Affiliate Blog Tips | All you need to know about how to

Other Source Of Income

Hello all of you who are reading this post . I'm a digital marketer for a quite of time which I like and its the only source of my income, now I want to add some more sources of income so that I don't have to depend on my job. I don't to want to leave in a fear of what will happen if I lose my job and all the thoughts which comes in a single job persons mind.
I know quite of few people who are doing job as well as freelancing to increase their income source, should I consider doing it? Because it looks like doing a job to me; like you will get paid till you are able to do the work, the time you stop, the income will also stop immediately. And that's the place I get stuck, I want to make a source of income where I don't have to worry about working, I work or not the income keeps coming in my account.
I was actually thinking of starting my own site and I choosed to go with wordpress. It will be a blogging site where I can put ads or do affiliate marketing.
So my questions are:
  1. What are the actual genuine ways to create income? Do share your experience.
  2. Should I go with wordpress? I was thinking to choose the basic wordpress blog plan. What do you think of it?
  3. How much time it till take to earn money from a blogging site through Ads and affiliate marketing?
It will be very much appreciated if you all can share your personal experiences so that it not only help me but also who are facing the same problem.
Thank you for reading this post, don't go without commenting.
submitted by SanjitKrBalmiki to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Newbie to the blogging world

Hi Guys,
I'm finally starting my venture to blogging related to life, travel and the people I meet along the way. The core purpose of the blog will not be to earn money at this point, but to talk about things that might get people interested in the blog.
I then later (after a year or more) intend to use the same blog to do affiliate marketing and possibly Adsense, to make some $.
However, there's some questions that are making me unsure.
Firstly, I wanted to ask, if my niche and approach to blogging is good, or not? And if you guys have any recommendations.
Secondly, I have to choose a domain name.. Do you guys have any recommendations about the domain and hosting I should take as a complete beginner? I was considering Hostgator's Hatchling plan. Also I was thinking of something like 'wasifwrites' (my name), 'cometravelwithme', 'letsbemindful', 'mylifeinmywords', 'letsgoexplore', 'placesandme', etc as my domain name options. Can you guys help me decide on one, or maybe recommend another considering my niche?
Other than the questions I asked, knowledge and recommendations about anything related to blogging, get more views, SEO, blogging-tools, etc would be highly appreciated as well.
-Thank you

P.S I'm going to choose Wordpress as my main blogging platform.
submitted by danbrown1233 to Blogging [link] [comments]

What web hosting solution would you recommend for a Wordpress blog about a niche hobby? I was going to go with Bluehost until I read the horror stories on here.

I have a domain through Google Domains, and I'm going to be setting up the blog via Wordpress. The idea is that it's a niche hobby blog that I'm hoping to for Amazon Affiliate link marketing, and I don't expect a ton of visitors. It's more of a "writing reviews of products I think people would like, and if I can make some money on the side that'd be great" kind of thing. I know a very basic amount of programming, and none of it is related to web development so I'd prefer not having to write any code myself, at least at first.
Most of the people I've spoken to recommend either BlueHost, and it looks like according to Reddit they're pretty bad, so I'd like to explore some other options as well.
submitted by Repulsive-Divide to webhosting [link] [comments]

What am I? Webdesigner? Developer? Photographer? Fool?

I'm freelancing since 2016. I never studied anything that has anything to do with Web Development or any creative field.
At first i started making websites for myself (Affiliate Blogs) and earned some money of it. This was about 2008. Then i started to get interested in photography and getting more creative in customizing themes with wordpress. Then a friend asked if i build websites, i said yes, not knowing if i would actually be able to. For the first website i received about 200€. At the time i was still studying, but somehow people kept coming and asking if i could make them a website, every time i didn't know if i would be able to, but was surprised by myself that i could do it, with help of the internet and youtube tutorials of course. As time passed on, people came and asked for different stuff, like can you edit this pictures, can you make this image into a vector, etc. and every time (again, not knowing if i could actually do it) i said yes and so i learned, depending on the project different programs like Adobe Indesign, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Lightroom, After Effects, Premiere Pro, etc. .
Website requests got more complicated, shops, booking systems or multilanguage websites had to be made, so again, i got nervous but i got shit done. Every time getting a little more confident in my work i started to wonder if i could make my living with freelance work. So again, i just said yes, and everything kind of worked out. I do have enough projects, but not enough to have kids, and our dream is to have kids.
My idea is to get a part time job and still do my freelancing on the side. I'm about to start searching for agencies, but i don't know what i could actually tell them what i do and what i am. Here are some of the things that i have done:
Those are just some of the things i have done. I feel like i can do a lot of stuff but i can't do something 100% perfectly. What i enjoy most is talking to clients, listening to what they actually want and then giving them ideas, either with words or with sketches and them making the actual website/menus/posters/etc. I enjoy most of my work but i don't know how i could be someone to start working in an agency in a normal position. If someone is looking for a webdesigner, am i a webdesigner?
I feel like a restaurant that offers everything from pizza to hamburger and then some asian food on the side.
submitted by dudeins to web_design [link] [comments]

[For Hire] 🎨💻 Web Designer/Developer | UI/UX Design | Wordpress | Angular/React Apps | SEO | Next.js 3+ Years Experience

About

Hey, I'm Pedro. A Web Designer & Developer. With over 3 years of experience in the field and a degree in multimedia, I'm here to help you bring your next idea to life.

Services

Development

WordPress Development - WordPress design, development & optimizations.
Web App Development - Web Apps/PWA's using Angular or React
Static SSR Development - In case you're looking for a more Modern solution. I can build your website using JAMStack with Next.js

Design

UI/UX Web Design - Design your project from scratch using Figma.
UI/UX Redesign - Redesign and modernize your current website
Graphic Design - Posters, Infographics & Icons

Other

SEO & Speed Optimizations - Help you reach the front page of SERP's and increase your website's speed.
Affiliate Marketing - Need help getting into Affiliate marketing or optimizing your current website? Let's talk.

Latest Public Projects

Pedrospective - My Personal Blog built with Next.js
Hoi An Now - Redesign, Wordpress Development
Calisthenicz - Redesign, Wordpress Development & Speed Optimization
Here's an experimental version of my portfolio built with notion!

Pricing

Rate: 25$/hour, but I prefer working on fixed price projects.

Contact

Message me on Reddit if you need more info and to talk about your project or email me at [email protected]. Timezone: GMT+0/Lisbon
submitted by ThePlancher to forhire [link] [comments]

Had my own thing, now seeking job here

Hi,
I had my successful affiliate website for almost 15 years, so I know the ins and outs of affiliate and internet marketing, and online business in general. Now I'm in a different country and I'm seeking a fully remote job. Part time is fine, and I'm very flexible.
A few things I have done, and can do for you:
-- SEO. I'm extremely good with it. Pretty good with Google Analytics too.*
-- Setup or maintain WordPress sites complete with content, themes, plugins and any modification needed to make it work.
-- Handle support and email, be it from a customer, vendor... or from a state agency.
-- Help you with invoicing and collections.
-- Manage and create your ads, website, blogs, social media, mailings, including coming up with the content.
-- Manage and troubleshoot your UNIX server /VPS to at least a medium level via telnet or cPanel.
-- Research virtually everything for you, suggest new ways of doing things and be a devil's advocate.
-- Virtual Assistant type tasks, in addition to other duties, if needed.
*(Took Google's "Fundamentals of digital marketing" in a few hours, just to see.)
I can all of the above if needed, or I can focus on one or a few things that your company needs. I'm an extremely fast learner as well. In essence, I can do more or less everything needed to run a website /business.
I also have a college degree from a top US university. Specific details will be forwarded to interested parties.
In summary: if you need someone to do a mixture of things needed to run and expand your business, without the full cost of an employee, I'm your guy. Jack of all trades, but master of quite a few.
You get All of the above and 20 year online experience for just $20 an hour (I'm not living in USA right now.)
Contact me and let's take it from there!

P.S. Question that is asked:
Q: Why don't you your own thing etc. if you know this and that?
A: I did and might do it again in the years ahead, just at this point I need a job.
submitted by GloomyNectarine2 to Affiliatemarketing [link] [comments]

[FOR HIRE] Content Writing With Free Social Media Marketing Services ($0.05 Per Word Only)

I am relatively new to Reddit. I'm here to make connections and find new potential clients, ideally long term work. Someone who is -
Serious about his/her business
Believes in what he/she is selling
Want to grow their business/website with blogs/articles
*PLEASE DO NOT PM ME IF YOU WANT ME TO WRITE SPAMMY BLOGS/ARTICLE TOPICS!\*
I started working as a freelance content writer and gained new skills and experience in related fields over the course of three years.
● Written content for my own affiliate website, mainly product reviews, and informational articles.
● Managed multiple social media handles, especially Instagram and Facebook which gave me great insights and knowledge about social media marketing and how brand building on the internet works.
● Written over 50+ blogs under Finex Media Services.
● Currently working as a freelancer while also managing my own blog. In my blog, I write about how businesses can establish themselves as brands on the internet. I have written a lot of content on social media marketing as well. So, be sure to check it out.
My rates are relatively lower than other content writers: $0.05 - $0.06 Cents Per Word because I am new to Reddit and want to make genuine connections with people. So, please PM me, if you are in search of a content writer.
NOTE - Also, I’m looking to build my portfolio as a social media marketer. So, I am offering my social media marketing services for free for a month to people I will work with as a content writer. PM to know more about this.
submitted by Shivam5483 to HireaWriter [link] [comments]

How to achieve explosive startup growth!

Here is the summary of the book Traction: How any startup can achieve explosive growth.
I hope that you find it useful!

Traction is a sign that your startup is taking off. If you charge, it means customers are buying. If your product is free, it means your user base is growing.
If you have traction, all your technical, market, and team risks become easier to handle. It becomes easier to fund-raise, hire, do press, partnerships, and acquisitions.
Traction trumps everything.

How to think about Traction?

Almost every failed startup has a product. What failed startups don’t have is enough customers.
You should spend your time in parallel, both constructing your product and testing traction channels.
This is what we call the 50 percent rule: spend 50 percent of your time on product and 50% on traction. This rule seems simple but it’s hard to follow because the pull to spend all your attention on the product is strong. You’re probably making a startup because you want to build a particular product. You have a vision, but a lot of traction activities are unknown and outside your vision and comfort zone. So you try to avoid them. Don’t.
Doing product and traction in parallel has these benefits:
Before trying to get traction, you’ll need to define what traction means for your company. You need to set a traction goal. Maybe your current startup goal is to raise funding or become profitable. How many customers do you need and at what rate? You should then focus on marketing activities that result in a significant impact on your traction goal. It should move the needle.
Your startup has 3 phases:

Phase I: Make something people want

In phase 1, your product has the most leaks, it really doesn’t hold water. You shouldn’t scale up your efforts now, but it’s important to send a small amount of water through the bucket so you can see where the holes are and plug them. \ Your goal in phase 1 is to get your first customers and prove your product can get traction. You focus on building your initial product and getting traction in ways that don’t scale: giving talks, writing guest posts, emailing people you know, attending conferences, and doing whatever you can to get in front of customers.

Some founders believe that startups either take off or don’t. Actually startups take off because the founders make them take off!
– Paul Graham

Phase II: Market something people want

Once you hone your product, you have product-market fit and customers are sticking around. Now is the time to scale up your traction efforts. You fine-tune your positioning and marketing messages.

Phase III: Scale your business

As your company grows, smaller traction strategies stop moving the needle, so you’ll start to scale.
In phase 3 you have an established business model and significant position in the market, and you’re focused on scaling to further dominate the market and to profit.

Traction for funding

When pursuing funding, first contact individuals who understand what you’re working on. The better your investors understand what you’re doing, the less traction they’ll need to see before they invest. Also, try friends and family who may not need to see any traction before investing as they’re investing in you personally.

To pivot or not to pivot

Many startups give up way too early. The first thing to look for is evidence of real product engagement, even if it’s only a few dedicated customers. If you have such an engagement, you might be giving up too soon. Look for the bright spots in your customer base and see if you can expand from that base.

