifiers.
Puerto Rico: OUTSIDE SHOT: Rafael Campos (474). Campos just got his Tour card by finishing in the Top 25 in the Korn Ferry Tour season. He’s one of the longest shots on this list but just one good finish on the PGA Tour could change this and get him to Tokyo.
USA: VIRTUAL LOCK: Brooks Koepka (1). INSIDE TRACK: Dustin Johnson (3). BUBBLE BOY: Justin Thomas (5), Patrick Cantlay (7), Tiger Woods (8), Xander Schauffele (9), Bryson Dechambeau (10). OUTSIDE SHOT: Tony Finau (12), Webb Simpson (14), Patrick Reed (16), Gary Woodland (17), Rickie Fowler (19), Matt Kuchar (20).
The US is so competitive and the rankings change week-to-week, it’s very hard to predict who the top 4 Americans will be in 6 months. Even still Koepka is the most dominant player in terms of OWGR standings since prime Tiger, with his amazing season this year he’s a sure lock to at the very least be in the top 4 Americans. DJ has dropped his form in recent months (he hasn’t finished better than 20th since the May) but still had a comfortable lead in OWGR over the fourth spot that I feel confident that he will make the Olympic squad. The other two spots are a tossup and a marquee win by the five bubble boys could push them into the field. The outside shots probably need at least two PGA wins in the next 10 months to get them into the Top 4 for the US, which is a tall task.
South America:
Argentina: VIRTUAL LOCK: Emiliano Grillo (67). BUBBLE BOY: Nelson Ledesma (228)
Grillo has been a steady Top 100 player in the world for the past five years, the current best South American player and 2016 Olympian is a lock for 2020. Ledesma will be a PGA Tour rookie and is in the virtual Tokyo field as of right now but will need to sustain his position on the major circuit to stay there.
Brazil: OUTSIDE SHOT: Adilson da Silva (359).
Brazil’s 2016 Olympian needs to have some good finishes on the African Tour if he wants to return to the Olympic stage.
Chile: VIRTUAL LOCK: Joaquin Niemann (83). OUTSIDE SHOT: Huge Leon (498)
The young Chilean rallied hard the last two months of the season to comfortably retain his PGA Tour card, and will be a sure thing to make the Olympics. Leon is projected just outside the Top 110 of the European Tour Order of Merit, which is the cutoff point for a full European Tour Card, but a good result or two could secure is card, which would help tremendously to get into the Olympic Field
Colombia: ON THE INSIDE TRACK: Juan Sebastian Munoz (193). OUTSIDE SHOT: Nicolas Echavarria (475), Marcelo Rozo (503)
Munoz just barely held onto his Tour card by finishing 124th in the FedEx Cup, but still needs to hold steady to ensure his spot in the Olympics. The other two are struggling in the Korn Ferry Tour finals right now and likely won’t get their card unless they have good showings in the next two weeks, it will be an uphill battle for both of them to get inside the Top 250 in the world to try and sneak into the Olympic Field
Paraguay: BUBBLE BOY: Fabrizio Zanotti (235).
The European Tour vet will keep his card for the foreseeable future, but will need to pick up the pace to return to the Olympic Field. He’s hasn’t had a Top 25 finish since the Maybank Championship in March and only two Top 10 finishes since last February. He’s floating just inside the field for now, but not for long if he doesn’t improve
Venezuela: VIRTUAL LOCK: Jhonattan Vegas (113).
Jhonny Vegas had a lackluster year for his standards but still remains one of the few consistent Top 100 caliber players from South America and no other Venezuelan comes close to him. He will be in the Olympics.
Europe:
Austria: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Bernd Wiesberger (41). BUBBLE BOYS: Sepp Straka (184), Matthias Schwab (213).
Wiesberger, currently second in the Race to Dubai, has gone from out of the field to lock this summer with two wins. Straka and Schwab will compete on opposite sides of the Atlantic for the second Austrian spot, though if they both underperform Wiesberger could be the only one to make it.
Belgium: VIRTUAL LOCK: Thomas Pieters (84). INSIDE TRACK: Thomas Detry (161). OUTSIDE SHOT: Nicolas Colsaerts (343)
Pieters has been the best Belgian for years and that likely won’t change soon. Colsaerts represented Belgium in 2016 but has been struggling as of late and has fallen way outside the Olympic field. Detry will likely hold on to that spot unless Colsaerts sees a resurgence.
Denmark: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Lucas Bjerregaard (53), Thorbjorn Olesen (64).
These two Danes are the only two in the Top 200 in the world, they should be easy locks into the Tokyo field next year.
Finland: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Mikko Korhonen (108). BUBBLE BOYS: Kalle Samooja (300), Kim Koivu (315). OUTSIDE SHOT: Tapio Pulkkanen (376)
Korhonen, a winner on the European Tour at the China Open, should be in the Tokyo field. Samooja and Koivu, both rookies on the European Tour this year, are currently on the outside looking in but could easily get their way into the field with some good results that would also help them maintain their tour cards.
France: BUBBLE BOYS: Benjamin Hebert (97), Mike Lorenzo-Vera (100), Romain Langasque (105). OUTSIDE SHOT: Alexander Levy (171), Victor Perez (174), Antoine Rozner (189).
This is one of the juiciest races in the world. Three Frenchmen occupy an eight place gap and only two can make it to Tokyo. All three of them have been having good years, right now placing 13th, 32nd, and 19th, respectively in the Race to Dubai. We could be in for an incredibly tight race, or one or two of these guys could shoot lights out and ease into the Olympics. The outside shots could sneak it in if they get a couple of good results, but overtaking two of the three might be a difficult task.
Germany: VIRTUAL LOCK: Martin Kaymer (95). BUBBLE BOYS: Maximillian Kieffer (281), Stephan Jaeger (313).
The former No.1 player in the world has fallen off a cliff in recent years but some decent results recently has secured his spot in the Olympic field. Kieffer is the last person in the virtual field as of today and Jaeger is right behind him, both of them need to play better to get Germany off this precarious spot. Of the two I give Kieffer the better chance of making it to Tokyo, he should keep his European Tour card whereas Jaeger lost his PGA Tour card and has missed the cut in both KFT Finals events.
Great Britain: VIRTUAL LOCK: Justin Rose (4). INSIDE TRACK: Tommy Fleetwood (13). BUBBLE BOYS: Paul Casey (18). OUTSIDE SHOT: Matthew Fitzpatrick (29), Matt Wallace (30) Ian Poulter (32),
Rose is a Top 4 player in the world and will easily be within the Top 15 in the world even if multiple Brits somehow jump him. Fleetwood and Casey will battle it out for second place, but as long as both of them finish in the Top 15 in the world, they could both make it. I feel like Fleetwood is the favorite of the two, so I ranked him slightly higher. The other three need a solid win or two to try and bump themselves into the Top 15 in the world.
Ireland: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Rory McIlroy (2), Shane Lowry (21). The current FedEx Cup Champion and Open Champion are clear favorites to represent Ireland in the Olympics, other Irish and Northern Irish golfers will likely need at least three major tour victories to have a shot at surpassing their OWGR totals, which won’t happen.
Italy: VIRTUAL LOCK: Francesco Molinari (11). BUBBLE BOYS: Andrea Pavan (76), Guido Migliozzi (110).
Molibot has been a lock to be the Italian representative since his Open win last year. Pavan and Migliozzi are the only other Italians inside the Top 300 in the world, the 40 place gap could easily be covered by Migliozzi in the next ten months. Pavan is definitely the favorite but the gap is close enough that I’m labeling them both bubble boys
Netherlands: VIRTUAL LOCK: Joost Luiten (90). INSIDE TRACK: Darius van Driel (150). OUTSIDE SHOT: Daan Huizing (363).
Similar to Belgium's case, Luiten has been on the top of Dutch golf for years. Van Driel is a solid player that will likely also qualify, unless Huizing has some good results and pushes past him
Norway: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Viktor Hovland (112), Kristoffer Ventura (156)
Hovland has set the golfing world on fire recently, the PGA got some flack that he didn’t automatically qualify for the Tour this year because he didn’t play enough events despite being stellar in most of them, including a T12 at the US Open as an amatuer. Nonetheless, his T2 last week in Boise in the KFT Finals clinched his Tour card next year. But let’s not forget the other young Norwegian. Kristoffer Ventura was apart of that Oklahoma St. men's team that included Hovland and Matthew Wolff that won the NCAA title in 2018, and Ventura won twice on the Korn Ferry Tour to easily earn his Tour card next year as well. Both should be easy locks from the traditionally meh golfing country.
Portugal: BUBBLE BOYS: Ricardo Santos (229), Jose-Filipe Lima (280)
Lima was the last person in the field in 2016, but will need an improvement in OWGR standing or some withdrawals to make it in. Santos is just barely in the field as of now, but like most bubble boys could use some high finishes to keep his spot. Santos and Lima are the only Portuguese golfers in the Top 500 of the World Rankings, so there won’t likely be anyone usurping them here.
Slovakia: VIRTUAL LOCK: Rory Sabbatini (70).
The former South African married a Slovakian and adopted her nationality to have a better shot at making the Olympic team. The 43 year old played excellently this year to all but clinch his spot in Tokyo. No other Slovakians have OWGR points to mention here.
Spain: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Jon Rahm (5). BUBBLE BOYS: Rafa Cabrera Bello (42), Sergio Garcia (45). OUTSIDE SHOT: Jorge Campillo (75).
Pretty self explanatory, almost like the Italy scenario above. Rahm already has a bunch of points locked up already, he’s all but guaranteed to make the field, leaving Rafa and Sergio to battle it out. Campillo already has one win this year, if Rafa and Sergio don’t play up to expectations Campillo could snatch the second Spanish slot
Sweden: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Henrik Stenson (31). INSIDE TRACK: Alex Noren (47). OUTSIDE SHOT: Alexander Bjork (118), Marcus Kinhult (127).
The Rio silver medalist is well on his way to return to improve that medal to gold. Noren isn’t too far behind in the OWGR standings, but he’s been among the worst Top 100 players in the world this year and if he continues to be this bad, don’t be surprised if either Bjork or Kinhult get some good results to edge him out.
Africa:
South Africa: INSIDE TRACK: Louis Oosthuizen (22). BUBBLE BOYS: Justin Harding (52), Erik van Rooyen (62), Branden Grace (77), Dylan Frittelli (94).
Oosty has separated himself from the other Africans and will very, very likely claim the first South African slot if he wishes. The other spot is a free for all, Harding and van Rooyen have had great seasons on the European Tour, each with a win and an additional second place finish. Harding has been looking to jump to the PGA Tour, where he is currently in line for a card. Frittelli has had a bit of a down year but did win the John Deere and looks to be trending up for the 2020 PGA season. Lastly, Branden Grace has fallen off from his Top 10 place a couple of years ago but a return to that caliber could also send him to the Olympics. South African is one of the most competitive countries for Olympic qualifying
Zimbabwe: INSIDE TRACK: Scott Vincent (173)
The only other African country with someone good enough to qualify, Scott Vincent has played fairly well in Asia to carve out a pretty solid spot in the Olympic field. Not really a whole lot to say.
Asia
China: VIRTUAL LOCK: Haotong Li (50). INSIDE TRACK: Zhang Xinjun (138). OUTSIDE SHOT: Wu Ashun (285)
Li has been the best player in China for a while and likely will be the best Chinese player for a long time. The only real competition is Xinjun, who finished second on the Korn Ferry Tour season. While I am tempted to put Xinjun in the “lock” category, he struggled in the 2017 when he had his full PGA Tour card and if he replicates that, he could be caught by Ashun if he isn’t careful. Wu also hasn’t been playing all that well, but if he returns to the World Top 200 form he’s shown for most of the decade, it might be enough to wiggle his way into the Olympics.
Chinese Taipei (Taiwan): VIRTUAL LOCK: CT Pan (51)
The former World No.1 Amateur won for the first time on the PGA Tour this season to jump into the Top 50 in the world and will likely represent the island nation in the Olympics once again
India: BUBBLE BOYS: Gaganjeet Bhullar (217), Shubhankar Sharma (241). OUTSIDE SHOT: Anirban Lahiri (278).
A year ago it seemed like India was a lock for two spots in the Olympic field, but now not so much. Since his two European Tour wins last year, Shubhankar Sharma has been downright awful. He’s not in the Top 110 for the Race to Dubai, and right now he’s trying to get his PGA Tour card in the KFT Finals, but has missed the cut badle in both attempts. The other supposed lock, Anirban Lahiri, finished outside the Top 150 on the PGA Tour, but luckily for him he has played well and should get his card back. Gaganjeet Bhullar, who looked like the odd man out, is now the best player in India, though he himself hasn’t had a Top 20 since the Kenya Open back in March. Bhullar and Sharma are technically still in the virtual field but need to play a lot better if they want to get in, and Lahiri needs to keep the abilities he’s flashed recently to get back into the Olympics.
Japan: VIRTUAL LOCK: Hideki Matsuyama (26). BUBBLE BOYS: Shugo Imahira (80), Rikuya Hoshino (109), Ryo Ishikawa (122). OUTSIDE SHOT: Satoshi Kodaira (132), Yuta Ikeda (141)
The host nation automatically gets one spot no matter what, but Japan won’t need that and will comfortably fit two into the field. Hideki has consistently been the best Japanese player for several years and it’s no different now. The second spot is a free for all. Ishikawa is first in money on the Japan Tour, Hoshino is first in points, and Hoshino is third in both points and money. All of them have been playing great all year in the land of the rising sun, I wouldn’t be surprised if any of them represent their country in the Olympics next year. I’ve put Kodaira and Ikeda in the “outside shot category” because while both of them are moderately close in OWGR, neither of them have been playing all that well as of late. Ikeda has been decent but not good enough to retain his Top 100 spot in the World Rankings, and Kodaira missed the FedEx Cup playoffs entirely this year stateside (his win at the Heritage last year helps him retain full PGA status, which will help). While these guys still have a half-decent shot at making the Olympic team, I’m not too confident in them playing well enough to get there. Anyone else is outside the Top 150 in the world and probably has too many good players to jump to make it into the top 2 for Japan. There’s just so many good golfers from here.
Korean Republic (South Korea): BUBBLE BOYS: Byeong Hun An (49), Sungjae Im (55), Si Woo Kim (66), Sung Kang (78). OUTSIDE SHOT: Sanghyun Park (128).
South Korea is another extremely competitive country, with basically four players competing for two spots. Sungjae Im lead the Web.com Tour in points last year and followed it up with an appearance in the Tour Championship this year, Im might be the best player of the four right now. Si Woo has been incredibly stable in recent years, consistently being 40-60th in the world, and has the best career win of the four with his Players Championship in 2017. An is another extremely solid player, with his best win coming at the BMW PGA in Europe in 2015. I would bet on those three equally, but I also wouldn’t count on Sung Kang. While he did win the Byron Nelson this year and posted a 7th place finish at Bethpage Black, he’s been in a rut lately and hasn’t finished better than 60th since. If he can find the magic he had in Dallas he could make a big push for one of the two spots. Lastly, Sanghyun Park is a veteran of the Japanese and Korean Tours who finished runner up on the Asian Order of Merit last year. His four Top 10’s this year in Japan and a T16 at the Open has helped him maintain his 125ish world ranking but he’ll likely need a couple wins to make a push for the Olympics.
Malaysia: BUBBLE BOY: Gavin Green (209).
Green has been around 175-225 in the world for the past couple of years, which might be seen as a disappointment for the young Malaysian, but it’s still good enough to be the best in the country and good enough to consistently have a place in the Olympic field. However, if can’t sustain this pace he could fall out, which is why he’s still on the bubble
Philippines: BUBBLE BOYS: Miguel Tabuena (296), Angelo Que (305)
These two Filipinos have bounced around between 200-300 all year, but recently they haven’t been able to place on the Asian Tours as well as they were, resulting in both of them slipping down the OWGR rankings. Tabuena did win the Queen’s Cup tournament on the Asian Tour late last year, which probably means he’s the best positioned of the two but they still both need to play better if the Philippines wants to be represented on the course in Tokyo.
Thailand: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Jazz Janewattananond (58), Kiradech Aphibarnrat (65).
Jazz has led the Japan Tour in money and points for most of the year and was in the second last group at Bethpage this year. Bart Rat has had a down year but still finished T3 at the WGC in Mexico and a T5 at the Byron Nelson. Both of them are still almost 200 spots ahead of the next Thai player and safely in the Olympic field.
Oceania
Australia: INSIDE TRACK: Adam Scott (15). BUBBLE BOY: Jason Day (23), Marc Leishman (24). OUTSIDE SHOT: Cameron Smith (46).
Scott, Day, and Leishman all have potential to be Top 10 players in the world, it’s just a matter of who will be playing the best right before the Olympics. Scott gets the ranking of “inside track” just because he’s several spots above the other two, which is a sizeable gap this high up in the rankings. Of everyone in the “inside track” category, he’d be the least surprising to miss. Cameron Smith is also very talented but we haven’t seen him put it all together on the PGA Tour. I think he’s a step below the other three for sure and the current day rankings reflect that, but I wouldn’t be shocked to see him win a big one and jump the others by next June.
New Zealand: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Ryan Fox (103), Danny Lee (133)
To finish off, a nice clear cut double lock. Fox and Lee are the only New Zealanders inside the Top 350 and should safely be in the field
Summary:
  • VIRTUAL LOCKS (28): Abraham Ancer, Brooks Koepka, Emiliano Grillo, Joaquin Niemann, Jhonattan Vegas, Bernd Wiesberger, Thomas Pieters, Lucas Bjerregaard, Thorbjorn Olesen, Mikko Korhonen, Martin Kaymer, Justin Rose, Rory McIlroy, Shane Lowry, Francesco Molinari, Joost Luiten, Victor Hovland, Kristoffer Ventura, Rory Sabbatini, Jon Rahm, Henrik Stenson, Haotong Li, CT Pan, Hideki Matsuyama, Jazz Janewattananond, Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Ryan Fox, Danny Lee
  • INSIDE TRACKS (12): Adam Hadwin, Corey Conners, Dustin Johnson, Juan Sebastian Munoz, Thomas Detry, Tommy Fleetwood, Darius van Driel, Alex Noren, Louis Oosthuizen, Scott Vincent, Zhang Xinjun, Adam Scott
  • BUBBLE BOYS (42): Carlos Ortiz, Justin Thomas, Patrick Cantlay, Tiger Woods, Xander Schauffele, Bryson Dechambeau, Nelson Ledesma, Fabrizio Zanotti, Sepp Straka, Matthias Schwab, Kalle Samooja, Kim Koivu, Benjamin Hebert, Mike Lorenzo-Vera, Romain Langasque, Maximilian Kieffer, Stephan Jaeger, Paul Casey, Andrea Pavan, Guido Migliozzi, Ricardo Santos, Jose-Filipe Lima, Rafa Cabrera-Bello, Sergio Garcia, Justin Harding, Erik van Rooyen, Branden Grace, Dylan Frittelli, Gaganjeet Bhullar, Shubhankar Sharma, Shugo Imahira, Rikuyo Hoshino, Ryo Ishikawa, Byeong Hun An, Sungjae Im, Si Woo Kim, Sung Kang, Gavin Green, Miguel Tabuena, Angelo Que, Jason Day, Marc Leishman
  • OUTSIDE TRACK (34): Mackenzie Hughes, Roger Sloan, Nick Taylor, Roberto Diaz, Jose de Jesus Rodriguez, Rafael Campos, Tony Finau, Webb Simpson, Patrick Reed, Gary Woodland, Rickie Fowler, Matt Kuchar, Adilson da Silva, Hugo Leon, Nicolas Echavarria, Marcelo Rozo, Nicolas Colsaerts, Tapio Pulkakken, Alexander Levy, Victor Perez, Antoine Rozner, Matthew Fitzpatrick, Matt Wallace, Ian Poulter, Daan Huizing, Jorge Campillo, Alexander Bjork, Marcus Kinhult, Wu Ashun, Anirban Lahiri, Satoshi Kodaira, Yuta Ikeda, Sanghyun Park, Cameron Smith
So it looks like I’ve given 40 slots for locks and inside tracks, meaning that the 42 bubble boys look to be fighting for 20 spots, and the outside track people maybe stealing a couple from them. While this may look like an exhaustive list, there is a very real possibility that someone not mentioned at all here steals an Olympic slot, 10 months is still a very long time in the golf world. Still, hopefully this serves as a handy guide for the future.
submitted by packmanwiscy to golf [link] [comments]

[OC] Who's in line to make the 2020 Olympic Field: Part 2

With the Christmas break in full swing (golf pun), most of the major world tours off and many of the top players relaxing in their offseason, it’s a great time to look at Olympic Qualifying. A lot has changed in the 4 months since I last posted. As a reminder, Olympic Qualifying ends on June 22nd and will take the Top 60 players in the Official World Golf Standings (OWGR), with each country getting a maximum of two slots, unless they have more than two players in the Top 15, which in case they can send a maximum of four players. These rules are fairly simple to follow if you aren’t following this wordy explanation, you’ll see how it works as I go along. I’ll be going continent-by-continent grading players on the likelihood that they’ll qualify. A “Virtual Lock” means they’re almost guaranteed to make the Olympics. Someone “On The Inside Track” means they will likely make the Olympics if they continue their form of play in the future. A “Bubble Boy” is someone on the edge of qualifying that needs to pick up the pace to ensure their spot or else they’ll need others to play even worse to qualify, and finally an “Outside Shot” has a small chance but needs either a watershed victory and/or declines from people above them to make the Olympic Field. These of course are not final, a lot can change in six months. People who are virtual locks may still fall out if their play drops off (as some have fallen in rank since September) and people who aren’t even on the radar can still sneak into the Olympic Field.
North America:
Canada: INSIDE TRACK: Adam Hadwin (currently 49th in the world), Corey Conners (60). OUTSIDE SHOT: Nick Taylor (234), Roger Sloan (249), Mackenzie Hughes (263),
Hadwin and Conners have kept up their play in the downs season, Hadwin has two Top 5 finishes and Conners in a four tournament Top 20 streak. Still, six months is a long time and the other three Canadiens on tour still can weasel their way into the field. Conners himself jumped 100 spots with his win at Pebble in February, one of these guys could jump in a similar manner and edge out the others. Still, Conners and Hadwin are definitely favorites
MEXICO: VIRTUAL LOCK: Abraham Ancer (37). INSIDE TRACK: Carlos Ortiz (144).
Being a Top 50 player from a weaker golf country like Mexico puts Ancer firmly in the Tokyo Field. Since his great performance in the playoffs last year, Abraham has continued his good form with a T4 at the HSBC and a T8 at Mayakoba. Carolis Ortiz also had a strong showing in his home country with a T2, and additional T4’s in Houston and in the Sanderson Farms has put him in the Top 150 in the world. This gives him a lot more of a safety net to work with. It’s not a sure bet, but Ortiz has done a lot in the past two months to guarantee Mexico has two representatives in Tokyo.
PUERTO RICO: OUTSIDE SHOT: Rafael Campos (521). Campos just got his Tour card by finishing in the Top 25 in the Korn Ferry Tour season, and hasn’t looked awful in his appearances on tour. He is very far down on the pecking order at the moment but I still think he has a chance of getting a couple good finishes and sneaking his way into Olympic consideration.
USA: VIRTUAL LOCK: Brooks Koepka (1). BUBBLE BOY: Justin Thomas (4), Dustin Johnson (5), Tiger Woods (6), Patrick Cantlay (7), Xander Schauffele (9), Webb Simpson (11), Patrick Reed (12) OUTSIDE SHOT: Bryson Dechambeau (14), Tony Finau (17), Gary Woodland (18),
Not a whole lot has changed, the US is still the strongest golf nation and so many great players could find themselves in the Top 4 and work their way into the Olympic Field. Koepka’s lead as the No.1 player in the world is so massive I have to think he only won’t be in the Olympic Field if he chooses not to go. DJ hasn’t played since the Tour Championship and recent wins by JT and Tiger has made me downgrade Johnson to a bubble boy. For the guys on the outside shot, I only listed guys currently in the Top 20 just because anyone further back would jump a lot of guys, but anyone in the top 40 or so could get hot and win 2-3 times and sneak in at the right time. The USA is just so stacked.
South America:
Argentina: INSIDE TRACK: Emiliano Grillo (104). BUBBLE BOY: Fabian Gomez (231), Nelson Ledesma (299)
Grillo may be falling out of the Top 100 for the first time in a while but he should be good for the Olympics. Still, the fact that he has only 1 Top 10 in a year has me concerned, which is why he goes from a Virtual Lock to being on the inside track. Fabian Gomez finished second in the KFT Finals and 7th in Bermuda to jump into Bubble Boy status. Ledesma hasn’t won OWGR points since July but his PGA Tour card will go a long way for Olympic qualifying. He’s still very much a bubble boy despite a slow start to the season
Brazil: OUTSIDE SHOT: Adilson da Silva (337).
Brazil’s 2016 Olympian picked up a solid T2 in Taiwan, but his ability to pick up OWGR is limited by playing primarily in Asia and Africa.
Chile: VIRTUAL LOCK: Joaquin Niemann (57). OUTSIDE SHOT: Huge Leon (378)
Niemann wasn’t in doubt to make the field in August, but his win at the Greenbrier vaulted into the Top 50.. Leon has two Top 10 finishes in the last couple of months but unfortunately that wasn’t enough to keep is European tour card (he was the literal bubble boy, finishing 116th when the top 115 keep European Tour membership), so he very much stands on the outside looking in.
Colombia: ON THE INSIDE TRACK: Juan Sebastian Munoz (105).
Munoz went from a Bubble Boy to pretty solidly in the field with his win at the Sanderson Farms, and his T3 at the RSM a couple of weeks ago certainly didn’t hurt him either. I might be tempted to say he’s a lock, but I’ll be on the cautious side. He can’t grow complacent or else he just might lose his spot.
Paraguay: BUBBLE BOY: Fabrizio Zanotti (283).
A bad spring and summer resulted in Zanotti falling more than 100 spots in the OWGR, but a couple decent results this fall have helped him recover some ground. The 2016 Olympian is still very much battling for a return.
Venezuela: INSIDE TRACK: Jhonattan Vegas (155).
Jhonny Vegas is still struggling to put together good weeks on tour. I’ve downgraded him since if he continues his fall, Venezuela might fall completely out of the Olympic field.
Europe:
Austria: VIRTUAL LOCK: Bernd Wiesberger (22). INSIDE TRACK: Matthias Schwab (80). OUTSIDE SHOT: Sepp Straka (209)
Wiesberger was outside the Top 350 in the world in Early May. Since then he’s won three times on the European Tour, two of which are Rolex Series wins, and four other Top 10 finishes has put him into the Top 25 in the world. Schwab has placed better than T8 six times in his last 9 tournaments to similarly jump into the Top 100. Both of them should be very solidly in the field, but Sepp Straka is a promising young player in the US that could very well make a jump this year. If Mattias can’t keep up his hot streak he could be in danger of a surging Sepp taking his Olympic spot.
Belgium: INSIDE TRACK: Thomas Pieters (84) Thomas Detry (118). OUTSIDE SHOT: Nicolas Colsaerts (181)
I said that Colsaerts could sneak his way into the field with a return to form, and he delivered with a win in France to move inside the Top 200. To be fair, Dentry has also stepped up his game with three Top 4 finishes in his last four tournaments. Still, Pieters and Dentry are still the favorites to come out of Belgium, but it’s much more in the air. I’ve moved Pieters down from “lock” to “inside track”
Denmark: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Lucas Bjerregaard (79), BUBBLE BOYS: Thorbjorn Olesen (92), Joachim B Hansen (147), Rasmus Hojgaard (196). OUTSIDE SHOT: Jeff Winther (323)
Thorbjorn Olesen is facing sexual assault charges and the European Tour has said that Olesen will be suspended indefinitely, at least until his trial is finished. This will last until May 2020, so Olesen will drop in the OWGR until then. How far he will sink and how many tournaments he will play after he is unsuspended is an open question. Meanwhile, Beer Garden is still a lock and Hansen looks to be the top candidate to take advantage of Olesen’s alleged misconduct, but Hojgaard’s win in Mauritius on the European Tour certainly vaults him into the conversation.
Finland: INSIDE TRACK: Mikko Korhonen (140), Kalle Samooja (178), OUTSIDE SHOT: Tapio Pulkakken (385)
Korhonen hasn’t placed a Top 10 since his win in China in early May, so I’ve downgraded him from a lock to the Inside Track. Samooja placed 2nd at the European Masters and several other decent finishes has made his position in the field a little more secure. Tapio is the only other Finn to keep his European Tour card, and he could wiggle his way to Tokyo if one of the others has a drop off.
France: BUBBLE BOYS: Victor Perez (45), Mike Lorenzo-Vera (70), Benjamin Hebert (97), Romain Langasque (111).
I said this was one of the juiciest races, and it hasn’t disappointed. Perez, who I initially said had an Outside Shot, won at the Dunhill Links, finished T4 at the WGC-HSBC, and T2 in Turkey to be the current favorite to represent the French in Tokyo. Lorenzo-Vera hasn’t missed a non-major cut since last January and has maintained a Top 100 spot. Hebert finished 2nd in Turkey and 4th in Mauritius to keep within the Top 100. Langasque hasn’t been as good as the other three, but he’s still capable of a win in Europe and get himself in the Top 2 Frenchmen. These 4 have separated themselves from their other countrymen, but it’s still a toss-up for who is going to be in. I don’t think any of them are safe, not even Perez
Germany: VIRTUAL LOCK: Martin Kaymer (126). BUBBLE BOYS: Sebastian Heissele (191), Maximillian Kieffer (281),
I know Kaymer is below some on the inside track but I just can’t see the former World No.1 missing, it feels almost blasphemous to say otherwise. Heissele has four Top 3 finishes on the Challenge Tour in the last three months to get his way into the current field, but sustaining that success will be hard to come by. Kieffer, the only other German on the European Tour, will be the best person in position to supplant Heissele.
Great Britain: VIRTUAL LOCK: Justin Rose (4). INSIDE TRACK: Tommy Fleetwood (10). BUBBLE BOYS: Paul Casey (16). OUTSIDE SHOT: Matthew Fitzpatrick (25), Danny Willett (29), Matt Wallace (30), Tyrrell Hatton (32).
Rose is a Top 4 player in the world and will easily be within the Top 15 in the world even if multiple Brits somehow jump him. Fleetwood and Casey will battle it out for second place, but as long as both of them finish in the Top 15 in the world, they could both make it. Fleetwood is the favorite of the two, so I put him in the Inside Track and Casey as a Bubble Boy. The other four need a solid win or two to try and bump themselves into the Top 15 in the world. This is almost a carbon copy of what I wrote last time, not a whole lot has changed
Ireland: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Rory McIlroy (2), Shane Lowry (19). The current FedEx Cup Champion and Open Champion are clear favorites to represent Ireland in the Olympics, other Irish and Northern Irish golfers will likely need at least three major tour victories to have a shot at surpassing their OWGR totals, which won’t happen. Again, another straight copy and pace from a couple of months ago.
Italy: VIRTUAL LOCK: Francesco Molinari (15). BUBBLE BOYS: Andrea Pavan (75), Guido Migliozzi (110), Francesco Laporta (122).
Molibot has been on track to be the Italian representative since his Open win last year. He’s had a bit of a down year but his accrued points will be more than enough. Both Pavan and Migliozzi have been pretty strong in the hope stretch of the Race to Dubai, but Laporta is the real story with two wins and two T3’s on the Challenge Tour to get his European Tour card. As we’ve seen with some other players, maintaining the same amount of OWGR points on the main tour is easier said than done, but Laporta has played himself into contention for a ticket to Tokyo
Netherlands: VIRTUAL LOCK: Joost Luiten (84). BUBBLE BOY: Darius van Driel (177), Will Besseling (250).
Luiten has been on the top of Dutch golf for years and this shouldn’t change for 2020. Van Driel is a solid player but has been inconsistent since his win on the Challenge Tour in August, allowing Besseling to get into Bubble Boy status. Besseling finished the back half of the Challenge Tour season with six Top 15’s and picked it right up on the European Tour with a T3 at Dunhill.
Norway: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Viktor Hovland (93). INSIDE TRACK: Kristoffer Ventura (165)
Perhaps I was a little optimistic to anoint Hovland and Ventura as sure bets for Tokyo, as both have kind of stalled in OWGR. Hovland is still a virtual lock as he’s in the Top 100 and all of his points will still count come June, but Ventura is a little more precarious, so I’ve downgraded him to the inside track.
Poland: BUBBLE BOY: Adrian Meronk (215)
One of 2 new countries listed here, Adrian Meronk became the first Polish golfer to win a European Tour Card. I dismissed the Pole from my initial rankings but he proved me wrong with a win in Portugal and four Top 10’s on the Challenge Tour to vault into Bubble Boy status. Maintaining his world ranking on a higher tour can be tough but Meronk looks decent enough. Really hope he gets in, Eastern Europe has few high profile golfers and a trip to the Olympics could be huge for them.
Portugal: BUBBLE BOYS: Ricardo Santos (261), Jose-Filipe Lima (316)