How to get traction? The Bullseye framework

The Bullseye framework helps you find the channel that will get you traction. Most businesses actually get zero distribution channels to work. If you can get even a single distribution channel to work, you have a great business. If you try for several but don’t nail one, you’re finished.
You’re aiming for bullseye: the one channel at the center of the target that will unlock your next growth stage. Here are the 3 Bullseye framework steps:

Find what’s possible: The outer-ring

The first step in Bullseye is brainstorming every single traction channel. It’s important not to dismiss any channel in this step. Think of at least one idea for each channel. For example, social ads is a traction channel. Running ads on Facebook or Twitter is a channel strategy within social ads. You could research what marketing strategies worked in your industry as well as the history of companies in your space.

Find what’s probable: The middle-ring

Go around your outer-ring and promote your best and most exciting ideas to your middle-ring. For each traction channel in your middle ring, now construct a cheap traction test you can run to find if the idea is good or not. These tests need to answer the following questions:
  1. What’s the cost of acquiring customers?
  2. How many customers are available?
  3. Are they the right type of customers for you now?
You want to design small scale tests that don’t require much up-front cost or effort. For example, run 4 Facebook ads instead of 40.

Find what’s working: The inner-ring

The final step in Bullseye is to only focus on one channel that will move the needle for your startup: your core channel. At any stage of your startup, you should have one traction channel that you’re focusing on and optimizing.
Most founders mess this up by keeping around distracting marketing efforts in other channels.
If search engine marketing is significantly better for you than other channels, you should focus all your efforts on this core channel and uncover additional strategies and tactics within it.
If no channel seems promising after testing, the whole process should be repeated. If you tried several times with no success, then your product may require more tweaking and your bucket might be still leaky.

How to test traction?

Middle-ring tests: You should be running several cheap tests that give you an indication of how successful a given channel strategy could be.
Inner ring tests:
You’re doing two things:
  1. Optimize your chosen channel strategy to make it the best it can be.
  2. Discover better channel strategies within this traction channel.
There is always a set of things you can tweak. For targeting blogs, you can tweak which blogs to target, type of content, call to action, etc. For search engine marketing, you can tweak keywords, ad-copy, demographics, and landing pages.
A common approach is to use A/B testing, where A is the control group and B is the experimental group. The purpose of it is to measure the effectiveness of change in a button color, an ad image, or a different message on a web page. If the experimental group performs significantly better, you can apply the change, get the benefits, and run another test.
You can use tools such as Optimizely, Visual Website Optimizer, and Unbounce.
Over time, all marketing channels become saturated. To combat this, you should always be trying to discover new strategies and tactics within your channel and conduct small experiments. Also, experiment with new marketing platforms while they’re still in their infancy.

Tools

To track your tests you could start with a simple spreadsheet or use an analytics tool with cohort analysis. You’ll need to answer these questions:
  1. How many people landed on the website?
  2. What are the demographics of my best and worst customers?
  3. Are customers who interact with my support team more likely to stay?
A basic analytics tool like Clicky, Mixpanel, or Chartbeat can help you with these questions. You can use a spreadsheet as the tool to rank and prioritize traction channel strategies. You should include columns like how many customers are available, conversion rate, the cost to acquire a customer, lifetime value of a customer for every given strategy.

How to focus on the right traction goals? The critical path framework

Define your traction goal

You should always have an explicit traction goal you’re working towards. This could be 1,000 paying customers or 100 new daily customers, or 10% of your market. You want a goal where hitting the mark would change things significantly for your company’s outcome.
Once that is defined, you can work backward and set clear time-based subgoals. Such as reaching 1,000 customers by next quarter.
The key is to follow the critical path towards that goal and exclude all features and marketing activities that don’t help you reach your goal. Everything you decide to do should be assessed against your critical path.

Avoid traction biases

Your competitive advantage may be acquiring customers in ways your competition isn’t. That’s why it’s critical to avoid have traction biases. Stop your urge to refuse channels like speaking engagements, sales or affiliate marketing, business development, or trade shows just because you hate talking on the phone or you find the channel annoying or time-consuming.

Targetting blogs

Targeting blogs that your prospective customers read is one of the best ways to get your first wave customers.
Mint’s initial series of tests revealed that targeting blogs should be its core channel. They asked users to embed an “I want mint” badge on their personal blogs and rewarded them with a VIP access before other invitations were sent out. They also directly sponsored blogs. They sent bloggers a message with “Can I send you $500” as the subject and told them a bit about the product.
To find smaller blogs in your niche:
You can also target link-sharing communities like Reddit, Product Hunt, and Hacker News.
Dropbox, Codecademy, Quora, and Gumroad all got their first customers by sharing their products on HackerNews because their products were a good fit for users on that site.

Publicity

Starting out, an article in TechCrunch or The Huffington Post can boost your startup in the eyes of potential customers, investors, or partners. If you have a fascinating story with broad appeal, media outlets will want to hear from you.
It’s easier to start smaller when targeting big media outlets. Sites like TechCrunch and Lifehacker often pick up stories from smaller forums like Hacker News and subreddits. Instead of approaching TechCrunch, try blogs that TechCrunch reads and get story ideas from. It’s easier to get a smaller blog’s attention. Then you might get featured on TechCrunch and then The New York Times which reads TechCrunch!
What gets a reporter’s attention?
A good press angle makes people react emotionally. If it’s not interesting enough to elicit emotion, you don’t have a story worth pitching.
A good first step is using a service like Help A Reporter Out (HARO), where reporters request sources for articles they’re working on. It could get you a mention in the piece and help establish your credibility. Also, you could offer reporters commentary on stories related to your industries.
You can use Twitter to reach reporters online; almost all of them have Twitter accounts and you’d be surprised how few followers many of them have, but they can be highly influential with their content.
Once you have a solid story, you want to draw as much attention to it as you can:
Once your story has been established as a popular news item, try to drag it out as long as you can. Offer interviews that add to the story. Start “How We Did This” follow-up interviews.
As your startup grows you may consider hiring a PR firm or consultant.

Unconventional PR

Nearly every company attempts traditional publicity, but only a few focus on stunts and other unconventional ways to get buzz.

The publicity stunt

Customer Appreciation

Be awesome to your customers. Shortly after Alexis Ohanian launched Hipmunk, he sent out luggage tags and a handwritten note to the first several hundred people who mentioned the site on Twitter.
Holding a contest is also a great repeatable way to generate publicity and get word of mouth. Shopify has an annual Build a Business competition.
Great customer support is so rare that, if you make your customers happy, they’re likely to spread the news of your awesome product. Zappos is one of the best-known examples of a company with incredible customer service and they classify support as a marketing investment.

Search Engine Marketing (SEM)

SEM is placing ads on search engines like Google. It’s sometimes called “pay-per-click” because you only pay when a user clicks on an ad.
SEM works well for companies looking to sell directly to their target customer. You’re capturing people who are actively searching for solutions.
Click-Through Rate (CTR) The percentage of ad impressions that result in clicks to your site.
Cost per Click (CPC) The amount it costs to buy a click on an ad.
Cost per Acquisition (CPA) How much it costs you to acquire a customer, not just a click. If you buy clicks at $1 and 10% of people who hit your site make a purchase. This makes your CPA at $10.
CPA = CPC / conversion percentage

SEM to get early customer data

You can use SEM as a way to get early customer data in a controlled and predictable way. Even if you don’t expect to be profitable, you can decide to spend a certain amount of money to get an early base of customers and users to inform you about important metrics such as landing page conversion rates, average cost per customer, and lifetime value.
Archives.com used AdWords to drive traffic to their landing pages, even before they built a product, to test interest in a specific product approach. By measuring the CTR for each ad and conversions, they determined which product aspects were the most compelling to potential customers and what those people would actually pay for. When they finally built their product, they built something they knew the market would want.

SEM strategy

Find high-potential keywords, group them into ad groups, and test different ad copy and landing pages within each ad group. As data flows in, remove underperforming ads and landing pages and make tweaks to keep improving results.
Use tools like Optimizely and Visual Website Optimizer to run A/B tests on your landing pages.

Keyword research

Use Google’s keyword planner to discover top keywords your target customers use to find products like yours. You could also use tools such as KeywordSpy, SEMrush, and SpyFu to discover keywords your competition is using.
You can refine your keyword list by adding more terms to the end of each base term to create long-tail keywords. They’re less competitive and have lower search volumes which makes them ideal for testing on smaller groups of customers.
SEM is more expensive for more competitive keywords, so you’ll need to limit yourself to keywords with profitable conversion rates.
You shouldn’t expect your campaigns to be profitable right away, but if you can run a campaign that breaks even after a short period of time, then SEM could be an excellent channel for you to focus on.

Writing ads

Write ads with titles that are catchy, memorable, and relevant to the keywords you’ve paired with it. Include the keyword at least once in the body of your ad and conclude with a prominent call to action like “Check out discounted Nike sneakers!”
Each of your ads and ad groups will have a quality score associated with it. A high-quality score will get you better ad placements and better ad pricing. Click-through rate has the biggest influence on quality score, so you should tailor your ads to the keywords. Google assigns a low-quality score to ads with CTRs below 1.5%

Tactics

Social and Display Ads

Display ads are banner ads you see on websites. Social ads are ads you see on social sites like Facebook and Twitter.
Large display campaigns are often used for branding and awareness, much like offline ads. They can also elicit a direct response such as signing up for an email newsletter or buying a product.
Social ads perform exceptionally well is when they’re used to build an audience and engage with them over time, and eventually convert them to customers.

Display ads

The largest display ad networks are Google Display Network, BuySellAds, Advertising.com, Tribal Fusion, Conversant, and Adblade. Niche ad networks focus on smaller sites that fit certain audience demographics, such as dog lovers or Apple fanatics.
To get started in display advertising, you could start to find out types of ads that work in your industry. You could use tools like MixRank and Adbeat to show you ads your competitors are running and where they place them. Alexa and Quantcast can help you determine who visits the sites that feature your competitors’ ads.

Social ads

Social ads work well for creating interest among potential new customers. The goal is often awareness oriented, not conversion oriented. A purchase takes place further down the line. People visit social media sites for entertainment and interaction, not to see ads.
An effective social ad strategy takes advantage of this reality. Use ads to start conversations about your products by creating compelling content. Instead of directing people to a conversion page, direct them to a piece of content that explains why you developed your product or has other purposes than immediately completing a sale. If you have a piece of content that has high organic reach, when you put paid ads behind that piece, magic happens. Paid is only as good as the content you put behind it. You should employ social ads when you know that a fire is starting around your message and you want to put more oil on it.
Major social sites you may consider are LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, StumbleUpon, Foursquare, Tumblr, Reddit, YouTube, and many others.

Offline Ads

Even today, advertisers spend more on offline ads than they do online. When buying offline ads, You should try to advertise to demographics that match up with your target audience. Ask for an audience prospectus or ad kit.
Not sure if magazine ads are a good channel for you? Buy a small ad in a niche publication and give it a test. Want to see if newspapers would be good? Buy a few ads in a local paper. You can also try radio ads and billboards.

Magazine ads

A compelling magazine or newspaper ad will have an attention-grabbing header, an eye-catching graphic, and a description of the product’s benefits. Also, you should have a strong call to action, like an offer to get a free book.

Direct mail

You could also try direct mail by searching for “direct mail lists” and find companies selling such information. (Beware that it can be perceived as spammy)

Local print

You could also try local print ads like local fliers, directories, calendars, church bulletins, community newsletters, coupon booklets, or yellow pages. These work really well for cheap if you want to get early traction for your company in a specific area.

Outdoor advertising

If you want to buy space on a billboard, you could contact companies like Lamar, Clear Channel, or Outfront Media. Billboards aren’t effective for people to take immediate action, but it’s extremely effective for raising awareness around events, like concerts and conferences.
DuckDuckGo bought a billboard in Google’s backyard and it got big attention and press coverage.
Transit ads can be effective as a direct response tool. You can contact Blue Line Media to help you with Transit ads.

Radio and TV

Radio ads are priced on a cost per point (CPP) basis, where each point represents what it will cost to reach 1% of the station’s listeners. It also depends on your market, when the commercial runs and how many ads you’ve bought.
TV ads are often used as branding mechanisms. Quality is critical for it and production costs can run to tens of thousands. Higher-end ones can cost $200K to make. You’ll also need an average of $350,000 for actual airtime. For smaller startups, you could try local TV spots which is much cheaper.
Infomercials work really well for products in categories like Workout equipment, household products, health products, and work-from-home businesses. They can cost between $50,000 and $500,000, and they’re always direct-response.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

SEO is improving your ranking in search engines in order to get more people to your site.
The most important thing to know about SEO is that the more high-quality links you have to a given site or page, the higher it will rank. You should also make sure you’re using the keywords you want to target appropriately on your pages, like in your page titles and headings.
There are 2 strategies to choose from: fat-head and long-tail.
Fat-head: These are one and two-word searches like “Dishwashers,” and “Facebook.” They are searched a lot and make about 30% of searches and are called.
Long-tail: These are longer searches that don’t get searched as much but add up to the majority of searches made. They make up 70% of searches.
When determining which strategy to use, you should keep in mind that the percentage of clicks drops off dramatically as you rank lower. Only 10% of clicks occur beyond the first page.

Fat-head strategy

To find out if fat-head is worthwhile, research what terms people use to find products in your industry, and then see if search volumes are large enough to move the needle. You can use the keyword planner tool for that. You want to find terms that have enough volume such that if you captured 10% for a given term, it would be meaningful.
The next step is determining the difficulty of ranking high for each term. Use tools like Open Site Explorer. If a competitor has thousands of links for a term, it will likely take a lot of focus on building links and optimizing to rank above them.
Next, narrow your list of targeted keywords to just a handful. Go to Google Trends to see how your keywords have been doing. Are they searched more or less often in the last year? You can further test keywords by buying SEM ads against them. If they convert well, then you have an indication that these keywords could get you strong growth.
Next, orient your site around the terms you’ve chosen. Include phrases you are targeting in your page titles and homepage. Get other sites to link to your site. Links with exact phrase matching from high-quality sites will give you a significant boost.

Long-Tail strategy

Because it’s difficult to rank high for competitive fat-head terms, a popular SEO strategy for early-stage startups is to focus on long-tail. If you bundle a lot of long-term keywords together you can reach a meaningful number of customers.
Find out what are search volumes for a bunch of long-tail keywords in your industry? Do they add up to meaningful amounts? Also, take a look at the analytics software you use on your site or google search console to find some of the search terms people are already using to get to your site. If you’re naturally getting a significant amount of traffic from long-tail keywords, then the strategy might be a good fit. Also, check if competitors use this strategy. If they have a lot of landing pages (search for site:domain.com in google), then it’s a sign that this strategy works for your market. Also, check Alexa search rankings and look at the percentage of visitors your competitors are receiving from search.
If you proceed with a long-tail SEO strategy, you’ll need to produce significant amounts of quality content. If you can’t invest time in that, you can pay a freelancer from Upwork to write an article for every search phrase you want to target.
Another way is to use content that naturally flows from your business. Ask yourself: what data do we naturally collect or generate that other people may find useful. Large businesses like Yelp, TripAdvisor, and Wikipedia all gained most of their traffic by producing automated long-tail content. Sometimes the data is hidden behind a login screen and all you need to do is expose it to search engines, or aggregate it in a useful manner.

How to get links?

Don’t buy links, you’ll be penalized by search engines for it. Instead, you can do:

Content Marketing

Companies like Moz and Unbounce have well-known company blogs that are their biggest source of customer acquisition.
Unbounce started a blog and an email list from day one. They used social media to drive readers to your blog. They pinged twitter influencers to ask for feedback, gave away free infographics, and e-books. These actions don’t scale but they push them to a point where their content will spread on its own.
OkCupid is a free online dating site. They intentionally wrote controversial posts like “How your race affects the messages you get” to generate traffic and conversation.

Tactics

Email Marketing

Email marketing is a personal channel. Messages from your company sit next to emails from friends and family. That’s why email marketing works best when personalized. It can be used to build familiarity with prospects, acquire customers, and retain customers you already have.

Email marketing to Find customers

Email marketing to Engage customers

If a customer never gets the value of your product, how can you expect them to pay for it or recommend it to others?

Email marketing to Retain customers

Email marketing can be the most effective channel to bring people back to your site. Twitter sends you an email with a weekly digest of popular tweets and your new notifications.
More business-oriented products usually focus on reminders, reports, and information about how you’re getting value from the product. Mint sends a weekly financial summary to show your expenses and income over the previous week.
You can also use it to surprise and delight your customers. Planscope sends a weekly email to customers telling them how much they made that week. Photo apps will send you pictures you took a year ago.

Email marketing to Drive revenue

You can send a series of emails aimed at upselling customers.
WP Engine sends prospects an email course about Wordpress, and near the end of the email, they make a pitch to signup for its premium Wordpress hosting service.
If one of your customers abandoned a shopping cart, send her a targeted email a day or two later with a special offer for whatever item is left in the cart.
You can use email to explain a premium feature a customer is missing out on and how it can help them in a big way.

Email marketing to get referrals

Groupon generates referrals by incentivizing people to tell their friends about discounts.

Tactics

Viral Marketing

Viral marketing is getting your existing customers to refer others to your product. It was the driving force behind the explosive growth of Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, Dropbox, Instagram, Snapchat, and Pinterest.
It’s so powerful that even if you can’t achieve exponential growth with it, you can still get meaningful growth. If your customer refers a new customer within the first week, you’ll go from ten customers to twenty and double every week without any additional marketing.
The oldest form of virality occurs when your product is so remarkable that people naturally tell others about it — pure word of mouth.
Inherent virality occurs when you can get value from a product only by inviting other customers, like Skype, Snapchat, and WhatsApp.
Others grow by encouraging collaboration like Google Docs.
Some embed virality like adding “Get a free email account with Hotmail” or “Sent from iPhone” to default signatures. Mailchimp and other email marketing products add branding to free customers’ emails.
Some incentivize customers to move through a viral loop, like Dropbox giving you more space if you invite friends to sign up. Airbnb, Uber, and PayPal give you account credits for referring friends.
Some add embedded buttons and widgets to grow virally, like Reddit and YouTube.
Some broadcast users activities on their social networks, like Spotify posting on Facebook when you play a song, or Pinterest when you pin content.
The viral coefficient K is the number of additional customers you can get for each customer you bring in. It depends on i, the number of invites sent per user, and conversion percentage (who will actually sign up after receiving an invite)
K = i * conversion percentage
Any viral coefficient above 1 will result in exponential growth. Any viral coefficient over 0.5 helps your efforts to grow considerably.
You can increase the number of invites per user i by including features that encourage sharing, such as posting to social networks. You can increase the conversion percentage by testing different signup flows. Try cutting out pages or signup fields.
Viral cycle time is how long it takes a user to go through your viral loop. Shortening your cycle time drastically increases the rate at which you go viral. You can do it by creating urgency or incentivizing customers to move through the loops.

Tactics

Engineering as Marketing

You can build tools like calculators, widgets, and educational microsites to get your company in front of potential customers.
HubSpot has Marketing Grade, a free marketing review tool. It’s free, gives you valuable information, and provides HubSpot with the information they use to qualify you as a potential prospect.
Moz has two free SEO tools, Followerwong and Open Site Explorer. They’ve driven tens of thousands of leads for Moz.
WP Engine has a speed testing tool that asks only for an email address in exchange for a detailed report on your site’s speed.

Business Development

With business development, you’re partnering to reach customers in a way that benefits both parties.
Google got most of its initial traction from a partnership with Netscape to be the default search engine and an agreement with Yahoo to power its online searches.
Business development can take the form of:
You should have already defined your traction goal and milestones, and you shouldn’t accept any partnership that doesn’t align with it. Many startups waste resources because it’s tempting to make deals with bigger companies.

Sales

Sales is the process of generating leads, qualifying them, and converting them into paying customers. It’s particularly useful for expensive and enterprise products.

Structuring the sales conversation

Situation questions. Ask one or two questions per conversation. The more you ask situation questions, the less likely they’re going to close.
Problem questions. Use sparingly.
Implication questions. Meant to make a prospect aware of the large implications that stem from the problem.
Need-payoff questions. Focus attention on your solution and get buyers to think about the benefits of solving the problem.

Cold calls

Be judicious about the people you contact. You want someone who is one-two levels up in the organization. They have enough perspective on the problem and some authority for decision making. Avoid starting at the top unless you’re calling a very small business.
Try to get answers about:

Tactics

It’s better to gain traction through a marketing channel first, then use sales as a conversion tool to close leads. The next stage is lead qualification: determine how ready a prospect is to buy. Once you’ve qualified the leads, you should lay out exactly what are you going to do for the customer. Set up a timetable for it and get them to commit with a yes or no whether they’re going to buy. Closing leads can be done by a sales team who does a webinar or product demo and has an ongoing email sequence that ends with a purchase request. In other cases, you may need a field sales team that actually visits prospective customers for some part of the process.
A checklist that can help you with sales:
I removed the last sections because of the post character limit. Here are two:
submitted by alollou to startups [link] [comments]

Had my own thing, now seeking job here

Hi,
I had my successful affiliate website for almost 15 years, so I know the ins and outs of affiliate and internet marketing, and online business in general. Now I'm in a different country and I'm seeking a fully remote job. Part time is fine, and I'm very flexible.
A few things I have done, and can do for you:
-- SEO. I'm extremely good with it. Pretty good with Google Analytics too.*
-- Setup or maintain WordPress sites complete with content, themes, plugins and any modification needed to make it work.
-- Handle support and email, be it from a customer, vendor... or from a state agency.
-- Help you with invoicing and collections.
-- Manage and create your ads, website, blogs, social media, mailings, including coming up with the content.
-- Manage and troubleshoot your UNIX server /VPS to at least a medium level via telnet or cPanel.
-- Research virtually everything for you, suggest new ways of doing things and be a devil's advocate.
-- Virtual Assistant type tasks, in addition to other duties, if needed.
*(Took Google's "Fundamentals of digital marketing" in a few hours, just to see.)

I can all of the above if needed, or I can focus on one or a few things that your company needs. I'm an extremely fast learner as well.
I also have a college degree from a top US university. Specific details will be forwarded to interested parties.
In summary: if you need someone to do a mixture of things needed to run and expand your business, without the full cost of an employee, I'm your guy. Jack of all trades, but master of quite a few.
You get All of the above and 20 year online experience for just $20 an hour (I'm not living in USA right now.)
Contact me and let's take it from there!
submitted by GloomyNectarine2 to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Wordpress theme for blog?