These two have been in the 225-325 range almost all year, the more consistent bubble boys. Not a whole lot to add here, just seems like a good finish at the right time will be the difference between making it and not making it. Santos and Lima are still the only Portuguese golfers in the Top 500 of the World Rankings, so there won’t likely be anyone usurping them here.
Slovakia: VIRTUAL LOCK: Rory Sabbatini (84).
The former South African married a Slovakian and adopted her nationality to have a better shot at making the Olympic team, and it’s worked to perfection. If he still represented South Africa he’d be in a dogfight, with the Slovakian flag flying by his name he should coast to Japan.
Spain: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Jon Rahm (3). BUBBLE BOYS: Rafa Cabrera Bello (39), Sergio Garcia (41). OUTSIDE SHOT: Jorge Campillo (90), Adri Arnaus (115).
Still pretty self explanatory. Rahm already has a bunch of points locked up already, he will play in Tokyo as long as he wants to. Sergio won at the KLM and finished T6 at Dubai, but Rafa has kept pace with a solo 2nd in the Open de Espana and a T6 at the BMW PGA. I can’t imagine both of these guys if Speith can fall 30 spots in six months than these guys can too I guess. Neither Arnaus nor Campillo have been particularly good, but Arnaus did finish T6 in Spain so he’s for sure the “hotter” of the two and if anyone is going to catch Serg and Rafa it’d probably be him.
Sweden: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Henrik Stenson (26). BUBBLE BOYS: Alex Noren (73), Marcus Kinhult (83). OUTSIDE SHOT: Sebastian Soderberg (135), Joakim Lagergren (173), Alexander Bjork (175).
The Rio silver medalist is almost assured of defending that medal and mounting an attempt to upgrade to gold. Meanwhile Noren, who was a Top 10 player three years ago, has been downright awful. He’s dropped from 19 to 73 this year and has opened the door for other Swedes to win a ride to Tokyo. Kinhult’s recent solo 2nd at the Nedbanks has allowed him to almost draw even with Noren, and others such as Soderberg, Lagergren, and Bjork have a real chance of getting a couple good results and weaseling their way into the field.
Africa:
South Africa: INSIDE TRACK: Louis Oosthuizen (20). BUBBLE BOYS: Erik van Rooyen (50), Shaun Norris (58), Justin Harding (72), Christiaan Bezuidenhout (87), Dylan Frittelli (102), Branden Grace (125).
Oosty has separated himself from the other South Africans, but after that it’s a mess. Rooyen’s win in Sweden and T2 in Turkey has helped him edge out the second spot as of now but others are hot on his tail. Norris has the hot hand as of late, being on the Japan Tour limits his OWGR ability but since October he has one win, three 2nd, and two other Top 10’s. I’m not sure if he can keep it up in 2020 but he’s at least banked a good amount of points and carried the momentum into the next year. Bezuidenhout has put himself in serious contention with a 3rd at the BMW PGA but other than that he’s been inconsistent. Harding failed to get a PGA Tour card but he’s put up a pair of T7’s in Europe, but that hasn’t been enough to hold onto the second RSA spot since the last time we looked at the Olympic standings. Frittelli also has a pair of Top 10’s since September, but his PGA Tour card helps him out compared to Harding. And Branded Grace is still a former Top 10 player in the world and absolutely has the potential to get hot. There’s so many South Africans that could easily snag that second spot.
Zimbabwe: INSIDE TRACK: Scott Vincent (130)
Scott Vincent doesn’t have a worldwide win outside of the Japan Development Tour, but several Top 10’s on the regular Japan Tour has helped him remain around a steady 150th in the World. Maintaining this should easily result in being the only Non-RSA African in the Olympic field
Asia
China: VIRTUAL LOCK: Haotong Li (68). INSIDE TRACK: Zhang Xinjun (131). OUTSIDE SHOT: Yuan Yechun (301)
Li is the best player from China and will be invited to Tokyo barring something wild. I was skeptical of Xinjun sustaining his Top 150 ranking into the PGA Tour but he’s proven me wrong with a T7 at the Safeway and a T4 in Houston. He’s still in the inside track I’m much more optimistic about his chances. The 21 year old Yuan Yechun was outside the Top 400 but good performances at the WGC-HSBC, China Tour Championship, and the Australian Open has propelled him at least into the conversation.
Chinese Taipei (Taiwan): VIRTUAL LOCK: CT Pan (69)
The former World No.1 Amateur won for the first time on the PGA Tour this season to jump into the Top 50 in the world and will likely represent the island nation in the Olympics once again. Nobody else is in the Top 400 in the world for the island nation. Not much has changed since September.
Hong Kong: OUTSIDE SHOT: Kwanchai Tannin (329)
If you go to the OWGR page for Hong Kong, you won’t see anyone within the Top 300. But the International Golf Committee standings, which posts a virtual Olympic Field every week, lists Kwanchai Tannin as a member from Hong Kong. On the OWGR website he’s listed as Thai, but I’m gonna side with the IGC and say he’s representing Hong Kong. Tannin hasn’t been too good recently but a couple Top 10’s on the Asian Tour at least put him in the conversation.
India: BUBBLE BOYS: Rashid Khan (210), Shubhankar Sharma (246), Shiv Kapur (292), Ajeetesh Sandhu (320), Gangajeet Bhullar (334). OUTSIDE SHOT: S Chikkarangappa (365), Anirban Lahiri (402).
I severely underestimated how much of a clusterfuck India would be for Olympic qualifying. Nobody has separated themselves from the pack and a bunch have played themselves into contention. Khan has five worldwide T10 since August, but some have been on the Indian Tour which dishes out very few OWGR points so he’s only climbed to around 200th in the world. Sharma and Bhullar are the only two with European Tour cards so they probably have the best potential to make the Olympic field but none have been particularly impressive as of late. Sharma does have two T7’s one in Italy and another in Turkey, but still way too inconsistent to really say anything. Kapur and Sandhu have been bouncing between developmental tours picking up points but like Khan picking up OWGR points are going to be hard. The last person to note is Lahiri, who is the lowest in OWGR but is the only one to have a PGA Tour card. He’s a former Top 50 player in the world and very much has the skill of getting back into the Olympics, he just has to show it.
Japan: VIRTUAL LOCK: Hideki Matsuyama (21), Shugo Imahira (31).
You could make an argument that Shugo Imahira has been the best player in the world since the end of the Tour Championship. After that date, Shugo has 10 Top 10’s on the Japan Tour, including two wins and three 2nds. Granted it’s in Japan, but that’s still the third best tour in the world and I’m not sure even Top US golfers could do that. There are many good golfers but the sheer dominance that Imahira has displayed I think puts two locks for the host country.
Korean Republic (South Korea): INSIDE TRACK: Sungjae Im (34), Byeong Hun An (42). OUTSIDE SHOT: Sung Kang (86), Junggon Hwang (96), Si Woo Kim (97), Joohyung Kim (158)
Im hasn’t missed a cut since the Open, won at the Genesis on the Korean Tour, and placed 2nd at Sanderson Farms and 3rd at the ZOZO. An finished 3rd at the Sanderson Farms and has had 2 other Top 10’s on the PGA Tour. Both placed inside the Top 15 at the WGC-HSBC. As a result, both of them are now the clear favorites to play in Tokyo. The others certainly have a shot if either fall off (including the 17 year old Hookyung, don’t @ me. He hasn’t missed a cut since February and won an Asian Tour event. I’m calling my shot).
Malaysia: BUBBLE BOY: Gavin Green (227).
Green has been around 175-225 in the world for the past couple of years, which might be seen as a disappointment for the young Malaysian but it’s still good enough to be the best in the country and good enough to consistently be in the Olympic field. However, if can’t sustain this pace he could fall out, which is why he’s still on the bubble. This is exactly the same stuff I wrote in August.
Philippines: BUBBLE BOYS: Miguel Tabuena (258). OUTSIDE SHOT: Angelo Que (340), Juvic Pagunsan (370)
Tabuena has been decent since August, his T2 at the Taiwan Masters has helped him maintain his Bubble Boy status. On the other hand, Que has fallen off in recent weeks which downgrades his status. Juvic placed 2nd at the Segasammy Cup in Japan in August but has picked up very few OWGR points since.
Thailand: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Jazz Janewattananond (40). INSIDE TRACK: Kiradech Aphibarnrat (106). OUTSIDE SHOT: Gunn Charoenkul (152)
Jazz didn’t make the President Cup team, and took out his frustration by winning twice on the Asian Tour on consecutive weeks to finish the year inside the World Top 50 (The President’s Cup was the same week as the Japan Tour Finals idk if he wanted to play in it anyway). Barn Rat has been less than stellar, falling outside the Top 100 for the first time in several years, but he has a Tour card in both the PGA and European Tours so I am pretty confident that he should be the second Thai player in the field, but if he can’t climb back this opens the door for Charoenkul, who has four Top 10’s on the Japan and Asian tours since October
Oceania
Australia: INSIDE TRACK: Adam Scott (13). BUBBLE BOY: Marc Leishman (28). Jason Day (37). OUTSIDE SHOT: Cameron Smith (53).
These standings are static from August. Scott is a clear favorite, Leishman and Day could easily make the field depending on who's playing better at the time,, and Babyface Cam needs to ball out or hope both fall out to supplant them.
New Zealand: VIRTUAL LOCKS: Danny Lee (91). INSIDE TRACK: Ryan Fox (146)
I said these guys were both locks in August. Danny helped me out with a 2nd at the CJ Cup and a T10 at the ZOZO but Ryan Fox hasn’t had a Top 10 since his win in Perth in February. You don’t necessarily need Top 10’s on the European Tour to get enough OWGR points to stay in the Olympic field but you’d like to see some better finishes from the long driving Fox. I can’t see another New Zealander taking his spot, so as long as Foxy stays within the Top 200 in the world he should be fine, but the rest of the world is always catching up
Here’s a recap of all the locks, inside tracks, bubble boys, and outside shots. There are 42 Inside tracks or better, meaning the 47 bubble boys are going to be competing for 18 spots, with the outside shots looking to grab any of the spots if they falter
  • VIRTUAL LOCK (21): Abraham Ancer, Brooks Koepka, Joaquin Niemann, Bernd Wiesberger, Lucas Bjerregaard, Martin Kayer, Justin Rose, Rory McIlroy, Shane Lowry, Francesco Molinari, Joost Luiten, Victor Hovland, Rory Sabbatini, Jon Rahm, Henrik Stenson, Haotong Li, CT Pan, Hideki Matsuyama, Shugo Imahira, Jazz Janewattananond, Danny Lee
  • INSIDE TRACK (21): Adam Hadwin, Corey Conners, Carlos Ortiz, Emiliano Grillo, Juan Sebastian Munoz, Jhonattan Vegas, Matthias Schwab, Thomas Pieters, Thomas Detry, Mikko Korhonen, Kalle Samooja, Tommy Fleetwood, Kristoffer Ventura, Louis Oosthuizen, Scott Vincent, Zhang Xinjun, Sungjae Im, Byeong Hun An, Kiradech Aphibarnrat, Adam Scott, Ryan Fox
  • BUBBLE BOY (47): Justin Thomas, Dustin Johnson, Tiger Woods, Patrick Cantlay, Xander Schauffele, Webb Simpson, Patrick Reed, Fabian Gomez, Nelson Ledesma, Fabrizio Zanotti, Thorbjorn Olesen, Joachin B Hansen, Rasmus Hojgaard, Victor Perez, Mike Lorenzo-Vera, Benjamin Hebert, Romain Langasque, Sebastian Hessele, Maximillian Kieffer, Paul Casey, Andrea Pavan, Guido Migliozzi, Francesco Laporta, Darius van Driel, Will Besseling, Adrian Meronk, Ricardo Santos, Jose-Filipe Lima, Rafa Cabrera Bello, Sergio Garcia, Alex Noren, Marcus Kinhult, Erik van Rooyen, Shaun Norris, Justin Harding, Christiaan Bezuidenhout, Dylan Frittelli, Branden Grace, Rashid Khan, Shubhankar Sharma, Shiv Kapur, Ajeetesh Sandhu, Gangajeet Bhullar, Gavin Green, Miguel Tabuena, Marc Leishman, Jason Day
  • OUTSIDE SHOT (32): Nick Taylor, Roger Sloan, Mackenzie Hughes, Rafael Campos, Bryson Dechambeau, Tony Finau, Gary Woodland, Adilson da Silva, Hugo Leon, Sepp Straka, Nicolas Colsaerts, Jeff Winther, Tapio Pulkakken, Matthew Fitzpatrick, Danny Willett, Matt Wallace, Tyrrell Hatton, Jorge Campilo, Adri Arnaus, Sebastian Soderberg, Joakim Lagergren, Alexander Bjork, Yuan Yechun, Kwanchai Tannin, S Chikkarangappa, Anirban Lahiri, Sung Kang, Junggon Hwang, Si Woo Kim, Joohyung Kim, Gunn Charoenkul, Cameron Smith
submitted by packmanwiscy to golf [link] [comments]

PGA Championship Tiered Rankings and Betting Guide

Hi guys, I've been pretty busy with work recently but back in time to post for the next major. I still haven't finished scraping and compiling course fit but since I have everything else ready, I decided to go ahead and post what I got right now.
It's a tiered rankings of the guys my model likes the most. I'll update it accordingly once course fit is done but that's unlikely to really make too much of an impact.
Oosthuizen and Kisner are major surprises rounding out the the top 18.
My favorite betting option is Cantlay at 42:1 and Brooks Koepka offers the worst odds vs his simulated results, which would yield a -6% ROI.
Hope you enjoy, I'll post an update once course fit is done compiling. It's proving more difficult than usual with weather, conflicting scouting reports and that this event isn't regularly played at this course. Should have an update soon I hope. Just want to emphasize though that it won't make a significant impact.
submitted by DFSx42 to dfsports [link] [comments]