I am starting a WordPress blog related to Blogging, Affiliate Marketing, AdSense, SEO etc.
So, I was browsing through different themes until I came across Avada.
I need your opinion that is this theme reliable, Search Engine Optimized.
SEO is the main aspect I want in my blog, because I am Blogging about it, so it won't make any sense if my own blog is not Search Engine Optimized.
What's your opinion on this theme?
submitted by Marshmelllloo to Wordpress [link] [comments]

40 + Free Courses ( Valid for 2 Days) : Microsoft Excel , HTML5, Yoga, PHP, MySQL, Beating Anxiety, PMI-PMP, Business Analysis , JavaScript, CSS, Lambda, VLSI, Marketing , Wordpress & Many More

Source : https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreeCoursesWithCoupon/permalink/699962134177624/
  1. The Complete Microsoft Excel Pivot Tables and Pivot Charts
  2. The Complete HTML5 Course: From Beginning to Expert
  3. The Complete Google Drive Course - Mastering Google Drive
  4. Designing Landing Pages in Figma: Techniques and Processes
  5. Beating Anxiety: Learn The Hidden Secrets Of Beating Anxiety
  6. Understanding Yoga: Education On The Benefits & Styles
  7. Beating Depression: The Hidden Secrets Of Beating Depression
  8. Affiliate Marketing Supremacy. Learn Affiliate Marketing
  9. WordPress Training for Beginners From Scratch (Eduonix)
  10. Learn PHP and MySQL Development By Building Projects (Eduonix)
  11. NGINX, Apache, SSL Encryption – Certification Course
  12. Create a Members Only Blog using PHP, MySQL, & AJAX
  13. Develop and Manage Resources (PMI – PMP)
  14. Keeping Your Project on Budget (PMI – PMP)
  15. Business Analysis Competencies: Professional Effectiveness
  16. Business Analysis Competencies: Personal Skills (IIBA-ECBA)
  17. Business Analysis Elicitation and Collaboration (IIBA -ECBA)
  18. Pure VPN (US Netflix, Hulu, BBC Access): 85% Off PureVPN + Extra 15% OFF with Coupon Code (1M15)
  19. Free: Full access to 3,800 courses to University and college students @ Coursera
  20. Learn XML-AJAX – For Beginners
  21. Learn PHP – For Beginners
  22. Learn PHP and MySQL Development From Scratch (Eduonix)
  23. Learn CSS3 and HTML Development By Building Projects(Eduonix)
  24. Free : 2 Months Premium & 30% Off Annual Membership – Skillshare
  25. Surfshark VPN : $1.99/Month (Save 83%)
  26. Learn Django and Python Development By Building Projects (Eduonix)
  27. Learn Javascript And JQuery From Scratch (Eduonix)
  28. Learn Responsive Web Development from Scratch (Eduonix)
  29. Learn Software Testing Certification course (Eduonix)
  30. Learn jQuery – For Beginners
  31. Learn Bootstrap – For Beginners
  32. Learn JavaScript – For Beginners
  33. Learn HTML – For Beginners
  34. Learn CSS – For Beginners
  35. Lambda with Functional Programming in Java8
  36. HTML5 Game from scratch step by step learning JavaScript
  37. Plan Your Success. Vision and Goal Setting Systems That Work
  38. Crash Course for Laravel 7 and VueJs Basics
  39. VLSI – Physical Design – 33 Hours of video
  40. Communication skills – CV, Interview, Business letter
  41. Affiliate Marketing for Beginners
  42. Photoshop CC: 20 Common Productivity and Design Mistakes Photoshop CC: 20 Common Productivity and Design Mistakes
  43. Data Analysis & Statistics: practical course for beginners
  44. Color Theory Basics: Learning Color Theory With Adobe Color
  45. AMAZON MASTERY – How To Become An Amazon Best Selling Author
  46. MEDIA MASTERY – How to get into the Media and Press
  47. Beginner English: Practical Foundational English Training
  48. Empathy and Social Awareness EI Certification: Level 3
  49. Manifest Your Dreams with EFT
  50. Enroll 50+ Superstars in Your Networking Marketing Business
  51. Mastering AWS: Featuring IAM
  52. Online Course Essentials – Online Course as Fast As Possible
  53. 60 Free Courses from YouAccel : Web Development, CSS, HTML, JavaScript, jQuery, Bootstrap, PHP, MySQL, XML-AJAX, NGINX, Adobe Illustrator, Kotlin, Ruby and More
  54. 36 FREE Courses from Simpliv: Internet of Things, Python, Cyber Security, Mobile Development, Networking and Security, Web Development, Agile, Cloud Computing, 3D and Animation & More
  55. 22 Free Microsoft Office Training : Access, Excel, Word, Forms, Kaizala, OneDrive, Microsoft Teams, Outlook & More
  56. Learn Hadoop and BigData Technologies (Eduonix)
  57. Become A Certified Web Developer From Scratch (Eduonix)
  58. Learn HTML5 Programming By Building Projects (Eduonix)
submitted by ViralMedia007 to FREECoursesEveryday [link] [comments]

CASE STUDY - MONTH ONE: Attempting to start and build a PROFITABLE website with ZERO experience or knowledge

Month 0-1: The Birth

Okay, it's been an entire month since I started this venture...
and it's been a lot more work than I imagined.
Check out Month Zero here.
Skip down to the bottom if you just want the dirty dirty numbers.

Background Summary

I have absolutely NO idea what I'm doing.
When I said I have zero experience and knowledge, I meant it.
I've never had an affiliate website. I've never built a website, at all. I've never written on any sort of professional level. I'm fairly computer illiterate.
About 1 month and a handful of days ago, I ran across juststart and you guys motivated me to give an affiliate marketing blog/website a shot. I picked a niche that was familiar to me and I got to work.
And boy oh boy, this first month was a lot of work.

"The Business Plan"

I sat down and created a short, one-page, business plan for the affiliate website. Mostly, affiliate marketing is pretty straight-forward, but I did want to hash out a bit more about my target audience.
I found that there are three specific stages of people in my niche. I wrote a bit about each and assigned a monetary rank to each. The stages make no sense without the context of knowing what the niche is. However, it was extremely important for me to define the lines between these stages so that I can focus on the audience stage that has the highest amount of buyer intent.
After narrowing my niche down with these stages, I focused a bit on the demographics of my target audience. However, the demographics range widely from age 18-65 and pretty equally split on the genders. Therefore, I didn't learn much here.
Location of audience. The nice thing about Ahrefs is that you can see where many of the hits on webpages are coming from around the world. I already knew that my niche is very popular in north america and europe, but I also found that there is a significant amount of traffic coming from three other countries. I might try to find a way to capitalize on this traffic.

Competition Research

I got a couple suggestions during my Month Zero post that I should do better research into my niche competition. I did do this, but I did it after I already commited to the niche.
I bough an Ahrefs subscription and made a list of all my competitors. I analyzed their websites and keywords the best I could, without having any previous knowledge on the subject. I don't know how well I did these things, but I did them...
...and I'm glad I did.
It seems like I picked a good niche. There are so many keywords. Even the most common keywords seem to be easy to rank for according to Ahrefs.
There are 5 very well established websites in my niche. These sites have thousands of backlinks and hundreds of posts. When researching a keyword in my niche, two or three of these sites usually appear in the first page of google. However, I've noticed the results on the bottom of page 1 of google usually contains some pretty poor websites. I think I can rise through the ranks and place on bottom of page 1 fairly easily.

Building The Website

I lurked on juststart for a couple days before deciding to pull the trigger. I also read a handful of blog posts on the subject. The general consensus seemed to be that I should just bould my own website...
that it wasn't that hard...
Let me tell you: This was the most time consuming and difficult part of the whole fucking thing.
I bought a domain, I bought hosting. I got wordpress. That all was easy. It took a little research but it wasn't too bad.
But I have never build a website before. I have never used wordpress. Themes? Widgets? Plug-ins? Templates? Cache? I was in way over my head.
Things wouldn't layout the way I wanted. Widgets wouldn't work. Plug-ins werent compatible with other plug-ins. Every little issue I came across took hours of research to fix. I would spend hours building out a page, just to realize I couldn't do what I wanted with my theme. Things weren't compatible. I didn't know what the fuck I was doing.
I was frustrated.
I spent somehwere around 30 hours trying to build out my website. I value my time at $45/hr since that is what I make at my 9-5. I would have made $1350 if I had worked that 30 hours at my job. I know it's not an apples to apples comparison, but just a way I like to measure my time and whether or not what I'm spending my time doing is worth it.
I could have easily spent a fraction of that $1350 and had someone build me out a much better website.
However, I do believe this is a solid skill to learn. After all this trial and error, I feel much more comfortable with wordpress. I know that if I build another website, it will be much easier.
I have my website built and it is now live. Now it is easy to plug in my content from my writers, format it and add in the affiliate links and pictures.

Hiring The Writers

This was the most interesting part for me.
I knew I wanted content writers. I didn't want to write the content myself. However, I needed people knowledgable in my niche.
I decided that instead of going to Upworks or a similar website, I would create a post on a social media group related to the niche. I didn't want to put all the details on the post, since I would be breaking some of the group's rules, so I just basically said "If anyone is interested in a content writing gig related to this niche, please PM me."
I got over 60 PM's in one day. I sent them all to a landing page I created with details about the job and where they could fill out a short online application.
Out of the 60 inquires, only 5 actually filled out the application.
Out of those five, 2 of them didn't follow directions and their application was discarded.
This gave me three applicants. I gave them each a paid trial article to write. One of the applicants never finished their article in the alloted time, the other two did. So that's how I came to find my two content writers.
I pay them $0.02/word, rounded up to an even dollar amount. I had them sign a content writer agreement that I found online, that basically assures that what they submit isn't plagerized and that the content ultimately belongs to me and that I can change or edit the content as I wish.
I gave each of them a choice on whether or not they wanted credit for the articles. They both agreed that they did, so they wrote their bio's and submitted their pictures.
We use the Trello platform and so far I'm very happy with their work. There are some minor grammatical/spelling errors that I have to fix. I go back through and add or change keywords and change the format, but other than that their content is largely unchanged.

The Content

The writers have been hired for about 2 weeks and I have a total of 8 articles (5 are buyer intent lists/reviews/comparisons, 3 are more general informational articles), averaging around 2,000 words each. Only 5 are published as I'm still editing the other 3.
The process of creating content goes like this:
  1. I decide on a topic.
  2. I do research using Ahrefs. I find the best keywords I can rank for on the topic, I look up competitor websites that rank for the keywords and skim their posts to see how I should format mine.
  3. I create a short little assignment sheet for my writers where I list Topic, Format/Things They Should Include, Keywords To Include, Links To Similar Articles
  4. I submit this to Trello and one of my writers will pick it up. Communication is done through Trello and final product is submitted through Trello.
  5. I copy the content to Wordpress and format it/check for errors/add in keywords.
  6. I find pictures. Usually I just find cool pictures related to the topic/niche on instagram and ask if I can use it on my website as long as I give credit back to the person's instagram. So far, every person has said yes. So I just either add a little watermark with their IG handle or just create a caption below the picture with "Credit: IG handle"
  7. I add in the affiliate links and publish.

Affiliate Programs

I signed on with Amazon Affiliate Program and eBay Affiliates. The vast majority of my content right now is amazon affiliates, although I am going to try and diversify.
I have identified 3 other affiliate programs SPECIFIC to my niche. I have created an account for one. I want to have a bit more of an established site before applying to the other two.
I also got denied for Google AdSense because my website was lacking content at the time. I will re-apply for this soon.

Social Media

I have identified three social media networks that are best for my niche. Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest.
Instagram
I created a instagram account and started posting content. I make a post every other day or so and the occasional IG story. I spend about 10 minutes a day liking and commenting on posts.
My instagram has grown to about 130 followers with little to no effort.
Facebook
I debated for a while between a facebook Page and a facebook Group. I eventually decided on the Group.
I like the aspect of community that a Facebook Group could bring. However, I don't know how to get people to join the group.
So far, I have just been "cold calling" the occasional person by sending them a message on facebook asking them to join. I just pick people that are in the niche and might benefit from my group. I have about a 50% success rate so far, but it is time consuming. Right now the group only has about a dozen people. However, they have began communicating on the group and asking/answering questions. Which is what I wanted, so that is nice.
Pinterest
I don't know anything about pinterest. Never used it in my life. I created an account, but that's it.

The Dirty Dirty Numbers

EXPENSES
expense cost
Domain Registration (1 year) $9.06
Hosting Service (1 year) $89.40
Ahrefs 7 day trial $7.50
Ahrefs 1 month $108.16
Elementor Pro $49
Content Writers $262 (7 articles +1 written by me)
TOTAL (Month 1) $525.12
My budget for Month 1 was originally $535 so I am $10 under budget.

INCOME
program income
Amazon Affiliates $0
Ebay Affiliates $0
Other Affiliates $0
Ads $0
Other $0
TOTAL (Month 1) BIG FAT ZERO
I didn't expect to make any money this month, so this is fine.

CONTENT
8 Articles 15,000 words

SOCIAL MEDIA
social media platform members/followers
Instagram 130
Facebook Group 12
Pinterest 0

WEBSITE TRAFFIC
I have no clue how to track this? Is there a wordpress plug-in I can use?

TIME
I was originally going to log all my time spent on this project. However, because of how I work on things (a little here, a little there, while on the toilet, while at work) I found that I would often forget to and I eventually gave up on logging my time.
However, I know I spent easily 30 hours just setting up the website.
Once an article is written, it takes me a solid hour or two to edit, format, plug in the affiliate links, and find pictures.
Keyword research for finding a topic for an article takes about 30-60 minutes per topic.
I'm hoping my time spent doing these things will drop as I get better at them. Right now, I am spending way more time than I wanted to. This was largely due to the giant learning curve of figuring out how to build a website. However, if this continues to be the case, I am going to hire a Virtual Assistant to plug in and format the articles.

Next Steps

Creating content is now the primary focus. I will just continue to find topics for my writers and try to get as much content as possible over the next 2 months.
I want to grow my facebook group. I feel like out of all the social media platforms, this will be the most valuable one once it is established. Right now the only way I've been getting members is by just messaging people and asking them to join. I hope after I get a good amount of members it will grow on its own.
I will just continue doing what I'm doing with instagram. Seems to be working.
I need to figure out what to do with pinterest.
I am going to start looking for backlinks. I'll just cold call other websites and ask them to link back to mine. I don't know how else to go about this at this time.

Questions For You

submitted by Ibecolin to juststart [link] [comments]

Free marketing guide for startups: How to achieve explosive growth!

Here is the summary of the book Traction: How any startup can achieve explosive growth.
I hope that you find it useful!

Traction is a sign that your startup is taking off. If you charge, it means customers are buying. If your product is free, it means your user base is growing.
If you have traction, all your technical, market, and team risks become easier to handle. It becomes easier to fund-raise, hire, do press, partnerships, and acquisitions.
Traction trumps everything.

How to think about Traction?

Almost every failed startup has a product. What failed startups don’t have is enough customers.
You should spend your time in parallel, both constructing your product and testing traction channels.
This is what we call the 50 percent rule: spend 50 percent of your time on product and 50% on traction. This rule seems simple but it’s hard to follow because the pull to spend all your attention on the product is strong. You’re probably making a startup because you want to build a particular product. You have a vision, but a lot of traction activities are unknown and outside your vision and comfort zone. So you try to avoid them. Don’t.
Doing product and traction in parallel has these benefits:
Before trying to get traction, you’ll need to define what traction means for your company. You need to set a traction goal. Maybe your current startup goal is to raise funding or become profitable. How many customers do you need and at what rate? You should then focus on marketing activities that result in a significant impact on your traction goal. It should move the needle.
Your startup has 3 phases:

Phase I: Make something people want

In phase 1, your product has the most leaks, it really doesn’t hold water. You shouldn’t scale up your efforts now, but it’s important to send a small amount of water through the bucket so you can see where the holes are and plug them. \ Your goal in phase 1 is to get your first customers and prove your product can get traction. You focus on building your initial product and getting traction in ways that don’t scale: giving talks, writing guest posts, emailing people you know, attending conferences, and doing whatever you can to get in front of customers.

Some founders believe that startups either take off or don’t. Actually startups take off because the founders make them take off!
– Paul Graham

Phase II: Market something people want

Once you hone your product, you have product-market fit and customers are sticking around. Now is the time to scale up your traction efforts. You fine-tune your positioning and marketing messages.

Phase III: Scale your business

As your company grows, smaller traction strategies stop moving the needle, so you’ll start to scale.
In phase 3 you have an established business model and significant position in the market, and you’re focused on scaling to further dominate the market and to profit.

Traction for funding

When pursuing funding, first contact individuals who understand what you’re working on. The better your investors understand what you’re doing, the less traction they’ll need to see before they invest. Also, try friends and family who may not need to see any traction before investing as they’re investing in you personally.

To pivot or not to pivot

Many startups give up way too early. The first thing to look for is evidence of real product engagement, even if it’s only a few dedicated customers. If you have such an engagement, you might be giving up too soon. Look for the bright spots in your customer base and see if you can expand from that base.

How to get traction? The Bullseye framework

The Bullseye framework helps you find the channel that will get you traction. Most businesses actually get zero distribution channels to work. If you can get even a single distribution channel to work, you have a great business. If you try for several but don’t nail one, you’re finished.
You’re aiming for bullseye: the one channel at the center of the target that will unlock your next growth stage. Here are the 3 Bullseye framework steps:

Find what’s possible: The outer-ring

The first step in Bullseye is brainstorming every single traction channel. It’s important not to dismiss any channel in this step. Think of at least one idea for each channel. For example, social ads is a traction channel. Running ads on Facebook or Twitter is a channel strategy within social ads. You could research what marketing strategies worked in your industry as well as the history of companies in your space.

Find what’s probable: The middle-ring

Go around your outer-ring and promote your best and most exciting ideas to your middle-ring. For each traction channel in your middle ring, now construct a cheap traction test you can run to find if the idea is good or not. These tests need to answer the following questions:
  1. What’s the cost of acquiring customers?
  2. How many customers are available?
  3. Are they the right type of customers for you now?
You want to design small scale tests that don’t require much up-front cost or effort. For example, run 4 Facebook ads instead of 40.

Find what’s working: The inner-ring

The final step in Bullseye is to only focus on one channel that will move the needle for your startup: your core channel. At any stage of your startup, you should have one traction channel that you’re focusing on and optimizing.
Most founders mess this up by keeping around distracting marketing efforts in other channels.
If search engine marketing is significantly better for you than other channels, you should focus all your efforts on this core channel and uncover additional strategies and tactics within it.
If no channel seems promising after testing, the whole process should be repeated. If you tried several times with no success, then your product may require more tweaking and your bucket might be still leaky.

How to test traction?

Middle-ring tests: You should be running several cheap tests that give you an indication of how successful a given channel strategy could be.
Inner ring tests:
You’re doing two things:
  1. Optimize your chosen channel strategy to make it the best it can be.
  2. Discover better channel strategies within this traction channel.
There is always a set of things you can tweak. For targeting blogs, you can tweak which blogs to target, type of content, call to action, etc. For search engine marketing, you can tweak keywords, ad-copy, demographics, and landing pages.
A common approach is to use A/B testing, where A is the control group and B is the experimental group. The purpose of it is to measure the effectiveness of change in a button color, an ad image, or a different message on a web page. If the experimental group performs significantly better, you can apply the change, get the benefits, and run another test.
You can use tools such as Optimizely, Visual Website Optimizer, and Unbounce.
Over time, all marketing channels become saturated. To combat this, you should always be trying to discover new strategies and tactics within your channel and conduct small experiments. Also, experiment with new marketing platforms while they’re still in their infancy.

Tools

To track your tests you could start with a simple spreadsheet or use an analytics tool with cohort analysis. You’ll need to answer these questions:
  1. How many people landed on the website?
  2. What are the demographics of my best and worst customers?
  3. Are customers who interact with my support team more likely to stay?
A basic analytics tool like Clicky, Mixpanel, or Chartbeat can help you with these questions. You can use a spreadsheet as the tool to rank and prioritize traction channel strategies. You should include columns like how many customers are available, conversion rate, the cost to acquire a customer, lifetime value of a customer for every given strategy.

How to focus on the right traction goals? The critical path framework

Define your traction goal

You should always have an explicit traction goal you’re working towards. This could be 1,000 paying customers or 100 new daily customers, or 10% of your market. You want a goal where hitting the mark would change things significantly for your company’s outcome.
Once that is defined, you can work backward and set clear time-based subgoals. Such as reaching 1,000 customers by next quarter.
The key is to follow the critical path towards that goal and exclude all features and marketing activities that don’t help you reach your goal. Everything you decide to do should be assessed against your critical path.

Avoid traction biases

Your competitive advantage may be acquiring customers in ways your competition isn’t. That’s why it’s critical to avoid have traction biases. Stop your urge to refuse channels like speaking engagements, sales or affiliate marketing, business development, or trade shows just because you hate talking on the phone or you find the channel annoying or time-consuming.

Targetting blogs

Targeting blogs that your prospective customers read is one of the best ways to get your first wave customers.
Mint’s initial series of tests revealed that targeting blogs should be its core channel. They asked users to embed an “I want mint” badge on their personal blogs and rewarded them with a VIP access before other invitations were sent out. They also directly sponsored blogs. They sent bloggers a message with “Can I send you $500” as the subject and told them a bit about the product.
To find smaller blogs in your niche:
You can also target link-sharing communities like Reddit, Product Hunt, and Hacker News.
Dropbox, Codecademy, Quora, and Gumroad all got their first customers by sharing their products on HackerNews because their products were a good fit for users on that site.

Publicity

Starting out, an article in TechCrunch or The Huffington Post can boost your startup in the eyes of potential customers, investors, or partners. If you have a fascinating story with broad appeal, media outlets will want to hear from you.
It’s easier to start smaller when targeting big media outlets. Sites like TechCrunch and Lifehacker often pick up stories from smaller forums like Hacker News and subreddits. Instead of approaching TechCrunch, try blogs that TechCrunch reads and get story ideas from. It’s easier to get a smaller blog’s attention. Then you might get featured on TechCrunch and then The New York Times which reads TechCrunch!
What gets a reporter’s attention?
A good press angle makes people react emotionally. If it’s not interesting enough to elicit emotion, you don’t have a story worth pitching.
A good first step is using a service like Help A Reporter Out (HARO), where reporters request sources for articles they’re working on. It could get you a mention in the piece and help establish your credibility. Also, you could offer reporters commentary on stories related to your industries.
You can use Twitter to reach reporters online; almost all of them have Twitter accounts and you’d be surprised how few followers many of them have, but they can be highly influential with their content.
Once you have a solid story, you want to draw as much attention to it as you can:
Once your story has been established as a popular news item, try to drag it out as long as you can. Offer interviews that add to the story. Start “How We Did This” follow-up interviews.
As your startup grows you may consider hiring a PR firm or consultant.

Unconventional PR

Nearly every company attempts traditional publicity, but only a few focus on stunts and other unconventional ways to get buzz.

The publicity stunt

Customer Appreciation

Be awesome to your customers. Shortly after Alexis Ohanian launched Hipmunk, he sent out luggage tags and a handwritten note to the first several hundred people who mentioned the site on Twitter.
Holding a contest is also a great repeatable way to generate publicity and get word of mouth. Shopify has an annual Build a Business competition.
Great customer support is so rare that, if you make your customers happy, they’re likely to spread the news of your awesome product. Zappos is one of the best-known examples of a company with incredible customer service and they classify support as a marketing investment.

Search Engine Marketing (SEM)

SEM is placing ads on search engines like Google. It’s sometimes called “pay-per-click” because you only pay when a user clicks on an ad.
SEM works well for companies looking to sell directly to their target customer. You’re capturing people who are actively searching for solutions.
Click-Through Rate (CTR) The percentage of ad impressions that result in clicks to your site.
Cost per Click (CPC) The amount it costs to buy a click on an ad.
Cost per Acquisition (CPA) How much it costs you to acquire a customer, not just a click. If you buy clicks at $1 and 10% of people who hit your site make a purchase. This makes your CPA at $10.
CPA = CPC / conversion percentage

SEM to get early customer data

You can use SEM as a way to get early customer data in a controlled and predictable way. Even if you don’t expect to be profitable, you can decide to spend a certain amount of money to get an early base of customers and users to inform you about important metrics such as landing page conversion rates, average cost per customer, and lifetime value.
Archives.com used AdWords to drive traffic to their landing pages, even before they built a product, to test interest in a specific product approach. By measuring the CTR for each ad and conversions, they determined which product aspects were the most compelling to potential customers and what those people would actually pay for. When they finally built their product, they built something they knew the market would want.

SEM strategy

Find high-potential keywords, group them into ad groups, and test different ad copy and landing pages within each ad group. As data flows in, remove underperforming ads and landing pages and make tweaks to keep improving results.
Use tools like Optimizely and Visual Website Optimizer to run A/B tests on your landing pages.

Keyword research

Use Google’s keyword planner to discover top keywords your target customers use to find products like yours. You could also use tools such as KeywordSpy, SEMrush, and SpyFu to discover keywords your competition is using.
You can refine your keyword list by adding more terms to the end of each base term to create long-tail keywords. They’re less competitive and have lower search volumes which makes them ideal for testing on smaller groups of customers.
SEM is more expensive for more competitive keywords, so you’ll need to limit yourself to keywords with profitable conversion rates.
You shouldn’t expect your campaigns to be profitable right away, but if you can run a campaign that breaks even after a short period of time, then SEM could be an excellent channel for you to focus on.