PGA Championship Tiered Rankings and Betting Guide

Hi guys, I've been pretty busy with work recently but back in time to post for the next major. I still haven't finished scraping and compiling course fit but since I have everything else ready, I decided to go ahead and post what I got right now.
It's a tiered rankings of the guys my model likes the most. I'll update it accordingly once course fit is done but that's unlikely to really make too much of an impact.
Oosthuizen and Kisner are major surprises rounding out the the top 18.
My favorite betting option is Cantlay at 42:1 and Brooks Koepka offers the worst odds vs his simulated results, which would yield a -6% ROI.
Hope you enjoy, I'll post an update once course fit is done compiling. It's proving more difficult than usual with weather, conflicting scouting reports and that this event isn't regularly played at this course. Should have an update soon I hope. Just want to emphasize though that it won't make a significant impact.
submitted by DFSx42 to pga [link] [comments]

Charles Schwab Challenge Preview, Picks, and Sleepers (PGA)

Article

The Course
•Colonial Country Club
•Fort Worth, Texas
•Par 70
•7,209 yards
◦Designed by John Bredemus and Perry Maxwell in 1936
◦First held here in 1946, it’s the longest running non-major that’s held at the same course each year
◦Bermuda fairways
◦Bentgrass greens (unusual for a Southern course)
◦Greens are small and are guarded by bunkers and, especially on the back nine, some water
◦Tight, tree-lined course with plenty of doglegs
◦Holes 3, 4, and 5 are known as the “Horrible Horseshoe” — a sharp, long, dogleg left par 4, followed by a 240 yard par 3, and a lengthy par 4 that bends right alongside the Clear Fork Trinity River
◦Can get pretty windy here
◦Known as a shot-maker’s course with narrow holes that like to turn both left and right so some will choose to club down off of the tee (accuracy > distance)


Key Stats
•SG: tee-to-green
◦SG: around-the-green
•Par 3 scoring
•Par 4 scoring
•Bogey avoidance
•Scrambling
•Proximity
•Driving accuracy

The Field
The Charles Schwab Invitational (which has had five different sponsors since the start of the 2000’s) is one of only five tournaments given invitational status which means the field will consist of 120-132 golfers. Justin Rose will be back to defend his 2018 title here as well as 15 other golfers that currently sit inside of the top 30 of the FedEx Cup Standings.

Strategy
It’s a smaller field this week so I would imagine people lean towards Dogs and Sleepers (aka stars and scrubs) because a higher percentage of golfers will make the cut compared to a 156 man field. A contrarian play might be to pick a more balanced lineup consisting of players in the mid to low $8,000’s and upper $7,000’s. Last week Bethpage Black played extremely long which heavily favored the bombers but at Colonial Country Club it appears to be anyone’s ball game, which opens up the player pool to any golfer “type”.
Big stat correlations that I saw for this course that differ from other courses are SG: around-the-green, proximity, scrambling, driving accuracy, and par 3 scoring. I’m guessing that is because this is a narrow course that forces players to be accurate off of the tee, often times laying up, and accurate into these small greens. Also, golfers will be forced to chip more and come out of green-side bunkers so touch game around the green is important. The type of player I am looking for this week will check most of those boxes.

Big Dogs ($9,000 and up on DK)
•Solid (Cash)
◦Justin Rose ($11,400 DK – $12,200 FD) – with stars and scrubs being the most likely formula this week it will be almost a sure thing that the returning champ has a lot of ownership. But with the course history of Rahm and Spieth also being very good (and with Spieth coming off of his first top 10 since God knows when) I can see those two soaking up some ownership which would make Rose an intriguing GPP play as well. Either way, at this course, I am going to roster the best iron player in this range this year which is Justin Rose — 14th overall in SG: approaching-the-green.
◦Paul Casey ($9,300 DK – $10,900 FD) – the last time Casey was here he finished 10th in 2017 and he is also coming off of a solid performance at the PGA Championship (29th). He’s very accurate off of the tee (13th) and inside of the top 30 in each of the SG metrics, besides putting. Colonial Country Club is a tricky course where any type of golfer can succeed so an all-around skill set like what Casey has is the safest play.
◦Ian Poulter ($9,100 DK – $10,600 FD) – Poulter’s approach game has slightly declined this year but he is still 41st in SG: tee-to-green and 15th in GIR mostly due to his accuracy off of the tee and touch around the greens. He did miss the cut last week but with a top 5 here in one of his last two starts (2015) and good recent form I could imagine a lot of people stay on Poulter for at least another week.

•Risky (GPP)
◦Xander Schauffele ($10,000 DK – $11,300 FD) – from Rickie at $10,500 to the bottom of the Big Dog range I’m having a hard time telling where the ownership will fall. That’s why I am going with the guy that I trust most in the top of that range for GPP plays: Xander. He is coming off of a 16th place finish at the PGA Championship and is known for showing up in big tournaments so I’m hoping that people will think he is mentally taking this week off. His course history might help some people make the decision to fade him because he has only finished 48th and 85th in his two attempts here (2017 & 2018).
◦Tony Finau ($9,600 DK – $11,200 FD) – Tony has a solid track record in this event with finishes of 19th, 34th, and 29th in his only three times playing here; starting with 2015 and playing the following two years but skipping 2018. But he has finished 60th or worse in three out of his last four tournaments and with the long ball being somewhat taken out of play this week I see a lot of people fading him here. He’s still a sneaky good fit for this course so if Tony is going to be low owned for only a couple weeks out of the year… this might be one of them.
◦Bryson DeChambeau ($9,400 DK – $11,100 FD) – Bryson is coming off of back to back missed cuts at the Heritage and last week at the PGA Championship. He also leaves something to be desired with his finishes at Colonial CC with two missed cuts and a 42nd place all in the last three years. The four guys priced beneath him have a combined six top 10’s in this tournament since 2015; with three 5th place finishes and one win so I could imagine a lot of people will drop down there with their lineup construction this week.


Value ($7,400 – $8,900 on DK)
•Solid (Cash)
◦Scott Piercy ($8,600 DK – $9,800 FD) – Piercy had a good showing last week at Bethpage Black for a guy that averages only 289 yards per drive. He finished 41st, and had back to back top 5’s before that, which extended his made cut streak to five tournaments. He’s only missed the cut here once in the last four years with a top 10 in 2017 and has a well rounded game and great stats (12th or better in GIR, bogey avoidance, par 4 scoring, and par 3 scoring) so I really like Piercy again for this week.
◦Joel Dahmen ($8,200 DK – $9,600 FD) – Dahmen has only played at Colonial CC once in recent history but it was last year and he ended up finishing T20. He didn’t have a great weekend at the PGA Championship last week but still managed to make it his 7th straight made cut. He’s struggled at times this year but has recently turned the corner and he appears to be a pretty good fit for this course with no major holes in his game so he is someone that I am going to lean on in Cash lineups.
◦Brandt Snedeker ($7,900 DK – $10,100 FD) – from McDowell at $7,800 through Kokrak at $8,900 you could make a case for picking just about any of these guys. That will potentially spread the ownership out and with stars and scrubs this week that will cut it down even more so feel free to dabble anywhere in this range. But my favorite pound for pound pick amongst them is Snedeker. He has five straight top 50’s at this course, solid recent form, and one of the better fits in my stat model (that’s priced below the Big Dogs)… I’m expecting big things from Sneds this week.

•Risky (GPP)
◦Sungjae Im ($7,700 DK – $9,400 FD) – In Sungjae’s last four tournaments he has gone CUT, 31st, MDF, and CUT. With his overall body of work this season and great all-around game I see him bouncing back (he’s 1st in my stat model this week) so even if people stay with him because of his low price tag, I’m willing to bite the bullet this week.
◦Abraham Ancer ($7,600 DK – $9,300 FD) – I stayed on Ancer last week and it paid off even on a very long and tough course. He ended up finishing 16th and with his accuracy off the tee (22nd), paired with his ability to score on par 4’s (15th), and avoid bogeys (27th), I see him as being a safe pick on a course where the cut line has typically been around 3 over par.
◦Matt Jones ($7,400 DK – $8,800 FD) – Matt Jones is another guy who rates out very well in my stat model and he’s also made nine straight cuts. His course history hasn’t been great here, finishing better than 63rd only once in his last three tries, so I’m hoping that cuts into his ownership because he could be a very good value play at this price tag if people are going to slightly overlook him.


Sleepers ($7,300 and under on DK)
•Solid (Cash)
◦Jim Furyk ($7,300 DK – $9,000 FD) – Furyk has missed two consecutive cuts but before that his season seemed to be juiced up on Five Hour Energy. In six events since February he had made all six cuts with five inside the top 25 and his worst finish at 37th place. Jim has had success here (although not in recent years) but his game is all about accuracy and it seems to be sharp in 2019 so I think it’s time to hop back on the Furyk-express.
◦C.T. Pan ($7,300 DK – $9,000 FD) – Pan had a rough go of it last week at Bethpage but that wasn’t a huge surprise with his lack of length. Before that he had a 35th at the Byron Nelson and just before that he won at the Heritage which is a similar style shot-maker course. Pan even finished 20th last year so I see him being a popular pick at Colonial, but a good pick nonetheless.
◦Bud Cauley ($7,200 DK – $8,700 FD) – Cauley is two for two in cuts at this tournament in the last five years with a 21st in 2014 and a 41st in 2017. He hasn’t been a world beater lately but in his last three events he hasn’t finished worse than 43rd. Bud is also the best at gaining strokes around the green this season so with the tough angles and small greens, his ability to play from just off the short grass should really come in handy this week.

•Risky (GPP)
◦Jhonattan Vegas ($7,300 DK – $8,800 FD) – Vegas shot a very miserable +13 at the PGA Championship last week when he seemed to be a great value pick. He burned some people (myself included) and, like Finau, might be overlooked this week because they lose their edge on the competition when the event isn’t on a bomber’s course. But like I mentioned last week, his around the green numbers and scrambling have vastly improved since last year so if many want to abandon ship on a guy that’s still a good fit and is having a great season then I will gladly double down on Vegas.
◦Brian Stuard ($7,100 DK – $8,600 FD) – Stuard has been very solid lately making four out of his last five cuts while three of those were top 20 finishes including a 4th place at the Valero. He’s also made three straight cuts at Colonial CC with his last two both being 32nd or better. Brian’s big problem is distance off of the tee but this is a course that could help him in that department.
◦Kevin Streelman ($6,900 DK – $8,400 FD) – after his back to back 6th place finishes at the Valero and the Heritage Kevin finished 45th at the Wells Fargo but we haven’t seen him since then. He’s not the longest off of the tee or the best around the green so that might have him on the back burner this week with most people but with his streaky-ness and ability to top 20 he should be in consideration. Streelman is 39th in SG: tee-to-green so even in a down year he certainly has the potential to finish high.


Dark Horses
•Solid (Cash)
◦Vaughn Taylor ($6,700 DK – $8,200 FD) – Vaughn is coming off of back to back top 20’s in his last two events and his last two tries at the Colonial CC so for under $7,000 he feels like a very safe pick. His iron play is stellar and he’s one of the best putters on Tour so even if he’s not a great bet to win the tournament he still seems like a shoe-in for a made cut and possibly top 30 so at $6,700, why not?
◦Nate Lashley ($6,400 DK – $7,400 FD) – I’m back on Nate Lashley and this might be the perfect course to hop on that train. He isn’t long off of the tee but he’s been one of the best iron players and recovery players this season so not only is he a steal on DK, but he is also a good straight up bet. We haven’t seen him a whole lot lately but he was 45th at the Wells Fargo and 29th at the Byrnon Nelson so he has been fairly steady in so-so fields and I would expect the same here.

•Risky (GPP)
◦Adam Schenk ($6,500 DK – $7,500 FD) – Adam Schenk has missed the cut in his last event and missed the cut here last year so I expect him to be somewhat dismissed this week but he’s had six finishes of 33rd or better in his last nine starts so don’t count him out just yet. He’s a decent scorer and only loses strokes around the green so if he can chip well this week in a tournament where people count him out, Adam will be a great Dark Horse pick.
◦Ryan Armour ($6,100 DK – $7,400 FD) – Armour has had a tough road as of late but has two finishes of 12th or better in his last eight events and a 14th place finish here last year. He’s one of the shortest off of the tee on tour and doesn’t have an incredible putter but he’s solid everywhere else. This seems to be a course that could fit his eye so for $6,100 and a potential top 10, he is one to consider in your GPP lineups for sure.
submitted by NatureBoyRicFlair36 to dfsports [link] [comments]

PGA Championship Plays & Picks from CheatSheetPros!

PGA Championship Plays & Stats from CheatSheetPros!
There are a ton of solid golfers this week and I wish I had time to talk about all of them but unfortunately I had to pick a few and go with them for the article. Here are some of my favorite plays so far! We are going to look at the scorecard, our Top 10 custom model rankings spit out by Fantasy National, 5 of the hottest golfers over the last 10 tournaments and then our favorite players including our “punt of the month” pick at only $6,100!
<
https://www.cheatsheetpros.com/blog/pga-championship-stats-picks-from-cheatsheetpros >>
SCORECARD:
There are 3 Par 5’s on this course and they are the 4th, 7th and 13th holes. They are the biggest scoring opportunity as they have a 38.7% - 56.7% - 28.6% birdie rate (respectively). No other hole on the course has a birdie rate over 20% so focus on Par 5 scoring monsters! There are 3 holes that are between 15%-19.9% and all other holes are sub 14%. Those 3 are #1 Par 4 – 430 yards – 17.6% birdie rate, #2 Par 4 – 389 yards – 19.5% birdie rate, #14 Par 3 – 161 yards – 19.8% birdie rate.
CHEATSHEETPROS CUSTOM MODEL RANKINGS:
1 – Rory Mcilroy
2 – Gary Woodland
3 – Jason Kokrak
4 – Dustin Johnson
5 – Justin Thomas (withdrew)
6 – Jon Rahm
7 – Adam Scott
8 – Justin Rose
9 – Tony Finau
10 – Paul Casey
HOTTEST GOLFERS OVER THE LAST 10 TOURNAMENTS:
RORY – 99.9 per game average (81.5, 84.0, 125.5, 87, and 125.5)
MOLINARI – 91.3 per game average (100, 96.5, 68.5 and 117.5)
TIGER WOODS – 91.0 per game average
DUSTIN JOHNSON – 89.7 per game average
BROOKS KOEPKA – 84.5 per game average (127.5 & 114.5 last 2!)

*** HIGH END GOLFERS **\*
DUSTIN JOHNSON (11100) –
Recent Form: Other than his most recent 28th at RBC he has finished in the top 10 in 7 of his previous 8 starts.
DK FPPG Range: 72.5 – 143 DK points over his last 5 starts.
Stats on this course: He has played this course 8 times and his numbers are solid. In those 8 rounds he is 2nd in SG:TOT, 3rd in SG: OTT and 5th in DK points.
Thoughts & Other Notable Stats: The #1 golfer in the world right now with 7 top 10s this season. He ranked out as #4 in our custom model and ranks 24th in Par 3s, 6th in Par 4s and 14th in Par 5s.

RORY MCILROY (10900) –
Recent Form: 6 Top 6 finishes in a row before his most recent 21st and 8th place finishes.
DK FPPG Range: 81.5 points to 125.5 over his last 5 starts.
Stats on this course: Played this specific course 8 times and ranks 1st in SG: T2G, 1st in SG: BS, 1st in SG: OTT, 7th in SG: APP and 20th in DK points. Solid numbers here!
Thoughts & Other Notable Stats: Ranks #1 in our custom model, solid recent form, solid stats at this course and in his last 50 rounds he ranks 3rd in Par 3s, 2nd in Par 4s and 19th in Par 5s. Solid numbers!