Writing ads

Write ads with titles that are catchy, memorable, and relevant to the keywords you’ve paired with it. Include the keyword at least once in the body of your ad and conclude with a prominent call to action like “Check out discounted Nike sneakers!”
Each of your ads and ad groups will have a quality score associated with it. A high-quality score will get you better ad placements and better ad pricing. Click-through rate has the biggest influence on quality score, so you should tailor your ads to the keywords. Google assigns a low-quality score to ads with CTRs below 1.5%

Tactics

Social and Display Ads

Display ads are banner ads you see on websites. Social ads are ads you see on social sites like Facebook and Twitter.
Large display campaigns are often used for branding and awareness, much like offline ads. They can also elicit a direct response such as signing up for an email newsletter or buying a product.
Social ads perform exceptionally well is when they’re used to build an audience and engage with them over time, and eventually convert them to customers.

Display ads

The largest display ad networks are Google Display Network, BuySellAds, Advertising.com, Tribal Fusion, Conversant, and Adblade. Niche ad networks focus on smaller sites that fit certain audience demographics, such as dog lovers or Apple fanatics.
To get started in display advertising, you could start to find out types of ads that work in your industry. You could use tools like MixRank and Adbeat to show you ads your competitors are running and where they place them. Alexa and Quantcast can help you determine who visits the sites that feature your competitors’ ads.

Social ads

Social ads work well for creating interest among potential new customers. The goal is often awareness oriented, not conversion oriented. A purchase takes place further down the line. People visit social media sites for entertainment and interaction, not to see ads.
An effective social ad strategy takes advantage of this reality. Use ads to start conversations about your products by creating compelling content. Instead of directing people to a conversion page, direct them to a piece of content that explains why you developed your product or has other purposes than immediately completing a sale. If you have a piece of content that has high organic reach, when you put paid ads behind that piece, magic happens. Paid is only as good as the content you put behind it. You should employ social ads when you know that a fire is starting around your message and you want to put more oil on it.
Major social sites you may consider are LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, StumbleUpon, Foursquare, Tumblr, Reddit, YouTube, and many others.

Offline Ads

Even today, advertisers spend more on offline ads than they do online. When buying offline ads, You should try to advertise to demographics that match up with your target audience. Ask for an audience prospectus or ad kit.
Not sure if magazine ads are a good channel for you? Buy a small ad in a niche publication and give it a test. Want to see if newspapers would be good? Buy a few ads in a local paper. You can also try radio ads and billboards.

Magazine ads

A compelling magazine or newspaper ad will have an attention-grabbing header, an eye-catching graphic, and a description of the product’s benefits. Also, you should have a strong call to action, like an offer to get a free book.

Direct mail

You could also try direct mail by searching for “direct mail lists” and find companies selling such information. (Beware that it can be perceived as spammy)

Local print

You could also try local print ads like local fliers, directories, calendars, church bulletins, community newsletters, coupon booklets, or yellow pages. These work really well for cheap if you want to get early traction for your company in a specific area.

Outdoor advertising

If you want to buy space on a billboard, you could contact companies like Lamar, Clear Channel, or Outfront Media. Billboards aren’t effective for people to take immediate action, but it’s extremely effective for raising awareness around events, like concerts and conferences.
DuckDuckGo bought a billboard in Google’s backyard and it got big attention and press coverage.
Transit ads can be effective as a direct response tool. You can contact Blue Line Media to help you with Transit ads.

Radio and TV

Radio ads are priced on a cost per point (CPP) basis, where each point represents what it will cost to reach 1% of the station’s listeners. It also depends on your market, when the commercial runs and how many ads you’ve bought.
TV ads are often used as branding mechanisms. Quality is critical for it and production costs can run to tens of thousands. Higher-end ones can cost $200K to make. You’ll also need an average of $350,000 for actual airtime. For smaller startups, you could try local TV spots which is much cheaper.
Infomercials work really well for products in categories like Workout equipment, household products, health products, and work-from-home businesses. They can cost between $50,000 and $500,000, and they’re always direct-response.

Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

SEO is improving your ranking in search engines in order to get more people to your site.
The most important thing to know about SEO is that the more high-quality links you have to a given site or page, the higher it will rank. You should also make sure you’re using the keywords you want to target appropriately on your pages, like in your page titles and headings.
There are 2 strategies to choose from: fat-head and long-tail.
Fat-head: These are one and two-word searches like “Dishwashers,” and “Facebook.” They are searched a lot and make about 30% of searches and are called.
Long-tail: These are longer searches that don’t get searched as much but add up to the majority of searches made. They make up 70% of searches.
When determining which strategy to use, you should keep in mind that the percentage of clicks drops off dramatically as you rank lower. Only 10% of clicks occur beyond the first page.

Fat-head strategy

To find out if fat-head is worthwhile, research what terms people use to find products in your industry, and then see if search volumes are large enough to move the needle. You can use the keyword planner tool for that. You want to find terms that have enough volume such that if you captured 10% for a given term, it would be meaningful.
The next step is determining the difficulty of ranking high for each term. Use tools like Open Site Explorer. If a competitor has thousands of links for a term, it will likely take a lot of focus on building links and optimizing to rank above them.
Next, narrow your list of targeted keywords to just a handful. Go to Google Trends to see how your keywords have been doing. Are they searched more or less often in the last year? You can further test keywords by buying SEM ads against them. If they convert well, then you have an indication that these keywords could get you strong growth.
Next, orient your site around the terms you’ve chosen. Include phrases you are targeting in your page titles and homepage. Get other sites to link to your site. Links with exact phrase matching from high-quality sites will give you a significant boost.

Long-Tail strategy

Because it’s difficult to rank high for competitive fat-head terms, a popular SEO strategy for early-stage startups is to focus on long-tail. If you bundle a lot of long-term keywords together you can reach a meaningful number of customers.
Find out what are search volumes for a bunch of long-tail keywords in your industry? Do they add up to meaningful amounts? Also, take a look at the analytics software you use on your site or google search console to find some of the search terms people are already using to get to your site. If you’re naturally getting a significant amount of traffic from long-tail keywords, then the strategy might be a good fit. Also, check if competitors use this strategy. If they have a lot of landing pages (search for site:domain.com in google), then it’s a sign that this strategy works for your market. Also, check Alexa search rankings and look at the percentage of visitors your competitors are receiving from search.
If you proceed with a long-tail SEO strategy, you’ll need to produce significant amounts of quality content. If you can’t invest time in that, you can pay a freelancer from Upwork to write an article for every search phrase you want to target.
Another way is to use content that naturally flows from your business. Ask yourself: what data do we naturally collect or generate that other people may find useful. Large businesses like Yelp, TripAdvisor, and Wikipedia all gained most of their traffic by producing automated long-tail content. Sometimes the data is hidden behind a login screen and all you need to do is expose it to search engines, or aggregate it in a useful manner.

How to get links?

Don’t buy links, you’ll be penalized by search engines for it. Instead, you can do:

Content Marketing

Companies like Moz and Unbounce have well-known company blogs that are their biggest source of customer acquisition.
Unbounce started a blog and an email list from day one. They used social media to drive readers to your blog. They pinged twitter influencers to ask for feedback, gave away free infographics, and e-books. These actions don’t scale but they push them to a point where their content will spread on its own.
OkCupid is a free online dating site. They intentionally wrote controversial posts like “How your race affects the messages you get” to generate traffic and conversation.

Tactics

Email Marketing

Email marketing is a personal channel. Messages from your company sit next to emails from friends and family. That’s why email marketing works best when personalized. It can be used to build familiarity with prospects, acquire customers, and retain customers you already have.

Email marketing to Find customers

Email marketing to Engage customers

If a customer never gets the value of your product, how can you expect them to pay for it or recommend it to others?

Email marketing to Retain customers

Email marketing can be the most effective channel to bring people back to your site. Twitter sends you an email with a weekly digest of popular tweets and your new notifications.
More business-oriented products usually focus on reminders, reports, and information about how you’re getting value from the product. Mint sends a weekly financial summary to show your expenses and income over the previous week.
You can also use it to surprise and delight your customers. Planscope sends a weekly email to customers telling them how much they made that week. Photo apps will send you pictures you took a year ago.

Email marketing to Drive revenue

You can send a series of emails aimed at upselling customers.
WP Engine sends prospects an email course about Wordpress, and near the end of the email, they make a pitch to signup for its premium Wordpress hosting service.
If one of your customers abandoned a shopping cart, send her a targeted email a day or two later with a special offer for whatever item is left in the cart.
You can use email to explain a premium feature a customer is missing out on and how it can help them in a big way.

Email marketing to get referrals

Groupon generates referrals by incentivizing people to tell their friends about discounts.

Tactics

Viral Marketing

Viral marketing is getting your existing customers to refer others to your product. It was the driving force behind the explosive growth of Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, Dropbox, Instagram, Snapchat, and Pinterest.
It’s so powerful that even if you can’t achieve exponential growth with it, you can still get meaningful growth. If your customer refers a new customer within the first week, you’ll go from ten customers to twenty and double every week without any additional marketing.
The oldest form of virality occurs when your product is so remarkable that people naturally tell others about it — pure word of mouth.
Inherent virality occurs when you can get value from a product only by inviting other customers, like Skype, Snapchat, and WhatsApp.
Others grow by encouraging collaboration like Google Docs.
Some embed virality like adding “Get a free email account with Hotmail” or “Sent from iPhone” to default signatures. Mailchimp and other email marketing products add branding to free customers’ emails.
Some incentivize customers to move through a viral loop, like Dropbox giving you more space if you invite friends to sign up. Airbnb, Uber, and PayPal give you account credits for referring friends.
Some add embedded buttons and widgets to grow virally, like Reddit and YouTube.
Some broadcast users activities on their social networks, like Spotify posting on Facebook when you play a song, or Pinterest when you pin content.
The viral coefficient K is the number of additional customers you can get for each customer you bring in. It depends on i, the number of invites sent per user, and conversion percentage (who will actually sign up after receiving an invite)
K = i * conversion percentage
Any viral coefficient above 1 will result in exponential growth. Any viral coefficient over 0.5 helps your efforts to grow considerably.
You can increase the number of invites per user i by including features that encourage sharing, such as posting to social networks. You can increase the conversion percentage by testing different signup flows. Try cutting out pages or signup fields.
Viral cycle time is how long it takes a user to go through your viral loop. Shortening your cycle time drastically increases the rate at which you go viral. You can do it by creating urgency or incentivizing customers to move through the loops.

Tactics

Engineering as Marketing

You can build tools like calculators, widgets, and educational microsites to get your company in front of potential customers.
HubSpot has Marketing Grade, a free marketing review tool. It’s free, gives you valuable information, and provides HubSpot with the information they use to qualify you as a potential prospect.
Moz has two free SEO tools, Followerwong and Open Site Explorer. They’ve driven tens of thousands of leads for Moz.
WP Engine has a speed testing tool that asks only for an email address in exchange for a detailed report on your site’s speed.

Business Development

With business development, you’re partnering to reach customers in a way that benefits both parties.
Google got most of its initial traction from a partnership with Netscape to be the default search engine and an agreement with Yahoo to power its online searches.
Business development can take the form of:
You should have already defined your traction goal and milestones, and you shouldn’t accept any partnership that doesn’t align with it. Many startups waste resources because it’s tempting to make deals with bigger companies.

Sales

Sales is the process of generating leads, qualifying them, and converting them into paying customers. It’s particularly useful for expensive and enterprise products.

Structuring the sales conversation

Situation questions. Ask one or two questions per conversation. The more you ask situation questions, the less likely they’re going to close.
Problem questions. Use sparingly.
Implication questions. Meant to make a prospect aware of the large implications that stem from the problem.
Need-payoff questions. Focus attention on your solution and get buyers to think about the benefits of solving the problem.