FADE: TIGER WOODS – I am 100% fading Tiger Woods this week. I think this is a solid let down spot for him after the big win. You could purely fade him based on ownership as everyone is going to be on some Tiger, he is just a popular golfer. Even most wives who don’t know any golfers know who Tiger Woods is. He ranks 32nd in P3s, 3rd in P4s and 33rd in P5s. He has played this course only 4 times and ranked 56th in Approach, 29th in DK points and 33rd and up in most other categories. Not what I want to see from the highest priced golfer.

BROOKS KOEPKA (10400) – I love me some Koepka and this guy looks like an animal if you have ever seen him in person. I was at the PGA Championship last year at Bellerive and Spieth walked by who is a skinny bean pole of a man and then comes Brooks Koepka who looked like a mini Schwarzenegger with arms ripping out of his shirt. Anyways he is a big dude! Brooks is coming off a 4th at the AT&T and 2nd at The Masters and put up 114.5 and 127.5 DK points in those two. I will own several shares of him this week but it is notable that he has played here 4 times and ranked terribly. He was 56th in SG: Total, 52nd in SG:T2G, 60th in SG:OTT and 46th in Approach. However I think his current form and with limited data we can use him with confidence. I just wanted to put those stats out there.

*** GOLFERS BELOW THE 10K MARK: MID-UPPER TIER PLAYS **\*
RICKY FOWLER (9300) –
Recent Form: 9th at The Masters, 4th at Wells Fargo.
DK FPPG Range: Consistent 70-90 DK point range.
Stats on this course: Very impressive in his 8 starts here – He is 12th in DK points, 5th in SG: Total, 16th in T2G, 6th in SG: OTT, 2nd in ARG, 17th in Putting and his only eye sore is 59th in Approach.
Thoughts & Other Notable Stats: Custom model dropped him down to 27th due to his 49th ranking over his last 50 rounds in Par 5s. But we like him and he is priced perfectly for a balanced lineup!

JASON DAY – Almost made the cut as his 8 starts here he is 2nd in SG: Total, 3rd in DK points and 21st in Approach. However, we didn’t pick him as a main target with his 2 missed cuts in his last 5 starts finishing 87th at Valspar and 123rd and the Arnold Palmer.

PATRICK REED (8400) –
Recent Form: 63rd, 28th and 36th in his last 3 starts putting up 67, 67.5 and 69.5 points.
DK FPPG Range: 19.0-69.5 DK points.
Stats on this course: Only 4 starts here but in those 4 he has been very productive ranking 1st in SG: Total, 7th in T2G, 8th in Approach, 17th in Putting and 2nd in DK points.
Thoughts & Other Notable Stats:

EMILIANO GRILLO (7100) –
Recent Form: 33rd, 62nd and 26th in his last 3 putting up 75.5, 50 and 81 DK points.
DK FPPG Range: 21.0 – 81.0 DK points in his last 5.
Stats on this course: Looking through stats here he jumped out. Only 4 starts but in those 4 he is 4th in SG: Total, 15th in SG: OTT, 26th in Approach, 10th in Putting and 3rd in DK points.
Thoughts & Other Notable Stats: Solid stats here for the price tag of $7.1k on DK!

SCOTT PIERCY (6500) –
Recent Form: 2ND at AT&T for 134.5 DK points and 3rd at RBC for 94 DK points.
DK FPPG Range: 23.0 – 134.5 DK points over his last 5, hot as of late!
Stats on this course: 6 rounds here with so-so numbers. 38th in SG: Total, 26th in T2G, 21st in SG: OTT, 13th in Approach (impressive!) and 37th in DK points.
Thoughts & Other Notable Stats: Solid punt play but will be over 10% owned in GPPs.

*** ULTIMATE LONG SHOT PLAY **\*
ROB LABRITZ (6100) & also notable he is 3,000:1 odds to win if you got a buck you want to set on fire! He is a club pro and club pros hardly ever make the cut in events like this but he has played more rounds on this course than anyone in the field. He won the New York State Open on this course in 2008, 2011 and 2016 so he is very familiar with it. I wasn’t able to dig around and get his scores but if he even makes the cut at this price tag you could build a dream lineup. I give up a 90% chance of failure and missing the cut but if you are ever going to take a shot on a club pro making the cut this is the guy!

FREE PREMIUM SHEET THURSDAYS! (Free group here and you get some premium member benefits just by being in the group!) {Remember we post our Premium Cheatsheets for FREE on Thursdays in our Facebook group: http://www.Facebook.com/groups/HazeSheets/}
FREE FLICK GROUP CHAT -> https://flickchat.page.link/VnJBhbF75TtAjN1J8
< Join us on flick as it is a free app for your phone so we can chat about daily fantasy sports, season long sports and sport betting picks.>
Thank you for reading and good luck!
Haze
submitted by CheatSheetProscom to dfsports [link] [comments]

PGA Player's Championship Player Pool

Click here for an introduction of me and the PGA model
Here are my rankings and betting picks for the entire field here on Fantasy Six Pack.
Work > Blogging
Hey guys, been really busy with work and business trips lately. Two weeks ago ran everything minutes before lock and didn’t have enough time to get in my dummy lineups. Ended up only getting in 5 lineups of the 10 so 1 of them just got ran out 6x. I was fortunate it min cashed but if you end up doing a lineup train due to time management then you’re clearly not doing something right. Needless to say I didn’t have the time to blog much about it that week.
Last week it was a similar issue but much better. I had some business trips and a lengthy layover where I thought it would be a good time to to run my model. I got everything done in time but then the laptop ran out of battery again after only converting about half the dummies into real lineups. I just decided to just embrace this as an opportunity to stop leaning so heavily on the model. I knew more or less who the model liked and created some lineups by hand. It was a nice breath of fresh air. I also didn’t blog that week because when traveling for work, I’m basically working non stop and when I’m free I choose to head outside and explore as much as possible.
Poker & the Ego
I also played some live poker in a casino for the first time in years. The stakes were low and I only had enough cash on hand to play short stacked but man played awful. I folded 99 flop shove on a low board and then folded TT to a 3bet pre. Looking back, my play was horrendous. I still can’t understand how or why I did what I did. The amount at stake was trivial compared to what I used to play, less than what I put in a single dfs h2h so I can’t possibly have been financially at scared and yet I played like scared money and nit folded in spots where I clearly had the best hand.
I want to try telling myself that I was tired and jetlagged and not properly adjusting to the short stacks in play that night. But the fact remains that I played like garbage and that has shaken me thoroughly. I was fine not playing poker anymore, but for some odd reason I’m only fine not playing poker anymore so long as in my mind I’m still a great player. If I’m a horrible player then that gives me all this incentive to play again and get that mojo back. Which is paradoxically the opposite of how I should approach the game. If I no longer got it, then that’s all the more reason to remain retired. But my ego just won’t allow me to sit idly by typing away here thinking someone out there should be facing my 3bet right now. The mind is a very odd thing indeed. I’ve been on the verge of downloading the software and getting back into the game in earnest even though there’s a multitude of reasons why I got out – primarily that it’s not something I particularly enjoy anymore.
The Change in Approach
Given the tight deadlines I had in previous slates, I decided to start taking a more proactive approach with my model. While much of it must wait until the day before as I wait on the latest information, there’s still a lot of things that won’t change like historical information that I don’t need to wait until the last minute. I started this one earlier than ever and it was very refreshing to be able to casually peruse what I had, knowing there were several days available. Inevitably, there’s a lot of things that I wanted to change or add onto but didn’t have the time available and really spent a good amount of time back in the lab, researching and making relevant adjustments. I’ve also been capitalizing on using this early start to get a good overall grasp of the field. I did this creating a tiered ranking system of the players, which I’ve been publishing over at fantasy six pack.
The Player Pool
This slate there’s a lot of players my model really loved. Normally it latches onto a few guys and then builds around them with some scrubs, this wasn’t the case this time as it had a larger player pool than ever.
Dustin Johnson
Rory McIlroy
Lucas Glover
Corey Conners
Jon Rahm
Patrick Cantlay
Henrik Stenson
Hideki Matsuyama
Jason Kokrak
Luke List
Paul Casey
Cameron Champ
Matthew Fitzpatrick
Sergio Garcia
Aaron Wise
Bubba Watson
Joel Dahmen
Adam Scott
Bronson Burgoon
Kyle Stanley
Jordan Spieth
Tiger Woods
Jim Furyk
Alexander Bjork
Brooks Koepka
Jason Day
Tommy Fleetwood
Keith Mitchell
Kevin Kisner
Louis Oosthuizen
Cameron Smith
Francesco Molinari
Justin Rose
Richy Werenski
Charley Hoffman
Rickie Fowler
Brian Gay
Alex Noren
Eddie Pepperell
Matt Wallace
Max Homa
Adam Long
Scott Piercy
Ian Poulter
Keegan Bradley
Billy Horschel
Michael Thompson
Chesson Hadley
The Trim
This was harder than usual, frankly, very few of the lineups it spit out were ones that I didn’t naturally fall in love with. However, I’m playing just 10 so I had to make some tough cuts. I went in with a goal not so much to choose the best individual lineups but rather remove the lone wolves who only showed up a few times and then make sure I wasn’t exposed to anyone over 50%. The end result was this.
Rory McIlroy
Dustin Johnson
Corey Conners
Henrik Stenson
Lucas Glover
Hideki Matsuyama
Matthew Fitzpatrick
Jon Rahm
Luke List
Cameron Champ
Bubba Watson
Patrick Cantlay
Jason Kokrak
Paul Casey
Sergio Garcia
Tiger Woods
Kevin Kisner
Louis Oosthuizen
Cameron Smith
Adam Scott
Aaron Wise
Jim Furyk
Guys I Really Like More Than My Player Pool Indicates
I’m particularly high on Oosthuizen, Cantlay, Smith, Conners & Fitzpatrick.
Thoughts on Tiger
This is not an emotional argument. The stats of his are truly quite impressive. He's back for sure and easily a top 10 golfer for this tournament and arguably top 5.
Guys I Will Be Watching
I’ll be paying close attention to Campillo, Homa, Burgoon, Thompson, Jazz & Suri. These are all guys that my model really liked. I feel if pricing were a bit tougher (they always make it easy jamming in your favorites for majors) then I’d have a lot more of those guys. Fortunately, I’m not faced with wondering if I should be playing a Campillo/Homa stack but can just make a mental note to track their progress.

Good luck everyone
submitted by DFSx42 to golf [link] [comments]

My Top 15 Rankings For The Masters

Accidently posted this to golf instead of ProGolf. Makes more sense here.
https://progolfweekly.com/power-rankings-2019-masters-tournament/
As 2019 enters its fourth month, America is exploding with green, meaning it is time again to award the sports world’s most famous sartorial symbol of athletic superiority: the green jacket.
Augusta National Golf Club, the picturesque host of the most acclaimed and exclusive golf tournament on the planet holds its 83rd addition this week, and this year promises to be one of the most thrilling yet. The field of 87 is composed of world-class talent, budding stars, and a venerable collection of ancient green jacket recipients who had their biggest moment announced by Vin Scully and Pat Summerall, and did their post-victory interviews on the Johnny Carson Show.
Ranking such a prodigious field of participants is a near-impossible task, but here goes nothing:
(Note: this will be the only mention of Zion Williamson)
15. Patrick Cantlay I wish there was a way to quantify this, but like few players in the field, Cantlay just “feels like” a Masters Champion. The 27-year-old is mature, refined, and resilient, and with his elite length and phenomenal iron game, what he possesses fits Augusta perfectly. The World No. 21 has not yet added a second career victory during the 2019 season, but he has stayed sharp, posting four top 10s in nine starts, and finishing outside the top 24 on just two occasions. Cantlay has the Tour’s seventh ranked scoring average, is 10th in strokes gained: tee-to-green, and since last season, has improved his strokes gained: putting standing from 153rd to 81st.
The former amateur superstar is ready for major championship contention, and do not be surprised to see him high on Sunday’s Masters leaderboard, despite the fact that he is making just his third career event start.
14. Bryson DeChambeau Brooks Koepka might have been the 2018 PGA Tour Player of the Year, and there was very little debate, but 2018’s breakout star was undeniably Bryson DeChambeau. The unorthodox 25-year-old took The Memorial, one of the year’s best fields outside of the majors and WGCs, in June, and then triumphed at three events in a five-start stretch later in the year, with two of those coming at FedExCup Playoff Events (he took third in the final Cup standings). Then for good measure, DeChambeau took the European Tour’s prestigious Omega Dubai Desert Classic in late January. In events that did not take place in Paris, DeChambeau emerged as of the Tours premiere players over the second half of 2018.
The next step for DeChambeau is to contend on the major championship stage. He has yet to post a top 10 in ten major starts, but that is really just a matter of time. He has played The Masters just twice, with his best finish being an impressive T21 as an amateur. While that limited experience at Augusta might make it improbable that he will leave Georgia on Sunday with a green jacket, nothing “The Mad Scientist” does at this point would be a surprise.
13. Justin Thomas It seems odd that a man who has five top 10s in 10 season starts, and leads the PGA Tour in birdie average and scoring average, could be having an underwhelming season, but that has been somehow true for World No. 5 Justin Thomas. The stats look fantastic, but after eight victories between 2017 and 2018, he has yet to land in the winner’s circle this year, and has surprisingly struggled to close several events where he was in contention. He is also in the midst of a three-start stretch where he has failed to place better than T24.
The 25-year-old is undeniably one of the best 3-5 players in the world, although he has yet to crack the code at Augusta, although he has improved in each of his three starts (T39, T22, T17). Nobody would be shocked if JT has a new green jacket and a second career major championship victory on Sunday, but he will need to quickly work out the kinks with his irons and putter that have circumscribed his results over the past month.
12. Phil Mickelson The 48-year-old three-time Masters Champion would become the oldest winner in tournament history if he is able to capture this year’s edition, a win which would also tie him with Arnold Palmer and Tiger Woods for the second-most green jackets. Despite his advanced age, Mickelson has been very sharp at time over the past two seasons, notching two victories in that span, after having not won an event in five years. The latter of those two victories was a phenomenal three-stroke win at February’s AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am, something that should be especially encouraging to the man who is a U.S. Open short of the career grand slam, since this year’s U.S. Open is being held at Pebble.
However, since that Pebble Beach romp, Mickelson has struggled. He has two missed cuts in five starts since, with nothing better than a T37. He is still long, but his putter has been giving him trouble.
Still, Mickelson always seems to awaken for the majors, and The Masters has been his best, placing in the top 10 on 15 occasions. What will be especially interesting will be if Mickelson lets Jake Owen try on his green jacket if he wins.
11. Jon Rahm The 24-year-old from Spain seems like a lock to someday win a major, and more likely will win many. Could this year’s Masters be major No. 1? Perhaps; Rahm finished solo-fourth at Augusta last year, in what was just his second start, but while he has already made a career of being impressively precocious, the man who has won twice on the PGA Tour and three times in Europe has yet to really contend down the stretch in the biggest of big-scale PGA Tour events. That first nearly happened at THE PLAYERS Championship last month, where he held the 54-hole lead, but he then imploded on Sunday with a 4-over 76 that knocked him out of the top 10 entirely.
Overall, Rahm has continued to shine in 2019, however. He has six top 10s in just 10 starts this season, and as always, he is killing it with his driver, where he ranks second on Tour in strokes gained: off-the-tee. At third on Tour in first round scoring average, do not be surprised if Rahm gets off to a fast start at Augusta.
10. Matt Kuchar Rickie Fowler has received the most scrutiny of anyone on Tour for not having yet won a major championship, but someone who should be feeling more pressure than Fowler is Matt Kuchar, who is 9.5 years older, and has also never landed in the winner’s circle of a major championship. His performances on the major stage have improved, as he has played inside the top 10 in four of them over the past two years, but he is another player who needs to take one of these to validate his career.
Fortunately for Kuchar, he is in the midst of a career renaissance. The current leader in the FedExCup standings had gone five years without a victory on Tour, but has two this season; one in Mexico and one in Hawaii. He has also played well outside those two victories, and especially as of late. Two weeks ago he made it to the championship match at the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, and then chased that runner-up with a T7 at last week’s Valero Texas Open. Kuchar has been fantastically accurate in 2019, leading the Tour in greens in regulation and ranking 6th in driving accuracy.
Kuchar will still have to jump some mental hurdles if he gets into contention late, but now that he knows how to win again, he seems like a much better bet to do that than he did a year ago. At the very least, he would like to get through this week without creating yet more controversy.
9. Jordan Spieth Well, there is no sugarcoating it: Masters prodigy Jordan Spieth has been really, really bad this season. His best finish in a stroke play event was 30th and he ranks 170th in the current FedExCup Standings. His putting has actually been passable, which is a big improvement from a lot of last year, but his driving has been a wreck; he is 212th on Tour in driving accuracy, a big part of the reason that he ranks 203rd on Tour in strokes gained: off-the-tee. Spieth is still carding a lot of birdies, but he is also posting a LOT of really bad numbers, which is illustrated by his 179th ranking in bogey avoidance. He has been especially bad on the weekends. His rounds have been madly inconsistent, and it might be unreasonable to expect him to suddenly put four rounds together at the biggest tournament of the year.
So… why is Spieth still ranked this high? Simply put, Jordan Spieth loves The Masters, and The Masters loves him. A course that has a reputation of needing considerable experience to conquer, in just five starts, Spieth has a win, two runner-ups, a solo-third, and a T11. He knows how to play this course, and while his recent results have been abysmal, there have been improvements and highlights as well. At last week’s Valero Texas Open, he surged into contention by opening with back-to-back rounds of 68, and while a front-nine implosion on Saturday basically torpedoed his chances, he showed tremendous resiliency by carding birdies on five of his last seven holes to turn a late 6-over into a 1-over. Also, in his last four starts, he bounced back from all three 75 or 76 rounds with an immediate sub-60 round. Spieth also has been strong this year at getting his tournaments off to good starts, which is essential at The Masters, as the last 13 champions have all been inside the top 8 after the first round.
Spieth will have to overcome some mental hurdles, but this is still HIS event, and we think he shows up strong for the sixth straight year.
8. Rickie Fowler An extremely common selection as the world’s best player without a major victory, it is very possible that nobody in this field needs this win for his legacy more than the extraordinarily popular Fowler. His 20s came and went in December without a major on his resume, despite man close calls: he has finished in the top five of eight career majors without a victory, two in each of the four majors. Fowler has finished in the top 12 in four of the past five editions of The Masters, with his best finish coming a year ago, when he shot a field low 12-under over the weekend to finish in solo-second place, one shot short of Patrick Reed.
If the World No. 9 is going to prevail in the first major start of his 30s, he will need to play better than he has over the past month, as his last three starts have resulted in finishes of T40, T47, and T17 respectively. Over the scope of the 2019 season, however, Rickie has played well, posting three finishes inside the top 4, including a victory at February’s Waste Management Phoenix Open. The strongest part of Fowler’s game has been his putting; he currently ranks 8th on Tour in strokes gained on the greens.
7. Brooks Koepka The reigning PGA Tour Player of the Year has been thoroughly unimpressive in 2019, and downright awful in the past month, but it’s a major this week, and Koepka knows how to do majors, something strikingly evident by the fact that he has won three of his past six major starts, including last year’s U.S. Open and PGA Championship. The World No. 4 has eight career top 10s in just 20 career major starts, but while none of those have come at The Masters, he has improved his standing in all three of his Augusta starts, finishing T33, T21, T11 respectively. Had he not been forced to miss last year’s Masters with an untimely injury, he very well could have shown four consecutive years of Masters improvement.
Koepka’s confidence seems to have been hurt some by a mild drop in distance, something he imputes to deliberate weight loss when trying to look more cut for last year’s ESPN “The Body Issue”, although his biggest drop-off statistically has been with his putter.
His current season has not been ALL bad; he won the CJ Cup @ Nine Bridges back in October, and took co runner-up position at early March’s Honda Classic, but he is currently mired in a three-start slump where he has a missed cut and two finishes of T56. There may be some reason for concern, but still… it’s a major, and it’s Brooks Koepka.
6. Xander Schauffele Xander Schauffele is a big-game hunter: when the stakes are highest, he is at his best. The 25-year-old has already placed inside the top 6 three times in eight career major starts, and made the final Sunday pairing of last year’s Open Championship. Schauffele also took the Tour Championship as a rookie, the highlight of a career that has shown that no moment is too big for him. He has been at his best in 2019, his third full time season on Tour, as he has already posted two wins; the first coming at a WGC event and the second coming at the stacked-field Sentry Tournament of Champions.
Schauffele’s unflappable demeanor and phenomenal tee-to-green game make him among the favorites to be the next first time green jacket winner. Experience might be his only limiting factor here.
5. Dustin Johnson DJ got the “best to never win a major” monkey off his back when he survived the controversial 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont, but the 34-year-old Coastal Carolina product is again facing pressure on the major stage, as having just one career major victory feels well short of a what a man of his caliber, a man who has 20 career PGA Tour victories, should have accomplished. Fair or not, he is still likely to play Augusta with a sense of urgency. He has yet to win a green jacket, but he has finished in the top 10 of his last three attempts, including a T10 at last year’s event.
2019 as been yet another tremendous season for the ultra-talented bomber: he won the WGC-Mexico Championship in February, three weeks before prevailing at a European Tour event in Saudi Arabia, and he has finished in the top ten of five of his past seven PGA Tour starts. A year after it seemed like he led the PGA Tour in everything, Johnson has again been a statistical monster, ranking second on Tour in scoring average and strokes gained: total.
4. Justin Rose The 38-year-old Brit comes into the week as the World’s No. 1 ranked player, holding that honor by a smidge over Dustin Johnson (he actually overtook DJ for No. 1 last week, even though neither Rose nor Johnson played). And like Johnson, it could be argued that Rose has been way too good in his career, a career that features 12 European Tour wins and 10 PGA Tour victories, to only have only taken one major championship (2013 U.S. Open).
The man who has been a sometimes-unstoppable top-10 machine over the past year and a half has played Augusta extremely well in recent years, having finished in the top 14 in seven of the past eight editions. Two of those high finishes were runner-ups, including a playoff loss to Sergio Garcia just two years ago. Rose has yet to conquer this event, but he certainly appears to have the game for the course.
Rose should be reasonably well-rested as he has made just six starts in the 2019 season, with four of those resulting in top 10s including a victory at January’s Farmers Insurance Open. In his most recent start, Rose finished T9 two weeks ago at the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, advancing from the group stage before being upset by Kevin Na in the round of 16. He currently ranks 3rd on Tour in birdie average and 10th in scoring average.
3. Francesco Molinari The 36-year-old from Italy has had very little success at Augusta, but his course history is possibly irrelevant as he has been arguably the world’s best golfer over the past 11 months. Among the highlights over that time include an unbelievable bogey-free weekend at last July’s Open Championship, where he captured his first major championship victory, an historically great 5-0 week for the winning European Ryder Cup team, and a final-round 64 that led to a two-shot victory at last month’s Arnold Palmer Invitational. Molinari has shown an ability to get hot and stay hot, and the last time we saw him, he was definitely “hot” as he was absolutely dominating his competition at the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play before getting nipped by Match Play savant Kevin Kisner in the semi-final round. He went on to win the third-place match.
A very encouraging development in Molinari’s 2019 game has been his putting. Historically the worst part of his game by far, he has jumped from 182nd on Tour in strokes gained: putting to 23rd in the past year, especially scary when combined with his tee-to-green game that ranked second on Tour to Dustin Johnson last season.
2. Tiger Woods The four-time green jacket winner has been extremely motivated to snap his notorious decade-long majorless streak, as he has contended at the last two: a T6 at The Open Championship and a runner-up to major championship wizard Brooks Koepka at the PGA Championship. After a very strong finish to last season, which included a milestone victory at the Tour Championship, Tiger has been “just ok” in 2019 (apologies to all of you who are sick of that phrase after several billion AT&T commercials during March Madness featuring a basketball announcer who was anything but “just ok”, but whatever), but his last start was very encouraging. At the WGC Dell Technologies Match Play two weeks ago, he advanced out of group play and then took down a red-hot Rory McIlroy in the round of 16. He very nearly cracked the top four, but lost his elite 8 match when he missed a four-foot putt on the final hole that he normally sinks in his sleep. The 43-year-old version of Tiger might not be the version that won the 1997 Masters in a 12-stroke romp, but he is still one of the biggest threats in the field. Expect Tiger to post his 14th career Masters top 10 in this, his 22nd career Masters start.
1. Rory McIlroy Everyone knows the story on Rory by now: the four-time major winner needs just a green jacket to become the sixth player in PGA Tour history to complete the career grand slam. In fact, this will be Rory’s fifth consecutive Masters start where he has a shot at that arduous feat.
McIlroy is undeniably well-positioned to become a Masters champion: five of his 18 career top-10s in majors have come at Augusta, including each of his past five starts here. In addition, his recent form has been phenomenal, as he has placed inside the top 10 in all seven of his PGA Tour starts since the calendar flipped to 2019. The acme of that stretch was a decisive victory at THE PLAYERS Championship, an event often referred to as “the fifth major”.
His victory at THE PLAYERS was especially notable because, despite all his recent high finishes, he had shown considerable difficulty closing tournaments with the lead, something that was well on-display at Augusta last year, where he made the final Sunday pairing, but proceeded to post an extremely uninspiring 74 that dropped him into a share of fifth place. His performance at TPC Sawgrass may have flipped the script on that narrative. The World No. 3 should love his chances this week, seeing as he leads the Tour in strokes gained: tee-to-green and strokes gained: total.
Next Five: Louis Oosthuizen, Tommy Fleetwood, Marc Leishman, Paul Casey, Jason Day
submitted by Raticus9 to ProGolf [link] [comments]

PGA Player's Championship Player Pool

Click here for an introduction of me and the PGA model
Here are my rankings and betting picks for the entire field here on Fantasy Six Pack.
Work > Blogging
Hey guys, been really busy with work and business trips lately. Two weeks ago ran everything minutes before lock and didn’t have enough time to get in my dummy lineups. Ended up only getting in 5 lineups of the 10 so 1 of them just got ran out 6x. I was fortunate it min cashed but if you end up doing a lineup train due to time management then you’re clearly not doing something right. Needless to say I didn’t have the time to blog much about it that week.
Last week it was a similar issue but much better. I had some business trips and a lengthy layover where I thought it would be a good time to to run my model. I got everything done in time but then the laptop ran out of battery again after only converting about half the dummies into real lineups. I just decided to just embrace this as an opportunity to stop leaning so heavily on the model. I knew more or less who the model liked and created some lineups by hand. It was a nice breath of fresh air. I also didn’t blog that week because when traveling for work, I’m basically working non stop and when I’m free I choose to head outside and explore as much as possible.
Poker & the Ego
I also played some live poker in a casino for the first time in years. The stakes were low and I only had enough cash on hand to play short stacked but man played awful. I folded 99 flop shove on a low board and then folded TT to a 3bet pre. Looking back, my play was horrendous. I still can’t understand how or why I did what I did. The amount at stake was trivial compared to what I used to play, less than what I put in a single dfs h2h so I can’t possibly have been financially at scared and yet I played like scared money and nit folded in spots where I clearly had the best hand.
I want to try telling myself that I was tired and jetlagged and not properly adjusting to the short stacks in play that night. But the fact remains that I played like garbage and that has shaken me thoroughly. I was fine not playing poker anymore, but for some odd reason I’m only fine not playing poker anymore so long as in my mind I’m still a great player. If I’m a horrible player then that gives me all this incentive to play again and get that mojo back. Which is paradoxically the opposite of how I should approach the game. If I no longer got it, then that’s all the more reason to remain retired. But my ego just won’t allow me to sit idly by typing away here thinking someone out there should be facing my 3bet right now. The mind is a very odd thing indeed. I’ve been on the verge of downloading the software and getting back into the game in earnest even though there’s a multitude of reasons why I got out – primarily that it’s not something I particularly enjoy anymore.
The Change in Approach
Given the tight deadlines I had in previous slates, I decided to start taking a more proactive approach with my model. While much of it must wait until the day before as I wait on the latest information, there’s still a lot of things that won’t change like historical information that I don’t need to wait until the last minute. I started this one earlier than ever and it was very refreshing to be able to casually peruse what I had, knowing there were several days available. Inevitably, there’s a lot of things that I wanted to change or add onto but didn’t have the time available and really spent a good amount of time back in the lab, researching and making relevant adjustments. I’ve also been capitalizing on using this early start to get a good overall grasp of the field. I did this creating a tiered ranking system of the players, which I’ve been publishing over at fantasy six pack.
The Player Pool
This slate there’s a lot of players my model really loved. Normally it latches onto a few guys and then builds around them with some scrubs, this wasn’t the case this time as it had a larger player pool than ever.
Dustin Johnson
Rory McIlroy
Lucas Glover
Corey Conners
Jon Rahm
Patrick Cantlay
Henrik Stenson
Hideki Matsuyama
Jason Kokrak
Luke List
Paul Casey
Cameron Champ
Matthew Fitzpatrick
Sergio Garcia
Aaron Wise
Bubba Watson
Joel Dahmen
Adam Scott
Bronson Burgoon
Kyle Stanley
Jordan Spieth
Tiger Woods
Jim Furyk
Alexander Bjork
Brooks Koepka
Jason Day
Tommy Fleetwood
Keith Mitchell
Kevin Kisner
Louis Oosthuizen
Cameron Smith
Francesco Molinari
Justin Rose
Richy Werenski
Charley Hoffman
Rickie Fowler
Brian Gay
Alex Noren
Eddie Pepperell
Matt Wallace
Max Homa
Adam Long
Scott Piercy
Ian Poulter
Keegan Bradley
Billy Horschel
Michael Thompson
Chesson Hadley
The Trim
This was harder than usual, frankly, very few of the lineups it spit out were ones that I didn’t naturally fall in love with. However, I’m playing just 10 so I had to make some tough cuts. I went in with a goal not so much to choose the best individual lineups but rather remove the lone wolves who only showed up a few times and then make sure I wasn’t exposed to anyone over 50%. The end result was this.
Rory McIlroy
Dustin Johnson
Corey Conners
Henrik Stenson
Lucas Glover
Hideki Matsuyama
Matthew Fitzpatrick
Jon Rahm
Luke List
Cameron Champ
Bubba Watson
Patrick Cantlay
Jason Kokrak
Paul Casey
Sergio Garcia
Tiger Woods
Kevin Kisner
Louis Oosthuizen
Cameron Smith
Adam Scott
Aaron Wise
Jim Furyk
Guys I Really Like More Than My Player Pool Indicates
I’m particularly high on Oosthuizen, Cantlay, Smith, Conners & Fitzpatrick.
Thoughts on Tiger
This is not an emotional argument. The stats of his are truly quite impressive. He's back for sure and easily a top 10 golfer for this tournament and arguably top 5.
Guys I Will Be Watching
I’ll be paying close attention to Campillo, Homa, Burgoon, Thompson, Jazz & Suri. These are all guys that my model really liked. I feel if pricing were a bit tougher (they always make it easy jamming in your favorites for majors) then I’d have a lot more of those guys. Fortunately, I’m not faced with wondering if I should be playing a Campillo/Homa stack but can just make a mental note to track their progress.