Cold calls

Be judicious about the people you contact. You want someone who is one-two levels up in the organization. They have enough perspective on the problem and some authority for decision making. Avoid starting at the top unless you’re calling a very small business.
Try to get answers about:

Tactics

It’s better to gain traction through a marketing channel first, then use sales as a conversion tool to close leads. The next stage is lead qualification: determine how ready a prospect is to buy. Once you’ve qualified the leads, you should lay out exactly what are you going to do for the customer. Set up a timetable for it and get them to commit with a yes or no whether they’re going to buy. Closing leads can be done by a sales team who does a webinar or product demo and has an ongoing email sequence that ends with a purchase request. In other cases, you may need a field sales team that actually visits prospective customers for some part of the process.
A checklist that can help you with sales:
submitted by alollou to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

We just compiled a huge list of learning resources for digital marketing. We thought this sub would appreciate it!

Hey guys! With the whole self-isolation thing going on, it’s an awesome time to learn a new skill (or ten). I've been hoarding some of the best guides / resources on digital marketing for the past ~5 years or so, and recently decided to transform it into a guide.
To make it an awesome read, I also created learning paths for most of the digital marketing channels. So, it's not like, "go read 4835 articles," but more like, "Read A, then B, then C," and so on.
Enjoy!

Before we start talking about specific channels, though, let's discuss HOW you can learn digital marketing best.

First things first - you need to decide which channel to start with.
If you have a knack for writing, we’d recommend going with Content Marketing or Copywriting. On the other hand, if you’re more analytics-oriented, go for Search Ads or PPC.
As a given, you DON’T have to learn all the channels. You can just pick one that you like, and specialize in it!
Once you’ve decided on which channel to roll with, you should also establish a learning methodology.
As with most things in life, reading on digital marketing won’t take you far. You need to also put everything into practice.
We usually recommend going with one of these 4 options:
  1. Create a test learning environment. Basically, you create a website for a basic product or service (heck, even a blog would do!), and start applying whatever you learned about digital marketing to get leads and customers. Even if you have ZERO budget, this can be an interesting learning experience. And yes - it’s possible to start w/ a zero budget.
  2. Get an internship. This can be a bit painful if you’re in the middle of your current career, but hey, swallow the pride. If you do your best, you’ll be doing some real work 6 months after the internship.
  3. Offer a local business to help them with marketing for free. Find a business you think you can help in your area and reach out to them!
  4. Create an affiliate blog. Pick a niche, create an affiliate blog, and start pumping out some content. This is mainly relevant if you want to learn SEO or content marketing.
And here’s what you SHOULD NOT DO:
Read a guide or two, buy a course, whip out your own website, repurpose the course and start pretending to be a marketing expert to potential clients.
There’ are way too many people doing this as-is. Please stop! You’re setting yourself up for failure.
You’d be surprised how many people we see on Facebook Ads groups asking, “hey guys, I closed my first client, now how the heck do I deliver on my promises?”
...Now that we got that out of the way, let’s get to learning some digital marketing!

How to learn content marketing

Most traditional advertising channels are focused on directly selling a product. If you turn on the TV, you’ll see a TON of ads for this product, or that product or service.
Content marketing is a form of indirect advertisement.
The idea here is, instead of directly pitching your product to your target audience, you create content (article, video, infographic, etc.) around the problem your product solves, and pitch that instead.
To make this a LOT clearer, here’s a practical example.
Let’s say you’re a marketing agency that specializes in helping SaaS companies with their digital marketing (meta, right?).
Instead of directly running ads yelling “We help SaaS companies!” you create a mega-guide on the topic and advertise that.
...Which is what we did.
We created a mega-guide to SaaS marketing and promoted the hell out of it all over the web. This netted us around ~10,000+ traffic and 15+ leads in the first week, and we STILL get traffic to the piece, 2 months later.
We even posted it on this sub and got around 600 upboats.
Sweet, right?
Now, you’re probably wondering, is this option better than just running ads to your service / product?
Yes, yes it is. Here’s why:
  1. It’s free (ish). The only resources it took was our time to write the post, edit it, and promote it. Ads, on the other hand, can be super expensive.
It builds your brand authority. Who’d you trust with your marketing? A random guy that popped up on your Facebook newsfeed, or the guys that wrote the most comprehensive guide to SaaS marketing you’ve ever read? Exactly!
If you want to learn how to do content marketing, here's what we recommend:
  1. First, learn the basics. You can find a ton of online courses or articles on this. Here are some of our favorites:
    1. HubSpot’s Academy content marketing course
    2. Neil Patel’s guide to content marketing basics
    3. Content Blogger’s guide to content marketing
  2. Learn how to create and promote authority content
    1. Hubspot’s guide to content creation
    2. Copy Blogger’s guide to creating epic content
    3. How to promote your content
  3. Learn how to create SEO content (more on this in the next section)
    1. How to use the skyscraper technique
    2. How to create SEO content
    3. How to create top content with the Wiki Strategy
  4. Learn how to do content marketing for a local business with Google’s course
  5. Read some case studies. Some of our favorites include:
    1. How Chris Von Wilpert made $100,000 by creating and promoting a single blog post
    2. How Mint grew to 1.5 million users (a big chunk of the credit goes to content marketing)

Learn SEO

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is another super popular digital marketing channel.
In a nutshell, SEO is the act of optimizing your web pages and content for Google so that your website pops up when people look up certain terms.
For example, let’s say you’re a project management software. Would it benefit you if you popped up #1 when people Google for your keyword?
Yes, yes it would. You’d be getting highly qualified leads for your software every day, for free, with ZERO ad spend.
Cool, right?
Here’s what an SEO specialist does on a daily basis:
Now, here’s how to learn SEO...

SEO Learning Path

  1. First off, learn the basics.
    1. SEO Basics by Backlinko
    2. SEO in 2020 by Backlinko
    3. Awesome SEO tutorial on Reddit
    4. What’s DA/PA
  2. Then, learn how to do technical SEO, set up tracking, and optimize your website
    1. Setup Google Analytics and Search Console
    2. Improve load speed. Check out this article by Moz
    3. Optimize your web pages for SEO. For this, you can use RankMath if you’re using WordPress, and Content Analysis Tool if you’re not
    4. Losslessly compress all your images. This should save ~75% of space for your images and drastically increase site load speed (which improves SEO). If you’re using WordPress, you can use Smush to automatically compress all images on your site.
  3. Learn how to do keyword research
    1. Top guide on How to do keyword research
  4. Learn how to create SEO landing pages
  5. Learn how to create SEO content
    1. Our own guide to creating SEO content
    2. Backlinko’s skyscraper strategy (i.e. how to create and promote epic SEO content)
    3. How to create top content with the Wiki Strategy
  6. Learn how to do link-building
    1. Learn link-building basics
    2. Learn how to do outreach
    3. Discover ALL the link-building strategies out there
  7. Learn how to optimize article headlines
  8. Read some case studies
    1. How Nat grew a website to 10k+ visitors per month
    2. How Pipedrive ranked on a high-volume keyword
If you’re learning digital marketing because you own a local business, then the game is a bit different. While 90% of the principles above still apply, you should also read about local SEO and how it works.

...And other channels

So we already tried making this post a bit back, but Reddit shadowbanned us for having way too many outbound links. If you guys want to get the full list of resources (and marketing channels to learn), you can check out the complete blog post.
submitted by DrJigsaw to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Starting my second blog: Full of doubts, need your help

I have no significant work to do in the next two months, so I have decided to create a blog(an affiliate blog, so I will be able to cover the expenses). I already have a personal blog, with wordpress.com, and This time I want to do technical stuff so no wordpress.com Disclosure - Only knowledge I have, I owe it to this subreddit and other subreddits. Yes, I can tell the difference between WordPress.org and Wordpress.com 1. Choosing a Niche I have chosen the niche already, it will be about collectables and toys, I think its interesting enough to keep me hooked. There are so many prospects of narrowing down on Niche, and later branching out. Any suggestions here. 2. Domain and hosting So there are other subreddits for hosting, they have advised me well. I am going with WordPress. 3. Creating content-most important part It will take a lot of time to get used to the plugins, I have started doing keyword research to chalk out the articles. I am looking forward to preparing a suitable template, which will be tough I have no knowledge about it, but once completed, it could help a lot. Important thing I am thinking about writing 50-100 articles(min. 1200 words), before taking off. It will be hard, but I will try if I could write as many articles targeting small keywords. This goal seems feasible to me because, my current blog's content is related, so it could help me and I have a lot of time to spare. I have decided to do this because I don't want to stress about views after writing 5-10 articles and get demotivated(it has already happened with me, and I also see a lot of people, who are in the same boat). Then regularly pumping out content weekly or biweekly. If this strategy is viable, need suggestions here 4. Content marketing- I will not touch it in the next 2-3 months, because I will be too busy. Then, I think Pinterest would be a relevant platform to generate some traffic alongside Google (only if I am lucky enough). But no paid ads in near future. 5. Backlinks and other SEO stuff I think I can handle basic stuff like on-page SEO and keyword research, there are kind people out there to help me. I have no idea about backlinks, they just confuse me. And I have a lot of time to spare but few bucks to spare. So buying backlinks is hardly a option. If I can leave it alone initially? Or any other viable advice. Writing this post alone has cleared many doubts and after getting your advice, I believe it would be a smooth ride. I hope It will help me to learn things and Improve my crappy grammar.
submitted by Dhanraj28 to Blogging [link] [comments]

1 000 000$ Case Study 01 (online_wizz )

A Summary of This Case Study
I will be building a large authority site that does real-life product reviews in a specific niche. My goal is to eventually sell it for one million dollars.
I will be posting updates at the start of each month with my current progress and stats.
Is This a Joke?
Nope. That's actually my goal. I won't be treating this as a part-time hobby or a typical Amazon affiliate site. This will be a real business, and I actually think that achieving this goal is realistic. My deadline for this project is four years, so April 2024. To achieve this, I'll eventually need to hire a team of 5-10 writers/reviewers.
A Little Background Information About Me
I started my first niche site and affiliate marketing in general in 2018. A while ago, I sold that site for 6X XXX$.
I've always been kind of lazy with this site. A few months I was motivated and published a bunch of stuff, but on most of them, I didn't do a thing. I averaged about 3.5 new articles per month. I wrote everything myself, and it was a typical Amazon Associates blog about a specific niche. Made about 50% of revenue from ads and 50% from Amazon Associates.
I always had that "what if" sitting in the back of my head. What if I'd actually invest myself 100% into this project? What if I wouldn't just follow everyone else and base everything on posts about products that I've never touched in real life? What if I'd start treating this as a business, instead of a part-time project? What if instead of focusing only on SEO, I'd do Youtube, social media, newsletter, and focus on retaining my visitors?
With this new project, I'll answer that "what if". No more pussying around. I'll put my heart and soul into it.
By the way, I'm still freelance writing for 40-80 hours per month, because I don't want to eat through my savings. I plan on putting in ~200 hours per month in total, so 120-160 hours per month for this project.
The Main Idea Behind This Authority Site
I've done the competitor research in this niche, and it's a more competitive one compared to my last site. That said, I still found a few successful "typical affiliate sites" with obviously outsourced "meh-quality" content. Some of them get up to 500k monthly users, and some of them are only a few years old, which tells me that there's still some room left for new competition.
In this authority site, I'll be focusing only on products, not information. This doesn't mean that I won't be writing any "info" articles. You can still write long & detailed guides about how to use a specific product, which type you should choose, what materials to look out for and so on. That said, most of the content on the site will be "best x" comparisons and product reviews.
I'll definitely be going for quality, not quantity. If it means I'm publishing only 4 articles per month, so be it. I'll increase the output by hiring people.
All of the product reviews will consist of a video review and a long & detailed article review. I'll actually be buying every product that I review in real life. My strategy at first is to target cheaper, but still very popular products. That's because all of the pricier, high-quality products are already reviewed by a ton of blogs. And the thing is, brands usually send out their products for reviewing for free to all the larger review sites, so everyone's competing for the same keyword. When the site grows, I might start to target these terms as well, but I'll definitely stick to lower-competition reviews first, which are easier to dominate.
I won't be relying solely on SEO for traffic. I'll also be publishing a lot on Youtube, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter (in that order.) I'll also go very heavy on the newsletter and focus a lot of my efforts on repeat visitors.
On my previous site, I didn't do any link building. Now I'll start link building, but not in the usual "affiliate" way. I won't be doing broken link building, skyscraper, link swaps, guest posts, PBN's, and all the usual stuff. What I will be doing is HARO, getting on podcasts & interviews, and building links naturally with unique tools/data. But most of all, I will be focusing on getting a large number of repeat visitors, which will result in a lot of natural links anyway.
What I've Done so Far
Basically, I've done all the prep work for the site and now I'm ready to start publishing.
A Rough Timeline and Smaller Goals
I'll assume that this site will be sold for ~40x monthly multiple because it will be very high-quality, it'll come with 5-10 employees, a large email list, and a large following on social media. For it to be worth one million dollars, I'll need 25 000$ profit per month on average in the last 12 months. When factoring in salaries and other expenses, it will probably need to earn about 35000$ per month. I'm thinking ~90% will come from affiliate marketing and 10% from ads.
Based on what I think I can achieve, I'll keep these as my target goals to keep on track.
Why Am I Writing This Case Study?
Usually, I'm pretty bad at writing updates, but I'll try to change that this time around. I want to keep myself motivated and accountable, and hopefully later down the road inspire someone else.
Plus, it will be fun to read this after four years. I know it's a very, very ambitious goal, but I'll actually put my heart and soul into this project, and I've already got experience, so I think it's achievable.
Also, have you seen a case study with the end goal in 7 digits? Wouldn't it be cool if this guy actually succeeds?
RemindMe! 1462 days "1 000 000$ case study"
submitted by online_wizz to juststart [link] [comments]

CASE STUDY. Month Zero: Attempting to start, and build, a PROFITABLE website with ZERO experience or knowledge.