Good luck everyone
submitted by DFSx42 to dfsports [link] [comments]

WGC Mexico Championship Golf Bets, DFS Picks and OAD Selections

Who does everyone like this weekend in Mexico?
Xander Schauffele, Bryson DeChambeau, Marc Leishman and Webb Simpson are my four favorite players based on their outright and DFS prices.
Will be playing Schauffele in OAD contest.
Here is some stuff that we did over at RotoBaller for this week's WGC Mexico Championship. If you have any questions about bets, DFS picks, or a particular players value, feel free to ask away! https://www.rotoballer.com/pga-dfs-vegas-report-wgc-mexico-championship/606045 (sports betting) https://www.rotoballer.com/pga-dfs-horse-for-the-course-wgc-mexico-championship/605966 (DFS picks) https://www.rotoballer.com/rotoballer-pga-one-and-done-staff-picks-wgc-mexico-championship/606305 (OAD Selections)
submitted by teeoffsports to dfsports [link] [comments]

PGA Championship Tiered Rankings and Betting Guide

Hi guys, I've been pretty busy with work recently but back in time to post for the next major. I still haven't finished scraping and compiling course fit but since I have everything else ready, I decided to go ahead and post what I got right now.
It's a tiered rankings of the guys my model likes the most. I'll update it accordingly once course fit is done but that's unlikely to really make too much of an impact.
Oosthuizen and Kisner are major surprises rounding out the the top 18.
My favorite betting option is Cantlay at 42:1 and Brooks Koepka offers the worst odds vs his simulated results, which would yield a -6% ROI.
Hope you enjoy, I'll post an update once course fit is done compiling. It's proving more difficult than usual with weather, conflicting scouting reports and that this event isn't regularly played at this course. Should have an update soon I hope. Just want to emphasize though that it won't make a significant impact.
submitted by DFSx42 to golf [link] [comments]

PGA Championship Player Pool

Click here for an introduction of me and the PGA model
Here are my rankings and betting picks for the entire field here on Fantasy Six Pack.
Work > Blogging
Hey guys, been really busy with work and business trips lately. Two weeks ago ran everything minutes before lock and didn’t have enough time to get in my dummy lineups. Ended up only getting in 5 lineups of the 10 so 1 of them just got ran out 6x. I was fortunate it min cashed but if you end up doing a lineup train due to time management then you’re clearly not doing something right. Needless to say I didn’t have the time to blog much about it that week.
Last week it was a similar issue but much better. I had some business trips and a lengthy layover where I thought it would be a good time to to run my model. I got everything done in time but then the laptop ran out of battery again after only converting about half the dummies into real lineups. I just decided to just embrace this as an opportunity to stop leaning so heavily on the model. I knew more or less who the model liked and created some lineups by hand. It was a nice breath of fresh air. I also didn’t blog that week because when traveling for work, I’m basically working non stop and when I’m free I choose to head outside and explore as much as possible.
Poker & the Ego
I also played some live poker in a casino for the first time in years. The stakes were low and I only had enough cash on hand to play short stacked but man played awful. I folded 99 flop shove on a low board and then folded TT to a 3bet pre. Looking back, my play was horrendous. I still can’t understand how or why I did what I did. The amount at stake was trivial compared to what I used to play, less than what I put in a single dfs h2h so I can’t possibly have been financially at scared and yet I played like scared money and nit folded in spots where I clearly had the best hand.
I want to try telling myself that I was tired and jetlagged and not properly adjusting to the short stacks in play that night. But the fact remains that I played like garbage and that has shaken me thoroughly. I was fine not playing poker anymore, but for some odd reason I’m only fine not playing poker anymore so long as in my mind I’m still a great player. If I’m a horrible player then that gives me all this incentive to play again and get that mojo back. Which is paradoxically the opposite of how I should approach the game. If I no longer got it, then that’s all the more reason to remain retired. But my ego just won’t allow me to sit idly by typing away here thinking someone out there should be facing my 3bet right now. The mind is a very odd thing indeed. I’ve been on the verge of downloading the software and getting back into the game in earnest even though there’s a multitude of reasons why I got out – primarily that it’s not something I particularly enjoy anymore.
The Change in Approach
Given the tight deadlines I had in previous slates, I decided to start taking a more proactive approach with my model. While much of it must wait until the day before as I wait on the latest information, there’s still a lot of things that won’t change like historical information that I don’t need to wait until the last minute. I started this one earlier than ever and it was very refreshing to be able to casually peruse what I had, knowing there were several days available. Inevitably, there’s a lot of things that I wanted to change or add onto but didn’t have the time available and really spent a good amount of time back in the lab, researching and making relevant adjustments. I’ve also been capitalizing on using this early start to get a good overall grasp of the field. I did this creating a tiered ranking system of the players, which I’ve been publishing over at fantasy six pack.
The Player Pool
This slate there’s a lot of players my model really loved. Normally it latches onto a few guys and then builds around them with some scrubs, this wasn’t the case this time as it had a larger player pool than ever.
Dustin Johnson
Rory McIlroy
Lucas Glover
Corey Conners
Jon Rahm
Patrick Cantlay
Henrik Stenson
Hideki Matsuyama
Jason Kokrak
Luke List
Paul Casey
Cameron Champ
Matthew Fitzpatrick
Sergio Garcia
Aaron Wise
Bubba Watson
Joel Dahmen
Adam Scott
Bronson Burgoon
Kyle Stanley
Jordan Spieth
Tiger Woods
Jim Furyk
Alexander Bjork
Brooks Koepka
Jason Day
Tommy Fleetwood
Keith Mitchell
Kevin Kisner
Louis Oosthuizen
Cameron Smith
Francesco Molinari
Justin Rose
Richy Werenski
Charley Hoffman
Rickie Fowler
Brian Gay
Alex Noren
Eddie Pepperell
Matt Wallace
Max Homa
Adam Long
Scott Piercy
Ian Poulter
Keegan Bradley
Billy Horschel
Michael Thompson
Chesson Hadley
The Trim
This was harder than usual, frankly, very few of the lineups it spit out were ones that I didn’t naturally fall in love with. However, I’m playing just 10 so I had to make some tough cuts. I went in with a goal not so much to choose the best individual lineups but rather remove the lone wolves who only showed up a few times and then make sure I wasn’t exposed to anyone over 50%. The end result was this.
Rory McIlroy
Dustin Johnson
Corey Conners
Henrik Stenson
Lucas Glover
Hideki Matsuyama
Matthew Fitzpatrick
Jon Rahm
Luke List
Cameron Champ
Bubba Watson
Patrick Cantlay
Jason Kokrak
Paul Casey
Sergio Garcia
Tiger Woods
Kevin Kisner
Louis Oosthuizen
Cameron Smith
Adam Scott
Aaron Wise
Jim Furyk
Guys I Really Like More Than My Player Pool Indicates
I’m particularly high on Oosthuizen, Cantlay, Smith, Conners & Fitzpatrick.
Thoughts on Tiger
This is not an emotional argument. The stats of his are truly quite impressive. He's back for sure and easily a top 10 golfer for this tournament and arguably top 5.
Guys I Will Be Watching
I’ll be paying close attention to Campillo, Homa, Burgoon, Thompson, Jazz & Suri. These are all guys that my model really liked. I feel if pricing were a bit tougher (they always make it easy jamming in your favorites for majors) then I’d have a lot more of those guys. Fortunately, I’m not faced with wondering if I should be playing a Campillo/Homa stack but can just make a mental note to track their progress.
Good luck everyone
submitted by DFSx42 to pga [link] [comments]

PGA DFS: Wyndham Championship Picks - Dynasty Football Factory

Sedgefield Country Club will play host to the Wyndham Championship. It’s a par 70 that plays just a shade under 7,200 yards. The greens here aren’t small by any means, but at an average of 6,500 square feet, they are much smaller than the greens at the PGA Championship last week. As the golfers make their way around the track in Greensboro, NC, they’ll face a fair bit of trouble. Sedgefield features 76 bunkers and 16 water hazards. The greens, fairways, and rough are all bermudagrass this week.
Course and Event Facts
The three previous winners of this event are making the start here again in 2018. Henrik Stenson ($11,100), Si Woo Kim ($8,800), and Davis Love III ($6,500) have each hoisted the trophy over the past three years. This will be the 11th straight year this tournament is held here. In that time, the winning score has ranged anywhere from 14-under to 22-under. Getting off to a hot start is essential here. Only one winner in the past decade has come from outside of the Top 20 after the first round. Seven of the past ten winners have had at least a share of the 54-hole lead.
There is a pretty significant advantage to finding fairways at Sedgefield CC. Golfers who’ve finished in the Top 5 of DK points here have averaged a 36.8 Driving Distance ranking compared to a 27.7 Driving Accuracy ranking. Of that group of 51 golfers, 41 have hit at least 60% of fairways. Strokes Gained: Off the Tee, and Driving Accuracy each explain over 10% of DK Scoring. Driving distance, on the other hand, only explains about 1% of DK Scoring here. Over the past 24 rounds, Henrik Stenson ($11,000) and Ryan Moore ($9,000) lead the field in Fairways Gained according to Fantasy National.
When we’re looking for DK Points, the approach game can’t go overlooked. Of the 250 golfers who have finished in the Top 20 of DK Scoring, only 33 lost strokes on approach. In that same group, only 30 golfers have hit less than 70% of greens. When winning scores hover around 20-under, you need birdie opportunities. Daniel Berger ($9,300), Tyler Duncan ($7,300), and Henrik Stenson ($11,000) are the top three in the field when it comes to Strokes Gained: Approach over the past 24 rounds.
Narratives
The Wyndham Championship never has much of a chance at a strong field considering its spot in the schedule. Sandwiched between the final major of the year and the first week of the FedEx Cup Playoffs, it rarely sees a strong field. There are exactly zero golfers from the Top 15 OWGR making the start at Sedgefield CC. In fact, there are only 8 golfers in the Top 50 OWGR. One of the more popular narratives this week will be centered around the FedEx Cup Playoffs, though, as this is the last chance for many golfers to qualify for the Northern Trust next week. Chad Campbell ($7,700), Robert Garrigus ($7,000), and Corey Conners ($6,500) are the first three just outside of the bubble as things stand now.
Expensive Golfers ($9,500+)
There’s a trio of golfers in the $11,000 range with Webb Simpson ($11,600), Hideki Matsuyama ($11,300), and Henrik Stenson ($11,300). From a fit perspective, Stenson has won this event before, and his ability to keep his tee ball in play is an obvious advantage here. He missed the cut at the PGA last week, but it was largely due to his putting as he gained strokes in every other category. He’s 5th in SG: Off the Tee and 4th in SG: Approach over the past 24 rounds.
Rafa Cabrera-Bello ($10,100) caught fire on Sunday, shooting a bogey-free 64 to vault into the Top 10. One of the most impressive parts of his week was how he gained strokes consistently across all categories. If you’re looking for a reason to play someone, an all-around game is a good place to start, and RCB showed all parts of his game last weekend. He’s made six straight cuts, including three Top 25s. The bermudagrass greens will play into his hands as well since he’s positive on that surface.
Joaquin Niemann ($9,700) and Billy Horschel ($9,600) are at the top of the $9k range and could be two of my favorite plays this week. Niemann has everything going for him. The 19-year-old is 1st in DK Points, 4th in SG: Off the Tee, and 9th in GIRs Gained over the past 24 rounds. Horschel is 13th, 1st, and 6th in those same categories, respectively. They both can be a bit shaky when it comes to their short games, but I’ll target ball-striking and hope to find a hot putter between these two ball-strikers.
Mid-Range Golfers ($9,500 – $7,000)
Sedgefield CC is the ultimate “old man” course. Low scores require precision off the tee and hitting greens in regulation. Steve Stricker ($8,300) makes a ton of sense at a course like this. He’s 5th overall in my course fit model. While it’s easy to assume he doesn’t have upside for DK purposes, it’s not true. He’s 14th in DK Points over his past 24 rounds. He’s Top 35 in this field in everything from GIRs Gained to Fairways Gained, according to Fantasy National, which is what we’re looking for this week.
There are a few GPP fliers worthy of consideration in the low $7,000 range. Chris Kirk ($7,500), Bronson Burgoon ($7,400), Tyler Duncan ($7,300), and Sam Ryder ($7,300) are all Top 10 in DK points over the past 24 rounds, according to Fantasy National. We’re chasing upside once we get into this range of golfers and all four of those guys have proved they can score in bunches. If you’re looking for a cash play here, Rory Sabbatini ($7,400) fits the bill. After missing a couple of cuts, he seems to has gotten his ball-striking back on track and has a 12th place finish his last time out.
Dart Throws (Sub – $7,000)
In this range, I’m looking for the best combination of SG: OTT/Fairways Gained, and Approach Game with some DK Points upside factored in. Here are some of the highlights from that model:
Mac Hughes ($6,800) is 15th overall in the model I put together that only factors in those inputs over the past 24 rounds. Corey Conners ($6,500) is 33rd and has the FedEx Cup #narrative on his side. Hunter Mahan ($6,900) is 27th. Brandon Harkins ($6,900) is 98th percentile in my course fit model. Course Fit Simulator
I wrote a program that simulates DK Scoring based on how they’ve performed, historically, on certain types of holes. This is skewed a bit towards upside and doesn’t have any recent form baked in. It takes a look at all of the holes played since the start of the 2018 season. The top twenty are listed below:
Joaquin Niemann ($9,700) Andres Romero ($7,000) Brandon Harkins ($6,900) Steve Stricker ($8,300) Webb Simpson ($11,600) Rafa Cabrera-Bello ($10,100) Rory Sabbatini ($7,400) Brian Gay ($7,100) Ryan Blaum ($7,200) Billy Horschel ($9,600) Ollie Schniederjans ($8,600) Sam Ryder ($7,300) Henrik Stenson ($11,000) Scott Piercy ($7,200) Shane Lowry ($10,000) Cameron Percy ($6,600) David Lingmerth ($7,000) Tom Lovelady ($7,000) Hunter Mahan (6,900) Tyler Duncan ($7,300) Thanks for reading and good luck this weekend. You can find me on Twitter @MattJonesTFR.
Get in on the action at GT Bets, an Official Sponsor of the Dynasty Football Factory. Are you looking to get some action in on today’s games? Head over http://GTBets.eu for all of your sports betting needs with updated odds covering all major sports. The bottom line… GTBets.eu will have you placing your first bet within minutes with their simple to use registration process. So, register now and earn up to $500 in free money! Simply add FACTORY in the “referred by” field to get the highest possible welcome bonus!
submitted by ShamelesssShane to dfsports [link] [comments]

2019 PGA Championship @ Bethpage Black Bets

Here's my plays for the PGA Championship being played @ Bethpage Black this weekend for anyone interested (first round starts in the morning):
- 0.8 U Bubba Watson top 20 finish (+200). Bubba has finished in the top 20 at Bethpage in the last 3 majors he has played there
- 0.5 U Jason Day top 5 finish (+500). Has a great history at Bethpage Black. Could even be a good bet to win the tourney at +2200 odds.
- 0.5 U Jason Day top Aussie (+150). I feel Day will golf well at Bethpage Black again and really the only other golfer that could give him a run for his money is Adam Scott who has not been in amazing form recently (didnt make the cut the last 2/4 PGA events)
- 0.5 U Jason day top Australasian (+175). Same reason as above.
- 0.4 U Patrick Cantlay to finish top 20 (+163). Cantlay can drive the ball well which will be valuable this weekend considering the course is a long one and very straight. Although he didnt make the cut in his last tourney, he made top 10 in the previous tourneys he has golfed in (one of them being a 9th place finish in the Masters)