Alright, let’s do this!

...but I’ve never done anything like this before. I mean, I’m not even starting from ground zero,
I’m levels below that.
I have limited computer knowledge. I can fumble my way through an excel document and help my mom make an occasional post on Facebook—it’s been over a decade and she still can’t figure it out.
I fear I’m gonna be a lot more like my mom going forward. This is all new to me.
But! I have an idea, I have a dream, I have free time...
...and I even have a little bit of money.
I can spend countless hours obsessing, learning, researching, thinking, and dreaming... or I can take action right now and learn as I go.
If History has told me anything, it’s that I’m the King of Inaction. I’m 32 years old, and I’ve let many opportunities pass me by. No more. Time to do this shit.
Alright, let’s get to the nitty gritty of Month Zero, The Birth.

The Niche

I thought about what niche I wanted to tackle for less than two days before I made my decision. The blessing (and the curse) is that I have a lot of hobbies. A lot of interests.
I regularly partake in five-or-so outdoor activities that seem to be rather profitable niches, at least to my untrained eye. A couple are rather obscure, the rest far more popular. I have personal interest in the big niches too—weight loss, fitness, supplements, diets, self improvement... like, I really enjoy those topics already.
My suggestion for anyone searching for, and struggling to find, a niche is this:
Just look at things you do in your daily life, your hobbies, and google them. See what’s out there. Find one that you already partake in at some level. It will make the whole process more enjoyable if you have an interest in the niche yourself (at least that’s what I’m banking on).
There are niches everywhere! My “9-5 career” is, actually, rather fucking niche. Hell, my life style, in and of itself, is a niche.
I made a list of 10 niches, I like most of them and will tackle the rest if the one I picked works out.
Without giving you too many details, here’s a pro’s and con’s list I came up with for the niche:
PROS
CONS
Needless to say, I’m rather excited about this niche and that’s definitely a good thing.

The Goal

I would like the website to become profitable in 9 months. I believe that is an extremely tall order considering my lack of experience, but I like to aim high. I am prepared to sink some money into the project (more on that in The Budget section).

The Plan

I’m going to create an affiliate market based website, mainly focusing on amazon and eBay, and try to become an authority in the niche.
After doing further research I have discovered that Amazon Affiliates might not be the best option so I will begin to identify other options. I have found two affiliate programs specific to this niche.
I will try and build a strong email list through some sort of opt in program. Most likely I will create a short “how-to” e-book about a specific common problem in this niche.
If all goes as planned I will then use the email list to help market a much more detailed ebook down the road.
Outside of affiliate links, I also plan on running specific/targeted ad’s on the page. I will have to do more research on this, and it won’t come until later.
As I’ve stated multiple times, I have zero experience in the following: website creation/design, content creation, affiliate marketing, SEO/keywords, pretty much anything outside of browsing reddit and watching endless YouTube videos. This leads me to a very keystone concept to my business model...
I’m going to outsource... as much as possible. I will focus my energy and time on creating systems and models for my freelancers to follow. In addition, I will learn as much as I can about SEO and keywords in the following months.
This is my general timeline, broken down in 3 main phases.

Phase 1: “The Birth” Month 0-1 

Phase 2: “The Growth” Month 2-3 

Phase 3: “The Takeover” Month 4-9 

Hiring the Freelancers

I will be doing all the initial website creation. After exactly one hour of research, I have decided that it doesn’t seem too difficult to figure it out and get it at least up and running.
I will hire 2 content writers and I’m planning on paying them (no more than) $30 / article. These will typically be simple 1500-2000 word articles. Mainly focused on product reviews and buyer-like “best x-product” type lists, and general informative content. I will write 1-2 lengthy and informative how-to articles (4000+ words) each month, but that’s about all the time I’m willing to commit to content creation.
I have two possibilities for the hiring outlet for these writers.
  1. Use a third party freelance network like Upwork.
  2. Reach out to the four online communities I am a part of that are in this niche. There are a lot of people out of work right now that are looking for extra side income. Although they probably won’t have any experience in content writing, they would be very knowledgeable about the niche and that would allow me to give them more involved and informative content to create.
Either way I go, I will have to properly vet the potential freelancers. I will ask them to either provide an example of their work or write a 500 word story about a specific topic. I will ask them to put [insert random word here] in the title of the email to screen out anybody that didn’t follow the directions.
If I like the writing, I will pick 4 and give them a trial article to write, which I will pay them for. Then, I will pick my two favorite and draft up some sort of contract for them to sign relating to the content usage and pay. I will let them know what to expect and how to submit their work, probably using something like Trello.
At first I think I’m just going to cap them out at one article per week each. I will do very brief google/amazon research to identify a topic. Then I will assign it to a writer along with a general and rough idea of what I’m looking for and a few keywords to use (although I’d only be guessing at this point). They will have the rest of the week to turn in the article.
Virtual assistant... not sure if I need one at first, or if I will have enough work to even warrant one. However, there are just some tasks I don’t want to and don’t like to do. If the VA could take the content and format it properly, upload it to the website, and add the affiliate links... that would be great! But, with only two articles coming in a week, how much time would that take? 1-2 hours?
I do have a personal project that would be perfect for a VA. It’s something that I have been putting off for over a year and would take approximately 5-8 hours of work. I figure I could hire a VA for this, and for the website, to test the waters.
Whatever I end up doing, I plan to find a VA for no more than $10/hr. They would have to be familiar with Excel for the personal project and Trello and Wordpress for the website. I would eventually like to have him/her do some basic research on competition and possible content topics for the writers.
I will have to hire a freelance graphic designer for a headebanner and logo design. I will use fivver and I’m looking to spend no more than $50 for this service.
By phase 2, I plan on starting the social media campaigns. I think I can manage those myself, at first. Facebook and Instagram are the two biggest social platforms for my niche, and I am very familiar with those. The third big one, however, is Pinterest... and I know NOTHING about that. I will evaluate the need for hiring a Pinterest social media VA in Phase 2.
If I can’t figure out SEO and keywords by Phase 3, I will have to hire a SEO guy... I don’t know exactly what that entails or how much that will cost me. I’ve read that I can get a VA experienced in SEA and keywords, which is probably what I will do if I need to.
Website design... same as the SEO shit. If I can’t figure it out I am fully prepared to outsource or at least hire a one time consultant to optimize the site. I will evaluate this need during Phase 3.

The Budget

Now I don’t even know if it is crazy or not to drop a chunk of money on starting a website when you have no clue what you are doing, but I’m prepared to do it.
I’m only going to focus on the budget for the first two phases. I don’t expect to make a single cent in revenue from the website during (at least) the first three months. That means it will be all out of pocket.
disclaimer: I am fully aware that I have no clue what I’m doing. These numbers are just my best guess. I will adjust accordingly as it plays out.
1) Phase 1: Month 0-1 “The Birth” (This phase will have a lot of up-front costs
scroll over for notes
Cost Notes
BlueHost $125 (for 1 year) Choice Plus plan 1 year. The 3 year plan is cheaper, but I’ve heard bad things about BlueHost and I don’t want to commit that much in case I decide to switch.
WordPress** $120 Premium plan 1 year. I don’t know if this is the plan I need or not. They offer a free plan, is that sufficient? Or, do I need the even more expensive business plan for the plug-ins and themes?
Content Writers $240 2 articles a week, $30/article. This will give me 10 articles the first month (8 + the two I write)
Virtual Assistant $120 $10/hr x 3hwk I didn’t include the personal project and I don’t actually know how much (or if I even will) hire a VA, but this would be my budget for one if I did.
Graphic Designer $50 One time fee
Total $535
^(\*i was informed that I do not need to pay for Wordpress, so I will be cutting this out of my budget)*

2) Phase 2: Month 2-3 “The Growth”
scroll over for notes
Cost Notes
Content Writers $240 /mo x 2mo = $480 Same as before, which will give me a total of 30 articles by the end of month 3.
Virtual Assistant $160/mo x 2mo = $320 $10/hr x 4hwk Might start ramping up the work (adding some search reports) if I end up hiring a VA.
Pinterest social media campaign $240/mo x 2mo = $420 (hehe) I didn’t know how much a Pinterest VA cost, but a quick google search showed me $15/hr. I didn’t know how much a Pinterest VA would work, so I guessed about 30 minutes a day, 7 days a week, rounded up to 4 hours /week. After looking at this cost, I don’t know if it would be worth it.
Total $610/ mo = $1220
Like I said, I don't know if I will spend the $420 on a Pinterest VA at this stage. I think it would be best put towards the writers and generating more content. The overall budget will stay the same, however.
This means, over three months, I will plan on spending $1755

Additional Costs

Shit, I almost forgot.
A lot of those SEO and keyword tools cost money. If I was to allocate $100 total to this category, what would your suggestions for tools be? What would get me the most BANG for my buck?

In Conclusion

Thank you so much for reading this.
I know it’s been a long, long write up. It was mostly for my benefit to hash out the idea and create a plan, but I hope somebody might get some use out of my thought process.
And please...
If you have ANY opinions or suggestions, I welcome them with open arms (just maintain that 6 feet).
Cheers.
ps, I tried to format the best I could.
submitted by Ibecolin to juststart [link] [comments]

BY : HERM ENEGILDO D. PAMPILO. AUSTRALIA boasts of its vibrant and pulsating online business activities providing the needs of customers for a wide-ranging commodities while at the same time offering Affiliate Marketing opportunities to Publishers such as https://flashpoint888.wordpress.com and other publishers. A harrowing survey of Australia’s business landscape, based on Commission The affiliate includes the link in their blog content and/or via their email marketing efforts and invites readers to click it to find out more. When a potential buyer clicks on the link to visit the affiliate partners’ site, a cookie identifying the affiliate is placed on their computer. One of the most frequently asked questions about affiliate marketing is, ‘What exactly is affiliate marketing?’. Wikipedia says that: Affiliate marketing is a marketing practice in which a business rewards one or more affiliates for each visitor or customer brought about by the affiliate’s marketing efforts. A bold design and create content areas make it a great start for your blog or marketing site. Upload you custom logo, select striking brand colors to stand out, and even add a WooCommerce store. Final Words on the best Affiliate Marketing WordPress Themes. Affiliate marketing is one of the prominent ways to earn money online. Shawn Collins (Affiliate Marketing Blog) Shawn Collins has been an affiliate marketer since 1997 and is another big industry name. He’s the co-founder of Affiliate Summit, a staple industry

[index] [3373] [11354] [6153] [5245] [8085] [2649] [3769] [4594] [4663] [59]