Here's my predictions for winners (note: I hedged these. Total units wagered: 1.7 U... Lowest possible win: +9.2 U):
- 0.8 U on Tiger (+1100) cause he's Tiger and I want to see him win again after that amazing Masters victory. How can you not bet Tiger?
- 0.2 U on Sergio Garcia (+4000). In his last 4 PGA events he finished in the top 5 3 times!!! (but he didnt make the cut the 1 time he didnt crack top 5 which was in the Masters). I think he is bound to win an event/major and these odds are just great
- 0.2 U on Bubba Watson (+5000). As previously mentioned, Bubba always plays this course well and also driving is gonna be a big factor this weekend and Bubba can crush the fucking ball. Odds are too good not to slam a dollar or two on him IMO
- 0.8 U on Rory McIlroy (+1100). Definitely my favorite golfer to win this weekend. He has been the most consistent player on the tour this season (8 top 10 finishes in last 10 tourneys and hes made the cut every time this season) and history shows he plays this course well. He can crush the ball, his driving accuracy is decent, and his approach is great which are all factors that are going to matter most this weekend considering the course the tourney is held on.
submitted by ajflegs to sportsgambling [link] [comments]

WatcH/LivE}} PGA Tour 2018 LIVE WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play Live Streaming

2018 WGCDell Match Play picks bracket format Its a loaded field in Austin 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play odds Picks from the model that predicted Tiger Woods run Fantasy Insider WGCDell Technologies Match Play Corales Puntacana Resort Club Championship More for 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play
Live ► http://bit.ly/2BbidBA
2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play tee times viewers guide
22 hours ago Icon Sportswire AUSTIN TX MARCH 25 Dustin Johnson watches his approach shot on the twelfth hole during the quarterfinals of the WCGDell Technologies Match Play on March 25 2017 at the Austin Country Club in Austin TXPhoto by John RiveraIcon Sportswire via Getty Images The PGA Tour Live blog WGCDell Technologies Match Play Draw PGA Tour
1 day ago AUSTIN Texas Jordan Spieth and Patrick Reed have been on the same side as American teammates in a dozen matches Now theyll try to beat each other at this weeks World Golf ChampionshipsDell Technologies Match Play 2018 WGCDell Match Play picks bracket format Its a loaded field in
16 hours ago The WGCDell Technologies Match Play has some work to do this week to live up to the last month of PGA Tour golf After five weeks of Bubba Watson Justin Thomas Phil Mickelson Paul Casey and Rory McIlroy raising trophies the final test for most Masters golfers will go down this week in Austin Texas 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play odds Picks from the model
14 hours ago The PGA Tour is heading to Austin Texas this week for the 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play Arnold Palmer Invitational winner Rory McIlroy is the Vegas favorite at 71 followed closely by last years Match Play champion Dustin Johnson at 81 McIlroy opened at 152 before moving up the odds 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play Wikipedia
The 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play will be the 20th WGC Match Play to be played March 21–25 at Austin Country Club in Austin Texas It will be the second of four World Golf Championships in 2018 Contents hide 1 Field 11 Nationalities in the field 12 Past champions in the field 2 Format 3 Results Dates‎ ‎March 21–25 2018 Location‎ ‎Austin Texas‎ US Tours‎ ‎PGA Tour‎ ‎European Tour‎ ‎Japan Golf Format‎ ‎Match play‎ – 18 holes ‎Field · ‎Format · ‎Results · ‎Pool play WGCDell Technologies Match Play groups revealed | Golf
Tuesday March 20 2018 A firstround Texan showdown between Ryder Cup teammates Jordan Spieth and Patrick Reed headlined the Monday night release of the WGCDell Technologies Match Play set to begin Wednesday at Austin Country Club The 64 players in this weeks field were determined by their world PGA Tour 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play tee times TV
16 hours ago Check here for groupings tee times for the WGCDell Technologies Match Play 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play 2018 Time TV channel how to
14 hours ago The PGA Tour this week is heading to Austin Texas — the first of five events in the state — for the WGCDell Technologies Match Play It is the third WGC World Golf Championship event of the season and the fourth year of the events new pool play format The pool play features 16 groups comprised of First Look WGCDell Technologies Match Play Groups | Golf Channel
First Look WGCDell Technologies Match Play groups By Rex HoggardMarch 19 2018 720 pm AUSTIN Texas – Although professional golfs version of March Madness is considered just plain maddening in some circles following the switch to roundrobin play three years ago its still one of the games most compelling Searches related to 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play European Tour WGC Dell Technologies Match Play 2018
Five Things To Know WGCDell Technologies Match Play · world number one dustin johnson is the man to beat in the fourth edition of the roundrobin match play format as rory mcilroy returns after claiming a first victory in 18 months last week here are five things to know about the wgcdell technologies match play… Fantasy Golf Picks 2018 WGC Match Play Rankings DraftKings
17 hours ago This Weeks Event 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play Pat Mayo and Geoff Fienberg debate their 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play picks preview the new DraftKings contest and potential strategies and make their bracket selections for this weeks event at Austin Country Club 2018 WGC 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play expert picks rankings
21 hours ago 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play expert picks rankings fantasy golf and betting tips for Draft Kings Yahoo FanDuel Golf Channel PGATour fantasy games 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play FantasyLabs
14 hours ago The Daily Fantasy Flex PGA 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play Tuesdays Photos from the 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play
18 hours ago GolfWRX is live this week from the 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play event at Austin Country Club par 71 7108 yards a 1984 Pete Dye design The match play field is stacked including the world No 1ranked Dustin Johnson the reigning FedExCup champion Justin Thomas the reigning Upgraded hospitality at WGCDell Technologies Match Play
2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play United Fairway Club 15th Green Austin Country Club – Austin Texas Wednesday March 21 to Sunday March 25 2018 Watch the top 64 players in the Official World Golf ranking compete in the 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play at Austin Country Club on March 2125 2018 WGCDell Technologies Match Play Optimal DraftKings Fantasy
22 hours ago Before you set your PGA DFS lineups on DraftKings for the WGCDell Technologies Match Play you need to hear what Mike McClure has to say McClure is Fantasy Golf Picks The WGCDell Technologies Match Play
19 hours ago Its time for the WGCDell Technologies Match Play 2018 Get our daily fantasy DFS golf experts best lineup picks for DraftKings success World Golf ChampionshipsDell Technologies Match Play Schedule Gates Open 7 am Course open to Austin Country Club Dell employees Grounds Clubhouse Access only Practice Round for Professionals World Golf Championships Dell Match Play Bracket Special 6 8 pm Live on Golf Channel Paramount Theatre TICKETS
wgc dell match play 2015
2018 dell match play
2017 wgc dell match play results
wgc dell match play 2017 prize money
dell match play format
wgc match play qualifications
world golf championships dell technologies match play wiki
wgc match play 2018 groups
submitted by misiralik to DellMatchPlay2018 [link] [comments]

ESPN Player Confidential (Insider article, but text within)

From here: http://espn.go.com/golf/insidestory/_/id/15483181/our-first-anonymous-pro-unloads
Collins: What do you honestly think about the wraparound season?
Anonymous Player: I think it's terrible. There's no reason for it. We play nine months. There's a FedEx winner at the end of September. I think we should have three months off like everyone else. But we're still short of every other sport. Every other sport is six months [off]. We have barely a month. ... The reason we have to do it is because we don't have an owner like every other sport. ...
I think it's a joke. We have 47 tournaments in the calendar year. So people are like, "Why don't we ever get to see Rory [McIlroy] in this? Why don't we get to see Jason Day in this? Why don't we get to see Tiger in this?" ... We have too many events. If we had 25 events and all 25 events all counted for a lot of [FedEx Cup] points and a lot of money, you would see a lot of your favorite players in 20 of those events because they would have to play. ... So unfortunately for all these great tournament directors and all these great tournaments that are trying to put on all these great events, they're only going to see their top guys, I mean if they're lucky, I mean I'm talking like Powerball lucky, they're going to see their guy maybe once. Maybe once. That's unfortunate.
If it was a more condensed field, a more condensed tournament schedule, you would see your great players play ... [they'd] have to play every week. And it would mean more every single week. When you have so many tournaments, those guys don't have to play.
Q: So what does that mean for the guys at the bottom? Doesn't that give them a chance?
A: It gives them a chance, but let's be honest -- who moves the needle? The top 50 [on the PGA Tour], not the bottom 50. What the tour has done is create tournaments for the bottom 50. Nobody cares about the bottom 50. ... All they've done is create jobs and money for those guys because the top 50 aren't playing those events.
Look at [the] Dell Match Play Championship against [the] Puerto Rico [Open at Coco Beach]. Tony Finau won. Now Tony Finau is a great player. Don't get me wrong. Good winner. Long player. Nice player. He won. Could he beat Jason Day? Probably not. Could he beat seven players in a row to beat Jason Day in the Match Play? We don't know ... which is another reason why Phil Mickelson said opposite events should not count.
Q: At all?
A: They shouldn't count. They shouldn't even be there.
Q: Really?
A: No, I don't think they should be there.
Q: It didn't get him into the Masters. But for a guy like Finau, how does he get an opportunity to play against the best guys?
A: He has to play better in the big events. ... [and an opposite-field win] should not be a two-year exemption. If you're not going to get into the Masters and you're not going to get full [FedEx Cup] points, and if you're only going to get 250 points, which 500 points is a full win, you should only get a one-year exemption.
Q: Does [the wraparound schedule] change the way you schedule your events?
A: A little bit. It's too long. The sad thing is, it doesn't even matter about me. It matters about the top 20 in the world. The top 20 in the world are not going to play these events. The top 20 in the world move the needle. Tiger used to move the needle a lot.
Q: Tiger was the needle.
A: He was the needle. He's not around anymore. We don't know if he's coming around again. We hope [he will], but we can't count on that. Now you take the Jordan Spieths, you take the Jason Days, you take these young guns, they're still not Tiger. Nobody's ever going to be Tiger. We know that. Lotta people don't know that. But they're not going to be.
The great play of Jason Day, the great play of Jordan Spieth, the great play of Rickie Fowler -- combined, they're not Tiger. ... They're just not. Tiger is Tiger. It's a Michael Jordan. You cannot compare. It's actually, in my opinion, it's an embarrassment and an insult to compare those guys to a Tiger Woods. ... It's an absolute embarrassment to say that a Rory McIlroy, a Jason Day, a Jordan Spieth, Rickie Fowler, all these guys are going to compete with Tiger's records. Combined, they don't even have half his records yet. ...
Now I talked to a certain individual about this on the PGA Tour -- older veteran -- and he said the same exact thing. We're catering to the bottom 50 as opposed to the top 50. ... If you're an exempt player, and if [you're a top] 125 guy from the year before, you really don't have to worry about your job because if you play well, you're going to keep that status.
Now if you played in all the West Coast [events], if you played in Honda, if you played in Bay Hill, if you get in the invitationals and you played just decent, you don't have to worry about a guy that played well in an opposite event because the opposite event is trying to take care of the guy from 150-200 on the list. Which, now that sounds nice, now you've given the guy an opportunity to make some money ... but it's not moving anything. It's not helping anything.
Q: Do fans come out to see the top five guys?
A: I'll put [Spieth, Day, Fowler and McIlroy] on one end of the range, and I'll put Tiger over here, alone. Where do you think the crowd's going? Four combined. Those four combined over here. I'm going to give you 100,000 fans, walk into a place. Jordan Spieth, Jason Day, Rickie Fowler, Rory McIlroy. And I'm going to put Tiger on the other end, 100 yards away. Where do you think the fans are going?
Q: That's easy. They're going to Tiger.
A: One hundred percent.
Q: What's the one question you get asked about that you have to lie about the most?
A: What do you think of the top players? Bubba [Watson], Rory [McIlroy], Rickie [Fowler], Jason Day, these [players] that are actually taking over now. Those are questions we get asked all the time. And I will tell you, flat out, they're nice players. ... I'm not taking anything away from them. They're very good. ... [But] I don't see them as a needle-mover. If you go through the players from 1900 to today, I don't see them as a [Ben] Hogan. I don't see them as a [Byron] Nelson. I don't see them as a [Arnold] Palmer, [Jack] Nicklaus, Tiger. The last one's a Tiger. ... After that, we're talking about nobody. Nice players who are going to make a lot of money, but that's it. If we're talking about game-changers, we don't have a game-changer yet.
Q: So when people ask you, what do you think about the new guys, you gotta be like, oh these guys are fantastic ...
A: They're fantastic. They've beaten the f--- out of me [on the golf course]. They have, and that's fine. I've seen the next greatest thing ever come up [in Woods]. If anyone wants to compare his 10 years, even his like five years, to anybody, I'm all ears. ... Nonetheless, what he has done, these kids of today ... combined, still have a long way to go. Combined. ... Rickie doesn't have a major. Jason Day has what? One. Jordan Spieth has two. Rory has four. That's seven. That's half. That's half [of Woods' 14 majors].
Q: Which would you rather have, an Olympic gold medal or a win in a PGA Tour event?
A: I'll take my [PGA] win every day of the week. You know why? Mine pays money. I gotta live. I gotta eat. I gotta pay bills. Mine paid me a million dollars. And a two-year exemption on tour. What is the Olympics going to give you? You know who [picks an Olympic win]? You know who says that? The guy who is already making $30-40 million a year. He doesn't care.
If you want to [ask] the 75th and 76th guy on tour, you're going to get a different answer. ...
The guy who's No. 1 in the world, if he's [an American], let's say [the guys who are Nos. 3 and 6 in the world rankings], those guys are making a lot of money. They've got multiple wins. ... Of course they're going to give you that answer. ... I'll give you a bet: You go to [a PGA Tour event] and say, go up to a 100 to 125 guy on the money list last year and go, "Would you rather take a PGA Tour win or an Olympic [gold medal]." You can have a PGA Tour win and a million dollars, plus a two-year exemption, and you're counting your contract money or an Olympic win with zero money and zero contract money. You know what the answer is. ...
[Players from Nos.] 10 to 200 in the world are on my side.
submitted by jpole1 to ProGolf [link] [comments]

According to updated golf odds, Rory McIlroy and Justin Thomas are 12-1 co-favorites to win the 2020 Travelers Championship. Bryson DeChambeau is next at 13-1, followed by last week's RBC Heritage winner Webb Simpson (18-1). Continue reading to see the full list of Travelers Championship golf betting odds. 2020 Travelers Championship Best Value Picks. Bubba Watson (+2900): A three-time winner of this event, Bubba epitomizes the perfect horse for this course. Also has a runner-up and fourth place result around this track. Joaquin Niemann (+4000): Contended down the stretch at last week’s RBC Heritage before an untimely bogey on the 71st hole, settling for a tie for fifth after a 63-65 weekend. PGA Championship betting strategy. The three key areas on which to focus when betting the PGA Championship or any PGA Tour tournament are Current Form, Course History, and Key Stats. There’s no relevant course history for TPC Harding Park, as the last events it hosted were the 2009 Presidents Cup and 2005 WGC-Cadillac Match Play, won by McIlroy. The 2020 PGA Championship will be the 102nd edition of the tournament and is scheduled for May 14-17 at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco, California.This will be the first major championship to be held at a TPC property and the first PGA Championship to be held in San Francisco. 2020 PGA Championship odds and betting preview from TPC Harding Park in San Francisco, California on August 3-9. For the first time in PGA Tour history, the PGA Championship will be the first major played in the 2019-20 season.

[index] [10786] [14592] [10778] [6318] [5505] [6531] [7653] [10880] [8545] [2833]